How Can I Be Happy Trucking When I Get Really Lonely On The Road And Hate Being Away From Home?

Topic 7390 | Page 1

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Chris G.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, my name is Chris I am a 23 year old male. This is my first Forum post, I was driving Tractor Trailer for 7 months last year, I was away from home Monday to Friday (some Saturdays) but home Every weekend. It feels like it's not enough, like there is no social life, how can one enjoy trucking making good money but be away from friends and girlfriends at the same time? I'm the kind of guy who likes to be home at the end of the day, so maybe long haul trucking isn't for me? but I am a good driver and it's in my blood to drive I've always loved it. Can I get some advice and some suggestions that may be able to help me figure out what kind of trucking is best for me?

Thank you.

Chris R Gilbert

Carter's Comment
member avatar

Wow Chris. It might have been a little easier if you asked the secret of the universe, but I will try anyway.

You may hear a lot about how you are young and need to take advantage of the opportunity you have, or "when I was your age, I would have..."

None of that really matters, you have kind of already answered your own question. You love to drive, but not more than you want to be at home. Nothing anyone says here is going to change how you feel about not being with your friends/family. Those are your priorities and just because they may not be mine doesn't make them any less valid.

Knowing that being OTR will make you miserable, I think it is safe to say that over time, you would resent it. Your best bet is most likely to be finding something local. With 7 months experience, you may be able to find something where you live that will get you home every night, but be warned, it may only be long enough to untie your boots, eat and pass out. Not much social about that either.

At the end of the day, the 23 year old you needs to find something that makes him happy, while setting up the 43 year old you to be in a financially secure place so that he won't have to struggle to support your choices.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

I have one thing to say to you sir..... LTL!

I hope 6string gets in on this one too, because he can elaborate more. But in a nut shell you're home every night, you make great money, and you still get to drive the big boy trucks! And nevermind all that crap you'll hear about getting local with no experience, it's BS. It sounds like something that would be a great fit for you.

You could also look into food service companies like sysco or coca cola. These jobs involve a lot more physical labor, but if you're ok with that then they are a great option.

Hope you find what you're looking for! Good luck

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Yep, you should look into local Chris. You didn't add your location, so I don't know where you are, but location is the biggest thing in regard to local truck driving opportunities. Location will trump experience. Heavy C is right, that 1-2 years experience isn't as prevalent anymore, or strictly adhered to.

I'm a linehaul driver for an LTL company. I love trucking, but love my family and hometime much more. I get home every day, and have 2 days off a week. Granted, I had to start with being out 4 days out of my 5 day work week, but that was a temporary sacrifice. I also work an average of 10-12 hours a day (technically it's nights, since most linehaul gigs are night shift), sometimes 14, but it's worth it to have a great job and support my family. I work hard 5 days a week, and enjoy time off 2 days a week, and I'm paid well. I don't sleep at truck stops, I don't deal with shippers and receivers since I'm linehaul, and I get to leave work at work and enjoy having a family life. In a nutshell, I don't have a lifestyle as a trucker, I have a trucking job.

Here's a link to my LTL thread, documenting my linehaul job experience and providing general info on LTL. Depending on your location, this might be an option for you.

LTL Trucking: My Linehaul Job

Best wishes to you!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Allyn L.'s Comment
member avatar

Consider bus driving as another option if you already have (or can get) your passenger endorsement. Of course, you'll need to be comfortable dealing with people in all sorts of situations....

Chris G.'s Comment
member avatar

Consider bus driving as another option if you already have (or can get) your passenger endorsement. Of course, you'll need to be comfortable dealing with people in all sorts of situations....

Currently driving a School Bus lol and I have my S

Tracy W.'s Comment
member avatar

The companies doing short haul in my area (Conway, DTS, etc) typically require a year or two on the road before they will hire you. If you do OTR for a year, you may be able to get on with them.

The other option, at least in my area, is tankers. There are three refineries near by, and lots of tankers running the area. Those are usually short line and are ALWAYS looking for drivers, at least in this area. Another option, albeit dangerous, is log truck driving if any of that activity is going on in your area.

Tracy

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Hi Chris.

That is a hard one. I felt the same way at your age and unfortunately made decisions with that as a big influence. I am one of those guys who coulda, woulda, shoulda. Three divorces an 4 kids (wouldn't change that) later, I am realizing my dream, rebuilding my bank account and can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel. I dismissed the lonely and feeling out of the loop stuff and decided I will be happy even if I have to go "home" to an empty house.

You just have to decide what path you will take and learn as you grow.

Good luck to you

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marcus K.'s Comment
member avatar

You need a local job . try end dumps , mixers , dump trucks , ... you will be very unhappy even on a long local day . I normally drive about 600 miles a day and rarely talk to anyone . Not for you I think . Does not bother me .

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