Split Sleeper Berth Case Study

Topic 8551 | Page 1

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Charles K.'s Comment
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This case is happening on me.

Say I started working at 0400 for 3.0 hours, then I arrived at shipper and throw myself into sleeper berth for 5.0 hours, my cellphone rings, the guy in office told me to get the paperwork, my load is done. So I drive away with paperwork on hand. 4.5 hours later, I stopped at a TA and call it a day(1.5hours left on my 14 at that moment) At this time, I would like to get through Chicago area in midnight, so I can do 8hrs split SB break, then drive again and take another 2hrs break in north Chicago.

When I got up after my 8hrs break due, I found that my 14 has 9.5hrs instead of 1.5hrs that I expected, what is going on here? That 5hrs is not actually a devising break of two shift correct? So shouldn't it count the whole previous 14hrs on duty shift period, which is 12.5hrs total?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
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After your 8 hours in sleeper berth , it will show what was left on your 14/11 hour clocks when you started the SB timer. So it has been my experience that unless I am able to get 7 or more hours to run once the SB part is over, it is not worth doing a split SB. It is better (IMHO) to just wait the extra 2 hours and get the entire 14/11 hours back.

Ernie

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Old School's Comment
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Charles, this is puzzling, but you didn't give us enough information. We would need to know what happened prior to the start of your day at 0400. If you had a two hour break in there somewhere that eight hours that you took could be calculated as the second half of a split sleeper which would explain why you had more hours than you expected. Other than that I'm not sure what is going on here.

Old School's Comment
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You probably would have been just as well off to just take the ten hour break and just start your day around 2 in the morning. You would still avoid the madhouse traffic in Chicago that way.

Charles K.'s Comment
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Charles, this is puzzling, but you didn't give us enough information. We would need to know what happened prior to the start of your day at 0400. If you had a two hour break in there somewhere that eight hours that you took could be calculated as the second half of a split sleeper which would explain why you had more hours than you expected. Other than that I'm not sure what is going on here.

That was a full 10hrs break before 0400.

Old School's Comment
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Okay, I'm just as "bumfuzzled" as you on this one.

We use the Zonar system in our trucks, and when looking at our available hours you can't always go by just looking at the 11 or the 14 hour clock. You have got to look at all of them including the 70 to really make sure you are reading it right. My old qualcomm system would show the right time in each clock, but in this one it may show that I have 11 hours when I really only have three left on my 70.

I'm just throwing that out there just in case you might have looked at something wrong.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Charles K.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay, I'm just as "bumfuzzled" as you on this one.

We use the Zonar system in our trucks, and when looking at our available hours you can't always go by just looking at the 11 or the 14 hour clock. You have got to look at all of them including the 70 to really make sure you are reading it right. My old qualcomm system would show the right time in each clock, but in this one it may show that I have 11 hours when I really only have three left on my 70.

I'm just throwing that out there just in case you might have looked at something wrong.

OldSchool, I know what you mean, but I swear I read through the summary tab, on line 3 that's my available 14. I should take a photo tho. Orz

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You know what Charles, I think I misunderstood part of this whole equation. It looks to me like you actually got credited with the first half of a split sleeper break at the end of that five hour break that you took. It doesn't have to be exactly two hours, it can go longer. So now when you took an eight hour break you are actually doing the second half of your split sleeper break which is why you had more hours than you expected.

If you had not taken two hours or more on that first break in the day your clock would have went right back to where it was when you started the eight hour break.

Charles K.'s Comment
member avatar

Graph 050715 truck drivers hours-of-service example <span class= logbook graphs" title="truck drivers hours-of-service example logbook graphs">

Chart 050715 truck drivers hours-of-service example logbook graphs

Graph 050815 truck drivers hours-of-service example logbook graphs

Chart 050815 truck drivers hours-of-service example logbook graphs

Here comes some supplemental information.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Graph 050715 20150509_7b6acecef3466070fae695ItfCTdcbO

Chart 050715 20150509_078ebd9eb6d421feb11eDYt68Di7BvK

Graph 050815 20150509_5a47ee16107409a513947iWJb1gHxpr

Chart 050815 20150509_b802e28e43d5c87c626eU9S64ACeZbG

Here comes some supplemental information.

Is that before or after the edit? Just kidding.

I have studied and used the split sleeper enough to know that if the damn qualcomm shows time to roll, I roll.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
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