Workers Comp Question.

Topic 8669 | Page 1

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Andre R.'s Comment
member avatar

I am currently at orientation which starts tomorrow. While here I have come across many drivers who have been hurt and are out on workers comp. They are here doing their recovery. When I asked why they aren't home for this they reply from all of them is that the company mandated them remain here in this hotel not at home. If they chose to go home They lose their comp payments and the company will not pay the medical bills. This is a first I'm hearing of such a thing and am curious if this is common. I've always been under the impression that if it's a comp case you have the right to treatment by the physician of your choice even if the company suggest you use theirs. I could be wrong but would like some feedback on this If anyone knows.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

I am currently at orientation which starts tomorrow. While here I have come across many drivers who have been hurt and are out on workers comp. They are here doing their recovery. When I asked why they aren't home for this they reply from all of them is that the company mandated them remain here in this hotel not at home. If they chose to go home They lose their comp payments and the company will not pay the medical bills. This is a first I'm hearing of such a thing and am curious if this is common. I've always been under the impression that if it's a comp case you have the right to treatment by the physician of your choice even if the company suggest you use theirs. I could be wrong but would like some feedback on this If anyone knows.

I guess it depends on how the company has the workers comp insurance setup.

I am presently out on medical leave from JB Hunt, and I am presently at home for all my medical treatments, care, etc. Because it's not workers comp I would imagine is part of the reason why in my case.

I know I would be asking about that during orientation if I was in your position.

By the way, what company are you in orientation for?

Ernie

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Andre R.'s Comment
member avatar

It is a definite question I'll be asking. I don't like that one bit. I'm currently at covenant in Chattanooga. Its no where near a deal breaker but something I would like more info on.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Andre, many of these trucking companies are "self insured" - I saw this same procedure at Western Express. It seems that since they are paying you some sort of salary while you are recovering they want to be able to keep an eye on you and have you do some "light duty" work around the terminal until you are released for regular duty. I've seen them use their injured drivers for shuttle van drivers, instructors in an orientation class, and even just shuttling trailers around the yard with a "yard dog".

I was an employer for thirty years and any time we had a person out on a workers comp claim the insurance company always wanted me to come up with a light duty job that they could do during their re-hab. Apparently there is considerable data showing that those persons who keep on working during that time will recover faster and therefore reduce the insurance liability considerably.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Andre R.'s Comment
member avatar

Old school that's exactly what I'm seeing with a few injured folks here. They drive the shuttle. I would assume this is the catch where if.you go home They can terminate or not pay you because you have refused suitable work. This is good to know and as always you seem to always hit the nail on the head. What I would give to be able to ride along with you for a week to pick your brain and gain some of your knowledge.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I could teach you all all I know in about five minutes!

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

And the company saves costs out of pocket.....

Once an injured employee’s workers comp claim is paid, the employer’s most important role begins. The employer should maintain frequent contact with the employee to monitor their healing progress. By doing so, the employer will be able to gauge when the injured employee will be able to begin the return to work program.

According to the 2009 RIMS Benchmark Survey, 86% of companies have a return to work program. However, many small to mid-sized companies lack efficient programs that enable recovering employees to return to work in a limited, but productive role. Most smaller companies feel that setting up a return to work program will require too much effort for the few injuries that occur each year. This is simply not true.

Return to work programs reduce the number of lost work days for just about every employee involved. By doing so, it accomplishes two goals. First, it reduces the company’s future increases in workers’ comp or disability insurance since such policies pay out large claims for lost wages. Therefore, by reducing lost wages, claims will drop, which will reduce premiums.

Second, return to work programs are directly correlated to productivity benefits. On average, individuals receiving disability benefits are paid between 50% and 70% of their normal wage. By bringing employees back to work at 100% pay, the company is only paying 50% to 30% more while benefitting from 40 productive hours each workweek.

The longer a person is out of work, the greater the chance they will NEVER return to work. According to Bureau of Labor statistics, if an employee is off work for an occupational illness for more than one year, there is only a 25% chance they will return to work. If they are off work for two years, there is almost no chance of a successful return to work.

Andre R.'s Comment
member avatar

Old school that I don't believe and if so it would be the most valuable five minutes I've spent in a long time.

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