Prime ,Roehl , Schnieder ? Dont Want To Be Jerked Around.

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Deonte M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys I'm preparing to get my cdl. However I actually have some experience. Heres a quick background. I traveled with my dad otr for 5 mos. In that time I got an accurate first person view of the lifestyle , and I can say 100% I love it! In fact I would hate coming home. My dad would be the one wanting to more than me and he's a ten year vet! Go figure! In this time I was the one attaching and unattaching trailers (at all hours of the day ) , planning trips , giving pre trip inspections , I learned how to double clutch , Float Gears , Ive backed in and docked trailers at receivers/shippers , dealt with personnel at shippers etc. pretty much the whole 9 except actually drive on Hwy. I realize I'm not ready for my test but I'm ahead of most of my pre cdl peers. I have not taken my permit test but ik the Georgia manual like the back of my hand and ace the hrtt test on here ;) I'm sure this is what I want ,so no lectures on that please. I'm a different 21 year old than the others of my generation . I'm sure.

Now comes my questions. 1. I have researched Roehl , prime and Schneider . All are good companies. But in choosing a company how can I choose 1 that wont screw around? Meaning a company that doesn't do a bunch of bs deductions and treat their drivers badly. I've heard a tale of 2 cities when it comes to those 3. However I'm willing to bet the people who were treated "badly" weren't good workers and wanted to be home every weekend. I like to work and to be away from home! However I want to be treated right for my honest services and work ethic.

2. Pay. From my experience I am a driver who does not like to be sitting home. Can drivers who work comment on there pay and what its like? I like primes .38 start pay but the others have not said anything specific on pay on their site. I will not get behind the wheel for less than .36 however. I hear horror stories of drivers doing 70 hrs and only bring home 3-400 $ . I can work at bk for that much. Input on that?

3. Should I pay for cdl school out of pocket or attend a training program? I intend to stay with my company for a while so the year contract means little if anything.

4. I turn 21 in July. Should I start applying for pre hire now? Or wait?

5. Will my work history affect me in any way? Ive been working since I was 16 . had multiple jobs however my longest was Sam's club and for a year.

6. Things you wish you knew going into trucking ,or learned and want to pass on to me.

Thank you for your time to read and respond to my post. Your time is greatly appreciated and your advice will not go unheeded!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Float Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hey Deonte. You're the second young man in a row with a great attitude that's new to the site. That's a great way to start my Sunday morning! I like people who are motivated and ready to work hard and make something of themselves.

As far as choosing a company I would completely ignore any "reviews" people give in other forums. All of those companies you're looking at are great companies and I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to work for any of them. You could make a great career out of those places if you wanted to.

The most important thing you'll want to do is approach the beginning of your trucking career the same way you would approach the Army. You're going to be closely monitored and tested from the moment you arrive, especially if you're going to attend a Company-Sponsored Training Program like Prime and Roehl have. They will purposely do things to test your patience, your determination to become a truck driver, your ability to adapt to unexpected changes, and your willingness to listen and cooperate. On a daily basis people get sent home from these programs because they come in with certain expectations about how the training should be done and how they should be treated. When they show up and find that things are completely different from what they expected they assume the company is somehow incompetent or dishonest. Their attitude begins to sour, they stop putting in their best effort, they start getting confrontational with the instructors, and before they know it they're on a bus heading home feeling like they get screwed. In reality, they screwed themselves but don't even realize it.

Go into this with the approach that you'll do whatever is asked of you, assuming of course it's safe and legal. If they change the planned schedule five times a day just roll with it. If an instructor is giving you a hard time and is hard to get along with just smile and listen closely to everything he's teaching you. Assume that everything they're doing is a pre-calculated move to test your patience, determination, and resolve because often times that's exactly what they're doing. They're simply tossing a wrench into your expectations to see if you're going to freak out or roll with it.

You're going to be treated in the beginning exactly as you should be treated - like a wannabe who thinks he has what it takes to make it in trucking but likely does not. Why? Because that is exactly what most people are that get started in trucking. They underestimate how complex and difficult it is. They think they know more than they do. You may know better because you've been out there and you know a little bit about it. But they don't know you. You're going to have to prove to them that you have what it takes to make it.

I want to be treated right for my honest services and work ethic.

Remember, they don't know you from Jack Squat. You have to prove to them that you're the type that's going to work hard, be safe & reliable, and represent the company like a true professional. Don't expect them to treat you that way from the beginning because you haven't accomplished anything yet. Expect them to treat you like a rookie with little chance of making it in this business until you prove otherwise. These companies have been highly successful in this industry for decades. They don't have to prove anything to you. You have to prove everything to them.

As far as the pay, Prime has the best pay for rookie drivers of any company I know of. You can expect to make about $35,000-$40,000 your first year and $40,000-$45,000 your second year if you're the type to run really hard. You'll make just a little less at the other two I expect, but not enough to make that the most important consideration. Find a company that you feel suits you best overall. Consider also their benefits, equipment, types of freight, regions of the country they'll have you running, and things of that nature.

As far as Company-Sponsored Training versus private schooling goes I would first find the company I was most interested in. If they have a training program then do your schooling there. Schneider does not have their own schooling but they do have deals setup with private schools and they will reimburse your tuition. But you can get a great start to your career either way. It's just a matter of choosing the schooling that makes sense for the plans you have.

Since you're turning 21 in July you can certainly go ahead and begin applying for pre-hires now.

As far as your work history, as long as you've been working and it's verifiable then you're fine. It doesn't matter if you've had a lot of different jobs, as long as you've had jobs. What companies don't like to see is someone who has been out of work quite a bit. I believe someone in another thread mentioned that Prime wants to see that you've been working at least two out of the past three years. They know how difficult trucking is and they don't believe someone who has chosen not to work will suddenly become a go-getter and excel in one of the most demanding jobs you'll ever find.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hey Deonte. You're the second young man in a row with a great attitude that's new to the site. That's a great way to start my Sunday morning! I like people who are motivated and ready to work hard and make something of themselves.

As far as choosing a company I would completely ignore any "reviews" people give in other forums. All of those companies you're looking at are great companies and I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to work for any of them. You could make a great career out of those places if you wanted to.

The most important thing you'll want to do is approach the beginning of your trucking career the same way you would approach the Army. You're going to be closely monitored and tested from the moment you arrive, especially if you're going to attend a Company-Sponsored Training Program like Prime and Roehl have. They will purposely do things to test your patience, your determination to become a truck driver, your ability to adapt to unexpected changes, and your willingness to listen and cooperate. On a daily basis people get sent home from these programs because they come in with certain expectations about how the training should be done and how they should be treated. When they show up and find that things are completely different from what they expected they assume the company is somehow incompetent or dishonest. Their attitude begins to sour, they stop putting in their best effort, they start getting confrontational with the instructors, and before they know it they're on a bus heading home feeling like they get screwed. In reality, they screwed themselves but don't even realize it.

Go into this with the approach that you'll do whatever is asked of you, assuming of course it's safe and legal. If they change the planned schedule five times a day just roll with it. If an instructor is giving you a hard time and is hard to get along with just smile and listen closely to everything he's teaching you. Assume that everything they're doing is a pre-calculated move to test your patience, determination, and resolve because often times that's exactly what they're doing. They're simply tossing a wrench into your expectations to see if you're going to freak out or roll with it.

You're going to be treated in the beginning exactly as you should be treated - like a wannabe who thinks he has what it takes to make it in trucking but likely does not. Why? Because that is exactly what most people are that get started in trucking. They underestimate how complex and difficult it is. They think they know more than they do. You may know better because you've been out there and you know a little bit about it. But they don't know you. You're going to have to prove to them that you have what it takes to make it.

I want to be treated right for my honest services and work ethic.

Remember, they don't know you from Jack Squat. You have to prove to them that you're the type that's going to work hard, be safe & reliable, and represent the company like a true professional. Don't expect them to treat you that way from the beginning because you haven't accomplished anything yet. Expect them to treat you like a rookie with little chance of making it in this business until you prove otherwise. These companies have been highly successful in this industry for decades. They don't have to prove anything to you. You have to prove everything to them.

As far as the pay, Prime has the best pay for rookie drivers of any company I know of. You can expect to make about $35,000-$40,000 your first year and $40,000-$45,000 your second year if you're the type to run really hard. You'll make just a little less at the other two I expect, but not enough to make that the most important consideration. Find a company that you feel suits you best overall. Consider also their benefits, equipment, types of freight, regions of the country they'll have you running, and things of that nature.

As far as Company-Sponsored Training versus private schooling goes I would first find the company I was most interested in. If they have a training program then do your schooling there. Schneider does not have their own schooling but they do have deals setup with private schools and they will reimburse your tuition. But you can get a great start to your career either way. It's just a matter of choosing the schooling that makes sense for the plans you have.

Since you're turning 21 in July you can certainly go ahead and begin applying for pre-hires now.

As far as your work history, as long as you've been working and it's verifiable then you're fine. It doesn't matter if you've had a lot of different jobs, as long as you've had jobs. What companies don't like to see is someone who has been out of work quite a bit. I believe someone in another thread mentioned that Prime wants to see that you've been working at least two out of the past three years. They know how difficult trucking is and they don't believe someone who has chosen not to work will suddenly become a go-getter and excel in one of the most demanding jobs you'll ever find.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Lastly, as far as what I've learned and would like to pass on, I've written a book called Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Trucking and it's free to read right here on the website. We also have our Truck Driver's Career Guide which is packed full of awesome information and over 400 articles in our Truck Driving Blogs on every topic imaginable. So you won't run out of great advice and insights anytime soon.

smile.gif

Deonte M.'s Comment
member avatar

WOW. Thank you Great response! I get it that it all about proving yourself . So I'm ready to get down to work with the can do attitude. And I will most definitely check out the info you said. I'm glad I found and registered to this site . Its like having personal mentors in your back pocket! Most guys have an ego and are afraid to ask about driving but my desire to learn AND do things the best way trumps my ego any day! If youre reading this and lurking the forums I encourage you to register and ask! Thanks again Mr. Brett! Anyone else feel free to chime in as well.

Josh S.'s Comment
member avatar

I would strongly consider Prime if I were you. I started with them on February 9th of this year. You only pay 100 up front for their processing fee. They put you up in their hotel and provide 3 meals a day for your first week. I left February 15th with my trainer and tested out March 1st for my license. During that time Prime offers a 200/week advance that is paid back at 25/week with no interest. As of march 1st I became an actual Prime employee and started earning a minimum of 700/week during my TNT training. One week I actually cleared 1000 because we ran 7k miles and anything over 5k miles is extra pay. I went solo 2 weeks ago and while your correct about .38cpm as base pay, they offer .05cpm extra for driving a light weight which makes pay .43 CPM. The light weight isn't actually that bad as far as space and that adds up to around an extra 500/month with the extra pay. This week I should once again clear around a grand and its only my second week solo. The thing to keep on mind is in this industry you are the key deciding factor in your pay check. I always try to have hours available as well as avoiding starting my clock if possible. I also sweep out my trailer as soon as I get to a truck stop after being unloaded. It sounds like have the drive to work hard so I think you can do very well no matter where you go in this industry.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

You broke my heart when you said you're turning 21 in July. I was fixin' to recruit you as my PSD student. But man, you will do great whichever company you choose. It's great to see another youngster with a head on their shoulder.

Keep up the good attitude, you'll do great!

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Deonte M.'s Comment
member avatar

I would strongly consider Prime if I were you. I started with them on February 9th of this year. You only pay 100 up front for their processing fee. They put you up in their hotel and provide 3 meals a day for your first week. I left February 15th with my trainer and tested out March 1st for my license. During that time Prime offers a 200/week advance that is paid back at 25/week with no interest. As of march 1st I became an actual Prime employee and started earning a minimum of 700/week during my TNT training. One week I actually cleared 1000 because we ran 7k miles and anything over 5k miles is extra pay. I went solo 2 weeks ago and while your correct about .38cpm as base pay, they offer .05cpm extra for driving a light weight which makes pay .43 CPM. The light weight isn't actually that bad as far as space and that adds up to around an extra 500/month with the extra pay. This week I should once again clear around a grand and its only my second week solo. The thing to keep on mind is in this industry you are the key deciding factor in your pay check. I always try to have hours available as well as avoiding starting my clock if possible. I also sweep out my trailer as soon as I get to a truck stop after being unloaded. It sounds like have the drive to work hard so I think you can do very well no matter where you go in this industry.

Out of the 3 prime is my favorite. Congrats on making it through the program. You are where I am trying to be. I'm saving my money now so I only have borrow as little as possible from prime. I wouldn't mind the light weight truck. I dont have many possessions anyway haha. But can you shed light on the fuel bonus and per diem pay? And yes hours are MAJOR and with the Qualcomm instead of paper logs its a mess sometimes. Ive been down in Orlando at Lane Foods they were unloading us during a 10 hour downtime. They took 9 hours ! And would not let us wait the extra hours. Needles to say our clock was reset and we had to sit another 10! This happened several times. But that's the name of the game and you have to do what you need to , to prevent that from happening as much as possible. Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Deonte M.'s Comment
member avatar

You broke my heart when you said you're turning 21 in July. I was fixin' to recruit you as my PSD student. But man, you will do great whichever company you choose. It's great to see another youngster with a head on their shoulder.

Keep up the good attitude, you'll do great!

Well the good thing is ill still be around in July if you dont have a recruit yet!dancing-banana.gif if you or your buddies are still around and looking for a recruit at the time and can help me get into prime id definitely appreciate it! Truckers can network too!

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Josh S.'s Comment
member avatar

As far as per diem , I'm paid 35 CPM that is taxable and 8 CPM that is paid non taxable. Its considered travel allowance for eating out, etc. As far as fuel bonus Daniel B could tell you better than me, I haven't received it yet as solo. Should get it this next pay check though. Nice thing about our quallcom is you can off duty drive to the nearest truck stop so you dont lose your hrs toward completing your break.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Check out my thread below for details about Primes pay and fuel bonuses.

Prime Pay & Fuel Bonus

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