Groceries For Cheap On The Road!

Topic 9060 | Page 2

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Daniel's Comment
member avatar

Most of those things are very high sodium.

Where's the fruits & veggies?

I am sodium deficient! It doesn't bother me in the least. Lol. I crave salt like most people do sugar.

My body also rejects most of the commom vegetables & fruits you see advertised. This isn't a daily list for life; Just this week or two. I love cranberries, bananas, papayas, etc. Potatoes are an all time favorite. Beans too. Peanuts are delicious!!

How do you cook/heat the hot dogs, chili, etc. without a stove or a microwave? Sunlight and a magnifying glass?

Heating food up? For what? Hot food, cold food.. Makes no difference.

Your body craves warm food due to instinct (a fresh bloody kill). I am indifferent.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jessica A-M's Comment
member avatar

Most of those things are very high sodium.

Where's the fruits & veggies?

I am sodium deficient! It doesn't bother me in the least. Lol. I crave salt like most people do sugar.

My body also rejects most of the common vegetables & fruits you see advertised. This isn't a daily list for life; Just this week or two. I love cranberries, bananas, papayas, etc. Potatoes are an all time favorite. Beans too. Peanuts are delicious!!

Your body craves warm food due to instinct (a fresh bloody kill). I am indifferent.

Besides obvious mouthfeel differences, our bodies like cooked foods because they are easier to digest. Cooking breaks down fibers in veggies and meats to make them more digestible and easier to chew. Our teeth aren't made to rip through most parts of a fresh kill. We can't break through tendons or gristle easily like a carnivore can.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

This is one of the biggest things thats on my mind as i am just starting out. I have no idea what kind of amenities are gonna be in the truck n im kind of broke so yeah im not sure how to start out. I really want to eat relatively healthy while on the road but im thinking until i actually get my truck i wont really be able to.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Sun King, I drive for Knight and I use a 120 volt Crock Pot with a 400 watt inverter that plugs into the 12 volt receptacle. You can do all kind of creative things with that method. Just recently I purchased some Cornish hens at the grocery and roasted one of them in the Crock Pot with some onions, garlic, and carrots in there also to add some flavor. The other one I put in with three cups of water some coarsely chopped onion, chopped garlic, chopped celery, and some carrots. I let it stew in the pot as I drove most of the day. Then when I took my thirty minute break I removed the bird and de-boned it adding the meat back into the broth. I then chopped up some link sausage that I had left over in the 12 volt Koolatron, threw in some noodles and let them cook for the rest of my day. At the end of the day I enjoyed some really tasty homemade soup!

Here's what it looked like in the morning when I first started it:

truck driver cooking in crockpot in truck on the road

And then at the end of the day it looked like this:

truck driver cooking in crockpot in truck on the road

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

This classic is still in print:
Manifold Destiny
51rGWNJurXL._SY400_.jpg

Wow, I had completely forgotten about the time when my dad cooked a meal under the hood as we drove a hundred miles to a lake to fish! My mom thought he was nuts. She didn't say that, but there's this certain look she have him on a few rare occasions where we all knew she thought he had gone completely mad.

I'm thinking about whether I could fit a turkey under the hood of my Freightliner. I love roast turkey with stuffing any time of year.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Here's another specifically for truckers.

trucker cookbook the art of manifold cooking

People will see me in the fuel lane with my hood up and think, "Oh, he's checking his engine and stuff... you know, pre-tripping."

truck driver with hood up cooking on engine manifold

I'll be thinking, "160° is close enough, guess I'm stopping here tonight."

truck driver with hood up cooking on engine manifold

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

I'm wondering, if DOT pulled you in for an inspection, would that be legal? Not to be the party pooper here, just an honest question

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm wondering, if DOT pulled you in for an inspection, would that be legal? Not to be the party pooper here, just an honest question

I don't know, but I bet I could've won over the last guy who inspected my truck with a couple of slices of roast beef or a turkey drumstick.

smile.gif

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Sun King's Comment
member avatar

Sun King, I drive for Knight and I use a 120 volt Crock Pot with a 400 watt inverter that plugs into the 12 volt receptacle. You can do all kind of creative things with that method. Just recently I purchased some Cornish hens at the grocery and roasted one of them in the Crock Pot with some onions, garlic, and carrots in there also to add some flavor. The other one I put in with three cups of water some coarsely chopped onion, chopped garlic, chopped celery, and some carrots. I let it stew in the pot as I drove most of the day. Then when I took my thirty minute break I removed the bird and de-boned it adding the meat back into the broth. I then chopped up some link sausage that I had left over in the 12 volt Koolatron, threw in some noodles and let them cook for the rest of my day. At the end of the day I enjoyed some really tasty homemade soup!

That looks great Old School! A couple questions: What size is your crock pot? That doesn't look like a whole cornish hen unless they are smaller than the rotisserie chicken size I am thinking of. Do you cook with leftovers in mind, or enough for that meal?

I am planning on using a standard cooler in the beginning and going from there. Freezing a cornish hen to help with cooling seems like a grand plan to me.

smile.gif

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Sun King, I think the Crock Pot is a 2.5 quart size. It is small enough to work in the truck and it was under 15 dollars at Wal Mart.

The Cornish hen is actually a Bantam breed of chicken that is bred for it's superior meat quality. If you don't know, Bantam chickens are a diminutive little bird, about half the size of a regular chicken. My daughter and I raised some Bantams on our farm along with our other chickens, and they were a lot of fun. There's you some chicken trivia from a guy who really enjoys raising them. In the grocery they are usually found in the frozen foods. They are not big sellers due to their small size, so you won't find them fresh. They are ideal for the truck, and a one person meal. Usually they are found two birds to a package.

leftovers are easily handled with the Crock Pot. I simply put the crock in the cooler with the lid on it. The next day you pull it out of the cooler and put it into the base. I will usually give it an hour or so before I turn on the cooker just to let the crock warm a little before applying the heat to it. I don't really know if it would crack or not, but that is just my personal habit.

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