Information Overload

Topic 9447 | Page 1

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JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I dont really have anyone else to vent to so i figured id do it here. I can not believe how much you have to know to be a truck driver, i mean i knew it was alot more than just driving and holding a steering wheel but holy crap. Im into my second day of orientation and i feel like my head is going to explode from all the information im trying to cram in there. And we havent even started learning trip planning yet.

My biggest concern is the progressive shift they are trying to teach us, i already am a little unsteady with my shifting and now i have to do it faster and smoother. I could understand if ive been driving a month or so but i just got my license last week.

It is unbelievable the amount of information in the atlas too we have spent 2 afternoons working on that and there is still more we have to learn. This experience is really eye opening, i just hope i can do well enough to land the job.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Man we know what you're sayin. Everyone feels that way in the beginning because the schools and companies are indeed trying to cram as much information as possible into your brain.

Now I see you did quite a bit of the High Road Training Program but you basically stopped after the permit part of it. You barely touched the logbook section and never did the Weight & Balance section at all. Now you're getting ready to go out on the road and you're going to have to know that stuff too!

shocked.png

Hang in there man.

And for everyone else that's getting ready to get started in trucking, you'd better listen closely to what JakeBreak is saying and prepare yourself now for it. You're going to have to know a ton of information. The easy way to learn it is ahead of time, at home, using The High Road. The hard way is to learn it once you're already out there.

Here's how our training program breaks down:

To Get Your CDL Permit:

  • Rules & Regulations
  • Driving Safely
  • Transporting Cargo Safely
  • Air Brakes
  • Combination Vehicles
  • Pre-Trip Inspection
  • Driving Exam

To get your CDL endorsements which are optional but highly recommend:

  • Transporting Passengers
  • Doubles And Triples
  • Tankers
  • Hazardous Materials

Two sections we've built ourselves with info you'll need for everyday life on the road:

  • Logbook
  • Weight & Balance

Two sections for anyone considering flatbed:

  • Cargo Securement
  • New York State Coil Endorsement

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Maverick (Tom H).'s Comment
member avatar

Man we know what you're sayin. Everyone feels that way in the beginning because the schools and companies are indeed trying to cram as much information as possible into your brain.

Now I see you did quite a bit of the High Road Training Program but you basically stopped after the permit part of it. You barely touched the logbook section and never did the Weight & Balance section at all. Now you're getting ready to go out on the road and you're going to have to know that stuff too!

shocked.png

Hang in there man.

And for everyone else that's getting ready to get started in trucking, you'd better listen closely to what JakeBreak is saying and prepare yourself now for it. You're going to have to know a ton of information. The easy way to learn it is ahead of time, at home, using The High Road. The hard way is to learn it once you're already out there.

Here's how our training program breaks down:

To Get Your CDL Permit:

  • Rules & Regulations
  • Driving Safely
  • Transporting Cargo Safely
  • Air Brakes
  • Combination Vehicles
  • Pre-Trip Inspection
  • Driving Exam

To get your CDL endorsements which are optional but highly recommend:

  • Transporting Passengers
  • Doubles And Triples
  • Tankers
  • Hazardous Materials

Two sections we've built ourselves with info you'll need for everyday life on the road:

  • Logbook
  • Weight & Balance

Two sections for anyone considering flatbed:

  • Cargo Securement
  • New York State Coil Endorsement

I agree Brett after doing the high road twice I was so prepared for school and it made it a breeze I even picked up shifting quick and passed my permit test and all the exams for the license on the first try and now I'm on a mentors truck and having a blast. I can' thank you enough for putting this site together.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

Man we know what you're sayin. Everyone feels that way in the beginning because the schools and companies are indeed trying to cram as much information as possible into your brain.

Now I see you did quite a bit of the High Road Training Program but you basically stopped after the permit part of it. You barely touched the logbook section and never did the Weight & Balance section at all. Now you're getting ready to go out on the road and you're going to have to know that stuff too!

shocked.png

Hang in there man.

And for everyone else that's getting ready to get started in trucking, you'd better listen closely to what JakeBreak is saying and prepare yourself now for it. You're going to have to know a ton of information. The easy way to learn it is ahead of time, at home, using The High Road. The hard way is to learn it once you're already out there.

Yeah i stopped with the high road because i just dont get the split sleeper thing and it keeps halting me for that. I got busy with school and stuff and it just kind of fell to the background i had originally planned on going thru and doing the whole thing even the flatbed stuff just so i know it i might just have to skip the logbook section for now until i can wrap my head around the split sleeper thing.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Justin N.'s Comment
member avatar

I had no idea what the split sleeper thing was until I was into my second year of driving. Not understanding that part of trucking regulations should not cause you any problem getting your cdl. I do not think it is even on the permit test.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I had no idea what the split sleeper thing was until I was into my second year of driving. Not understanding that part of trucking regulations should not cause you any problem getting your cdl. I do not think it is even on the permit test.

Its not part of the test but it is a part of the high road training program. It seems like it would be helpful to know to be able to apply, but without understanding it ill just stick with a straight 10 hr break

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
Its not part of the test but it is a part of the high road training program. It seems like it would be helpful to know to be able to apply, but without understanding it ill just stick with a straight 10 hr break

First, Jake, yes, the split sleeper thing is like something from another planet. It has has been discussed here on Trucking Truth to no end. Do a search on "split sleeper" and you'll see.

As far as all that information that's thrown at you, It is a load. Book learning (the classroom stuff) has its place. One example is all the rules for Hours of service: 10 hours? or 11 hours? 14 hours? What does 70 hours in 8 days mean? This can drive you crazy.

But in a short while on the road, you will see how it all fits together.

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