May Or Prime Trucking To Start Out

Topic 9759 | Page 1

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Lady Lanes's Comment
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I am a female and want to take my husband on the road with me as a non-driving passenger (he has his own business going). It seems that May has some good benefits but Prime seems to pay more. As of now, I am siding with May because they have a guaranteed payment plan that you can choose for a year. My fear with Prime is that I might not get enough miles as a new driver once I finish training.

Does anyone have any suggestions about who I should go with? Also, if you know the positives and negative comparisons of both, I'd love to hear it. Thx all! Missed being on the forum the last couple of months.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

WarVenum's Comment
member avatar

May came to visit us in school. It's labeled as a "puppy mill" and they know it but things are turning around from what I have heard. They have a depot out of Denver and Idaho and have good western options...prime I don't know anything about but may is stepping up their game. If you want I have a recruiters card and can get you her info?

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

I am a female and want to take my husband on the road with me as a non-driving passenger (he has his own business going). It seems that May has some good benefits but Prime seems to pay more. As of now, I am siding with May because they have a guaranteed payment plan that you can choose for a year. My fear with Prime is that I might not get enough miles as a new driver once I finish training.

Does anyone have any suggestions about who I should go with? Also, if you know the positives and negative comparisons of both, I'd love to hear it. Thx all! Missed being on the forum the last couple of months.

I can tell you from experience with Prime that unless you are lazy you will get miles. I started there and I can tell you that when I was driving solo I was averaging about 2200 - 2700 most every week. Now I am not going to lie to you and tell you will not have short weeks because you will. As long as you are willing to run and be on time for pickup/delivery you should have no issues with getting miles every week.

Ernie

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Lady Lanes's Comment
member avatar

First of all, what is a "puppy mill". I have a guess but can you explain just in case I have the wrong idea? Also, not sure if I am going to go with May yet or not but I can give an update once I have decided and let you know. Would that be okay?

Lady Lanes's Comment
member avatar

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty Dog), do you know if Prime will allow me to take my husband along with me, even as a new driver in their lightweight trucks?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
First of all, what is a "puppy mill".

Lady Lane, if I were you I would just ignore Kevin's ill chosen choice of words in his statement above. All of the trucking companies who provide training for folks have all been accused as being "mills" - it is a derogatory word and I can't for the life of me figure out how people can be so ungrateful for a company who will absorb huge expenses to try and train people when they know in advance that most of them are not going to make it and they are going to loose large amounts of money in the process of just trying to gain a few good drivers from all their efforts.

We don't consider any of these training companies to be "mills". May has a great program, and so does Prime.

Prime will probably expect you to be out on the road more with less frequent home time than May, but they will also compensate you better for your trouble. We've had a lot of our folks in here go through Prime's program, and I have never seen any of them come back in here six months later complaining that they don't get the kind of miles they are needing.

If you like it out West, both of those companies have plenty of freight out that way - I'm pretty sure they both have a western regional run.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

Light weight trucks dont have a passenger seat.Only experience with may trucking was in a truck stop,in the pouring rain.I was trying to get back to my truck,and this hole,took his sweet time,blocking my path purposely.I just waved with a few fingers,as he left the lot.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Light weight trucks do have a passenger seat, but most drivers opt to have it removed so that they have room for a small refrigerator to sit in it's place.

Lady Lanes's Comment
member avatar

Thx Old School for your detailed reply. It seems that you are the most knowledgeable here, probably because you have been around so long (in this business). In the future I'm just wondering if I should just skip the forum and direct my question to you first. Lol!

I am still hoping to get some more responses but for now, it seems like Prime is the best company of the two. However,May is probably the best option for me starting out. We'll see if I have the same opinion once I get through school. I still have to enroll first. :-/

WarVenum's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

First of all, what is a "puppy mill".

double-quotes-end.png

Lady Lane, if I were you I would just ignore Kevin's ill chosen choice of words in his statement above. All of the trucking companies who provide training for folks have all been accused as being "mills" - it is a derogatory word and I can't for the life of me figure out how people can be so ungrateful for a company who will absorb huge expenses to try and train people when they know in advance that most of them are not going to make it and they are going to loose large amounts of money in the process of just trying to gain a few good drivers from all their efforts.

We don't consider any of these training companies to be "mills". May has a great program, and so does Prime.

Prime will probably expect you to be out on the road more with less frequent home time than May, but they will also compensate you better for your trouble. We've had a lot of our folks in here go through Prime's program, and I have never seen any of them come back in here six months later complaining that they don't get the kind of miles they are needing.

If you like it out West, both of those companies have plenty of freight out that way - I'm pretty sure they both have a western regional run.

Excuse me? I chose those words in quotes due to what the recruiter told me about what they are generally labeled as. Thanks. If you still want the recruiters information she is out of Denver and I would be more than happy to give you the information anytime you would like.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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