NEED ADVISE!!!!! Made To Drive While Sick And Dangerous Conditions.

Topic 9860 | Page 1

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Ms. Tomboy's Comment
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I exited a highway at 45 when posted limit was 20. Trainer said i could have killed us. I called fleet manager and safety to get help before getting on the highway again and they said the best way is with your trainer on the highway. I wanted just a few days or so on roads to get it down, but they just transferred me to another trainer and sent me out again. Was there for 3 days with no word or additional training. I had contracted the flu and severe lung infection, They said to deliver the load to WA-WI and we will "see about getting you medical attention". When on the 2nd truck I lost it on a hill and truck lost speed and I was almost going backwards out of control, or not in gear. I pulled to emergency lane and then started over again. I had the flu at this point and was told by my fleet manager to deliver the load i am under. I had a fever,vomiting (other stuff)and was still driving. i told them I needed medical attention, but still had to deliver till I could get aid. Verbally abusive trainers, two of them to be exact. And a trainer that was smoking illegal drugs. I reported him to the fleet manager and it was ignored and he was sent on another load!!! I am being called in to speak with the department head today........we will see what happens!

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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Wow. I mean, I don't even know what to say. I would begin by refusing to drive if you're that sick. Then of course I would demand to see a doctor right away. If you have to call an ambulance yourself, then do it. Get your health right first. There's no reason they can't figure out something else to do with the load you have so you can get some help.

Ms. Tomboy's Comment
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Wow. I mean, I don't even know what to say. I would begin by refusing to drive if you're that sick. Then of course I would demand to see a doctor right away. If you have to call an ambulance yourself, then do it. Get your health right first. There's no reason they can't figure out something else to do with the load you have so you can get some help.

I had a temp. of 103.7, fleet manager knew i was sick and still had me drive. So there has been verbal abuse, illness and safety issues that I am still trying to get help with. Hopefully I will do so when I get to the terminal to talk with dept. head. will respond with outcome later. Thanks.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
James U.'s Comment
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I dont understand why you continued to drive when you knew how sick you were. You put yourself and others in danger by being behind the wheel with a temp of 103. Most adults hullcinate over 101 and their brains and organs start to fail over 103. So your fleet manager who cant see you and isnt a doctor is to blame ??, I think not you should have gotten yourself to the nearest hospital. You need to be able to stand up for yourself and tell dispatch or your fleet manager "NO" it might be "NO" cause there is a massive blizzard, it might be "NO" cause your too sick, or it might be "NO" for anyother reason that would make it unsafe to drive, but you need to learn to say "NO" and stop looking for others to give you permission. Safety first what if you had caused an accident that left people hurt or worse.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

If your that sick...simply refuse to drive...expect to be fired...but it beats killing someone and doing 25 plus.

Ms. Tomboy's Comment
member avatar

Talked to department head about the verbal abuse, illegal drugs and down shifting issues. He was only concerned about me getting back on the road and addressed nothing else! Will get a road test only by Safety on Friday and back in the truck asap, according to him, that's all we needed to address.

I want to feel comfortable that I have it down before getting on the highway again. Ex-Trainer said I stole bag off truck and they never tested other trainer for the drugs!!!! Advise on who to talk to about these other issues, since dept. head isn't?????

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Talked to department head about the verbal abuse, illegal drugs and down shifting issues. He was only concerned about me getting back on the road and addressed nothing else! Will get a road test only by Safety on Friday and back in the truck asap, according to him, that's all we needed to address.

I want to feel comfortable that I have it down before getting on the highway again. Ex-Trainer said I stole bag off truck and they never tested other trainer for the drugs!!!! Advise on who to talk to about these other issues, since dept. head isn't?????

You told a manager, he may or may not be addressing those issues, but it's his call and his responsibility now, not yours. Document the conversation somewhere so you can remember the details and dates if it ever comes up again (like the stolen bag), and then move on. You don't have to deal with the trainers any more, right? Let it go.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Let it go.

That is some sage advice Ms. Tomboy. Bud is so right... I know it seems odd to you that they don't share your concerns, but it is a rookie truck driver situation that you are in that makes it different.

You are in training, and therefore they are always going to consider that you don't really know what you are talking about, after all the trainers have been there and already proven themselves. The best thing you can do is move forward and try your best to get past this training point. From that point on you will be on your own and you can start working on being a proven driver yourself. Performance is the name of the game in this industry. Hang in there and show them you can handle yourself out there on the road.

If you let this eat away at your resolve to become the best driver they have ever seen, it will mess up your chances at this career.

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

Trucking is not a 9 to 5 job if you get sick you can't call out but if you are that sick you can stop and seek medical attention... just send in a message to dispatch and simply state that your truck Is here and your going to the hospital don't ask them or they will try to get you to stay and Drive... you are the boss you know when there's something wrong not them...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Carl A.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow sounds like you got alot going on. Like normal (now dont take this the wrong way) theres allways two sides to a story and beings we only know your side I will go with that. Theres some many things that we experience as new drivers or are in training drivers and at times we can make things pretty dramatic,those things we see and expereience as new drivers. Like what one driver said ,dont wait for some one else to give you the answer cause if you do it might be to late. Believe it or not you and your health is the number one thing that comes before anything else when on the road. If your that sick, for goodness sakes dont drive, and if your trainer wont take you to the hospital,do like Brett said call a ambulance once ya get stopped.I dont care how many times dispatchers have had to deal with people being sick and were really not, it only takes one time for that one person who is truly sick end up seriously sick. Some say you could get fired, well I am not sure about that but if it came down to it and that company fired you well probably not the company to be working for. As far as losing power, or exiting to fast among other driving issues that you may have,well maybe a couple more weeks with a trainer(A good one) might be good for you. The issue with your trainer smoking something illegal, and the company not responding to that,well hmm something not right here. All in all , I hope your feeling better and can move on and get focused back onto becoming a professional freight re-locator.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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