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I Fulfilled State Required Hours and Completed the $4,000 Course but NO CDL

Topic 18236 | Page 2

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Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay so It basically was just a big complete waste of time and I can burn my certificate because I failed the one and only CDL test. I failed the parallel parking part of the skills test by 1 point.

I won't name the school I attended sorry.

Okay so at least there's hope still. I'll just have to do EVERYTHING OVER AGAIN... at a company sponsored training. I still have my permit and DOT med card and everything else.

The staff at the DMV is really tough, I wasn't the only one in the class who failed... the majority of us did to be honest.

Seriously though. Wish you WOULD name the school - unless you are planning future recourse against them. We need to be able to STEER PEOPLE CLEAR OF THEM. That's the purpose of this site - not to badmouth schools or companies - but to give potential new entrants to the industry an honest appraisal - based on the reported experience of other members.

So - you had a class of a few people - all of them spent $4K, took a one shot test - and most walked away with a WORTHLESS PIECE OF PAPER and $4K worth of DEBT? Wow - I need to open a driving school if it's that easy to take people money legally like that.

Did you get to practice the parallel and other "yard skills" to the point where you were confident enough to pass? If not confident enough - did the school make the extra time available to you so you could have a better shot at passing?

To get back to your original question - and not to sound overly harsh. Under your current circumstances, you would have to sign on with a company (or another school) as if the school you just finished and paid for - NEVER HAPPENED.

You have no CDL and a piece of paper that hints at completing a course of study, where your "Diploma" is a COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE - and the certificate they gave you merely states that you had some period of classroom and skills training that enabled you to OBTAIN THAT CDL.

I'd examine the contract and student manual to see if it actually states that you "only get one shot" at the skills test. Otherwise, you may have some actual recourse to get the to allow you to re-take the test. At least - I'd file a BBB complaint.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

There has to be either a shortage of information about this situation or a misunderstanding of some sort. I've never heard of a school that lets you take the test one time and if you fail you're on your own. They will normally let you practice for a few more days or a week before retesting once or twice in their trucks. Even if they charge a small extra fee and that was understood in the beginning that's ok.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

I don't have an answer but a thought. I'm sure there are plenty of professional experienced cdl holder's that had to take their test more than once. If I was in your shoes I would be embarrassed to go and talk to the school but I would still want to do it. That 4,000$ is not worth losing over a weakened pride.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bobby B.'s Comment
member avatar

Bobby, there seems to be something missing in your story.

In the first place I've never heard of anyone receiving their certificate without obtaining their CDL. What would be the point of that? That's like the school is proud to be advertising their failure rate!

If you are not assertive enough to get in there and get another chance at testing, you are going to have some serious issues with being successful in this career. Instead of asking us about Company-Sponsored Training Programs you ahould be putting your efforts into finding out from the school what it is that you need to do to test again. There is no way they have a standard policy of one and done. They would have a terrible failure rate, and that in itself would keep major carriers from being interested in hiring their students.

The whole purpose of the certificate is to show that you successfully passed the course.

You've never heard of it? So what, I'm sure there are plenty of things you've never heard of. What I said is how it is. I can post up my damn certificate, progress report, and signatures and things up right now if it wouldn't take so much time to blur out names and things.

Assertive enough? Running into the school screaming I want another test or my money back wouldn't do anything but get me escorted off the facility. Before you begin badgering and coming at my man-hood how about you provide some useful information to a guy that just got raped out of 4000 bucks. Isn't that the purpose of this forum...? I'm an outlier not damn outcast.

The school is through a community college and they don't brag about their passing rate. They repeat plenty times that they can't you promise you a CDL. I took my test and failed and another class began the following week. This is a high volume with many classes going about at one time. They have failures on the first try but they also have passers so it buffers.

It takes a truck to test, the trucks are full of newbies now with schedules and hours they have to accrue. Without a truck and maybe some cash for however much the dmv wants. I'm **** out of ****ing luck it seems.

Thanks alot.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobby B.'s Comment
member avatar

And it's not a scam. Some people didn't have to pay for the course because they got either scholarship through the school or some unemployment program or something. I personally paid 4,000 because I wasn't eligible for either.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

I didn't see where someone suggested running in yelling and screaming or insulting your man hood my bad. Although giving advice on a place we know nothing about is difficult.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

It sounds like it could have been a decent school. But with what your saying I'm hoping I will not end up there.if they would be willing to work with you possibly fitting you into another class it could be decent I would just like to know their response

Bobby B.'s Comment
member avatar

I didn't see where someone suggested running in yelling and screaming or insulting your man hood my bad. Although giving advice on a place we know nothing about is difficult.

I didn't quote you, so that means I wasn't directly speaking to you. Some people seem to believe simple assertion gets you whatever you want in life. It was sarcasm well deserved. I'm not posting the school name until I can come to a resolution.

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

I'm not taking offense to the conversation I don't really get into that. I also don't think anyone was trying to badger you was my point but I can't speak for anyone so I won't try. I also agree that assertion never normally works. I'm just trying to see from your view what your options are.? How do you plan on getting it resolved? Are you planning on talking to them, moving on ?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I don't even really want to address what all has been said in here with the exception of clarifying my comments about being assertive. There's no reason for me to get into this silly, hot headed, cat fight, but I do want other newbies who may read this little conversation in the future to understand one of the important factors to success in this much misunderstood business of trucking.

You do not need to scream and yell to be assertive, and there are times that you need to be assertive to get things accomplished. That old saying about drawing more flies with honey than vinegar is true in most cases. I never even dreamed of suggesting anything violent, or loud and crazy.

I can't even tell you how may times I get myself unloaded and on my way while other drivers are fuming in their trucks waiting in line to do the same. Why is that? Because I understand how you get things done. If you met me you would think I was the most quiet, boring, unassuming person you had ever come across. You would not really think of me as assertive.

The very reasons that Matt got the idea that I was going after his manhood indicate his willingness to assume things that are not really so. I can not answer for his school, since he refuses to give us the name, (which I think he knows we will make a few calls and verify the facts, if we had the name) but I have never heard of this scenario where a school is so ready and willing to fail it's students and then throw them to the curb with a certificate! That accomplishes nothing for the school's reputation, or the driver's career.

There is an art to getting things done in this business. There are so many types of people's that we deal with on a daily basis, and many of them are type A personalities that have to be finessed. The truth is that many of us drivers are Type A personalities ourselves, and we have to keep ourselves in check, because as much as we would like to lash out at some one at times, we know that it never works in this business.

I can only assume that there have been some facts purposely not revealed here, and unfortunately we will probably never get the truth.

One factor did come out quite by accident though, and I think we all saw that.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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