Podcast 10: Terminal Rats Are Derailing Trucking Careers

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Sneaky Pete's Comment
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I know I'm repeating what I previously put up in another post as well as what Brett, G-Town and several others have stated in many different ways, but I think it's important and can't be stressed enough, especially to new drivers: Attitude determines outcome. For the most part anyway.?ui=2&ik=b099ae2cd9&view=att&th=15af2900

Patrick C.'s Comment
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Ryan, I blew my back out. I have 2 "herniated" discs that have caused permanent nerve damage to my sciatic nerve roots. I have loss of sensation and weakness in my left leg. The reason to not become a mechanic is simple. I have never enjoyed turning wrenches. I love flying. To be a crew chief in the Army you have to be a mechanic. I fixed blackhawks for over 13 years. But, it was being a part of the aircrew is what I loved. After 3 years of Barbering and endless headaches from dealing with how the hair care profession operates, I took the pay cut and became a truck driver. I made 3X the money in less than half the time working as I make being a truck driver. But, it wasn't worth it to me.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ryan you are a genuine enigma to this forum. Despite all of your insults (like calling me a "Drooling Retard"), I am honestly and sincerely trying to make sense out of your replies to this thread and the one from over a year ago; almost impossible. If you actually want some help, we can definitely do that. However for the most part your replies have been argumentative, pseudo-knowledgeable, and insulting to us and the industry as a whole.

So thus far…"How is all that working out for you?"

Indeed a rhetorical question, but with all due respect you are your own worst enemy. I mean, you insulted the IQ of a soldier you barely know, a person who went to trucking school, got his CDL , trained with H.O. Wolding and is now a professional driver working through his first year of employment. He managed to do all of that since your last foray in this forum a year and 3 months ago. He doesn’t complain, is respectful and has figured it out. He helps newbies at this stage of his career, never rude, and is becoming rather proficient at it. I can also state without any doubt that Patrick is not a push-over and not a boot licker. Not even close. He took you to school Ryan without you realizing it, showing way more restraint than I would have. I am choosing Patrick as a singular-example; thus far he is the only member of this forum you have had one civil exchange with. My opinion; your expectations of this business and yourself are upside down and utterly fantastic. “What is the difference between you and Patrick?” Please ask yourself that question Ryan because he has something you covet and he figured out how to get it done without compromising his integrity or belief system. And the reason I know this; because I followed his threads/posts/replies from day-1, just like I have yours.

It’s a job Ryan…although unique, like any other, it requires give and take with an understanding and acceptance that "rookie-dues" must be paid…no getting around it. Fight it like a spoiled child, and you will fail. It’s inevitable. If you are unwilling to accept that basic premise, then you are wasting your time and ours with these high-jacking raids on solid advice and viable information that is free, no charge. If however you humble yourself just a wee-bit, accept that there needs to be more “give” than “take” with a rookie driver, we might be able to help you. You believe there needs to be change in this industry. If that's what you want, not gonna happen if you are an outsider looking in. But honestly dude? You gotta f***in' chill on the insults and the belligerent behavior, otherwise no one capable, will be willing to help you. We'll ignore you...

Here is my "oversimplified" take on this. On one hand you state rather clearly and I quote:

I want to be a truck driver

You have said that more than once. Okay great, simple. Do you really mean it though? We all started at the exact same place and we all maintain that desire otherwise we wouldn’t be here. However on the other hand you then say things like this:

My trucking school simply didn't seem to care about any of their blatant failures, and I have this nagging feeling already that the industry is full of idiots.
Maybe they're sitting around complaining because no one is giving them loads because some “******bag” in charge of them doesn't like them? Or maybe their company really is incompetent and has major issues?
No truck driver should have to kiss some idiot's behind to get a decent load and do well.
I want to be a truck driver, and I don't need people enabling expectations of being a sycophant towards management in order to do well.

The above list is just a few of your most recent, choice comments. I could easily address each and every one to refute your false belief system. But it's not worth it and won't prove anything. You basically want to be part of an industry that you have already written off and seem to make every excuse imaginable to support your pre-programmed failure. If that's not the case, then WTF don't you get honest with us and yourself. You have referenced the word sycophant four times. Neither Brett, or I or anyone else has suggested you must be a boot-licker to be successful at this. What is repeatedly suggested is being respectful, professional and while maintaining a genuine commitment to learning and driving safely. All of that is required and necessary to get the job done with a minimal amount of pain. If you approach this with a positive attitude and not assume the entire trucking world is conspiring to enable your failure,…you might set yourself up to succeed.

Just to be crystal clear,…you want to insult and argue with me, we’re done, never again will I reply to anything you write. You will be ignored...

However if you check your ego and consider all the options we might suggest or recommend, then we can have further discussions. I and many others on this forum know how to get where you want to be. Not that you asked, but I truly believe based on where you are at right now? Company-Sponsored Training Programs is where you should focus your attention, cause the other route isn't working for you.

Up to you…call it a cross-road; this is either our first or last discussion.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town,

Saying you can easily refute things I say, without refuting any of it, boils down to posturing. You managed to take the time to say a lot, but it's preaching. I'm sure it looks good to people that already see things the way you do. I teased Patrick because he teased me first, but in your demented little way of thinking, that's ok because he's an established member, and he's supporting your viewpoint on things. I actually ignored the people I really found stupid. :)

You want those entering the industry to think that the status quo is something to aspire to falling into line with instead of wanting better than the cesspool it often is. Anyway, we are oil and water, and I want to hear your take on things probably about as much as you want to hear mine. It isn't psuedo-knowledge that I know the DMV has different standards at different locations. I experienced it first hand because the second school I went to uses a different DMV. The handbook, the DMV, and various schools are not on the same page. I find it incredibly obnoxious that the people in the industry are so weak minded as to let such discrepancies slip, and that all the people being pushed through the broken system are so willing to submit to it, as to not make a scene and lessen their chances of getting through it. I actually confronted the DMV minions with their actual handbook and read it to them, challenging them to show me evidence of my basis for failure. They could not. Then I contacted the guy that was head of the federal hanbook, and challenged him with the same thing. He could not. Further, I can prove that truck drivers, on average, have very low scores on aptitude testing. I can also show you a sea of people claiming they've been screwed over by the industry, but the ridiculous theme here is to blame the victims. It's their own fault, look at their ****y attitude, after they got screwed over! *rolls eyes*

My opinions of such a nature are firmly grounded on a lot of data, and I am not one bit humble about it. I am good at such things. In contrast, I'm happy to admit much incompetence at driving a truck. I wish to fix that, but I have to navigate this sea of filth to get good... and even when that happens, it doesn't mean much in terms of my ability to make money at it. I also believe that, at the very least, Brett knows there is a truth to viewpoints - he just doesn't find them pragmatic enough.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
In contrast, I'm happy to admit much incompetence at driving a truck. I wish to fix that, but I have to navigate this sea of filth to get good... and even when that happens, it doesn't mean much in terms of my ability to make money at it.

Please Ryan, why are you wasting your time with us?

You clearly are convinced that we don't have a clue as how to navigate the "sea" that is before you, or that it's even worthy of your efforts.

How is it that we could possibly be of any help to you?

Maybe you just fell upon a group of people who have passed through that "sea" and are living large, so now you'd like to emulate them? That doesn't make sense either or it seems you'd at least consider their advice.

I don't know. You're very mysterious to me.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ryan...I feel just a little bit sorry for you. Cannot see the woods for the trees.

You respect no boundary no matter how obvious or clear; "chill on the f**kin insults" is what I asked. Can't help yourself, had to throw me under the bus, make it personal in order to make your point, elevating yourself above the feckless perception that I am mentally challenged. No idea... I don't have the time, desire or inclination to debate you...no interest, better things to do with my time, like earning a living and helping folks who actually want and need the help. Who have you helped today Ryan? Besides I know better than to infinitely fight with a pig in the mud (you),...'cause the pig likes it.

You either want our help or not. Binary, positive or negative, 1 or 0. Your choice, not mine. You have made it abundantly clear that your true interest is showing us how much "you know", and pointing out in a belittling and demeaning fashion how little "we" or "I know". Yet...continue to fail miserably at the most basic part of this whole process and insult the very people on this forum who actually "give a crap" enough to try and help you. No idea what you really want (maybe total affirmation), but you are not going to get it from this forum. This is no game or stunt for us Ryan, it's our livelihood, it's dangerous as all hell, puts food on the table and clothes on our backs.

I don't want to speak for Brett, but the truth I believe he "knows" about you? Your horrible, arrogant and superior attitude is destroying any realistic possibility of you ever becoming a tractor trailer driver and preventing you from lowering your lofty standards in order to work with the peasants who occupy the trucking industry cesspool. I think that about sums it up with a run-on sentence. Just to prove my point, I will hit the red report key (lower right), pinging Brett to look at this reply...he can deal with you now, if he cares to, cause as they say in The Shark Tank..."I'm out".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

I posted in here because I was provoked by what was said. It wasn't for help, and it wasn't to try to show, "what I know". I just felt it wasn't a fair summary of the situation.

I am actually trying to decide what my next step will be. I haven't decided if I want to return to the school I already paid for that guarantees a pass or not. I mostly sit around there all day watching other people drive a truck, the truck is in bad shape, and I have no confidence in the trainer. With the duration it takes to get a DMV appointment, and knowing how a person can fail because the DMV has arbitrary requirements (depending on location and examiner) I can't even expect to pass in any reasonable amount of time.

I was pondering company sponsored training since they tend to get their own DMV examiner, and things move a lot faster, but I'm also on the fence about that since I've read a lot of bad stories. So if you actually want to help me, what would you recommend? :P What company has the best school? I mean, I know this website has reviews on schools, but it's not particularly critical, and even CR England looks good.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Well Ryan R., I would recommend looking at TMC if you want flatbed or Melton or even Swift. Swift actually has several types of freight you can haul, some of which are dry van , I believe reefer , flatbed, intermodal , specialized and a few more! I have studied on them quite a bit because I like the idea and the capability of switching freight when I want a little variety, just a thought! Have you checked into Prime or Schneider? They are a couple really good companies. Oh, and I also wanted to mention Stevens Transport. Good luck in decidinggood-luck.gifgood-luck.gif

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

G-town, thank you for your compliments. Your praise does mean a lot. I didn't get a whole lot of miles the first 3 months. But thru always being early and busting my butt, I now consistently get decent miles. I know it isn't always 3k a week, but I have went from 2,200 in a week to 2,800 in a week on average. Most of my runs I get now are in the 600-800 mile long range. Sometime I will get 2 shorter runs in 1 day (200-400 miles each), on weekends I usually get a run in the 800-1200 mile range. Take today as an example. I finished out my run from yesterday (I drove from Haubstadt, IN to Lebanon, TN today); jogged over to Nashville P/U and delivered in Cherokee, AL. Grabbed another load and headed back to Lebanon, TN. I got in just shy of 600 miles, had a live unload, a live load, and 1 D&H. I am averaging just over 500 miles a day for this week.

Sorry for tooting my own horn. I just feel like I am doing fairly well. Sat/Sun will kill my average though. Since my weekend load is only around 920 miles.

Drive Safe and God Speed

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

shocked.png

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