Seeks HOS Violation Info

Topic 19843 | Page 4

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G-Town's Comment
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Unholychaos wrote:

I probably missed the point you were making so let me paint the entire picture of that day from start to finish. I started my day at the service plaza in Allentown PA. I was facing the wrong way from a mistake I made the night prior by setting the GPS route to SB instead of NB which added a good 20m to my route. Right there is probably where things started to go down hill. I started my day as soon as I could at 0539, fueled/pretrip, drove as hard and safely as I could up to my delivery in Gorham ME, getting delayed in CT due to an accident around the Norwalk exits. This forced me to take a 30m break and be 32m late to my delivery. There were no clear signs on the building as to where the shipping/receiving office was, so I park at the first door I saw, ended up having to walk to the complete other side to check in, and all the way back. Probably another 10-15m delay there (all my fault). Docked quickly, got unloaded, deadheaded about 80m to next pickup, arrived early, you know the rest.

After retracing my steps while typing this, it's clear that I could have saved a lot of time by, for one, taking a few extra seconds and confirming that I put in the correct destination the night before, and going in the correct door at the delivery minimizing the check in time.

So there ya have it. Reason why I had to go over my hours was because of a negligent misclick I did the night before. Domino effect at it's finest I'd say...

Okay, so that's valuable, you definitely thought about it. That's really good. I remember the Allentown thing...I responded to that. Which company in Allentown was it?

Yes...that explains it alright. Anyway my point was; the night before you knew your next day was likely going to be a cluster. As a result I would have lined-up parking places along the route of delivery (after your live load in MA) that were something other than truck stops due to the time of day you would be finished at the shipper in MA. Walmart and Home Depot are always good places to start...

The other thing I suggest, is begin to build a DB of notes on Shipper/Receivers by Name or State; what their tendencies are, ingress/egress, and local places to shutdown. Can be handwritten or in some electronic form. This way in the event you return to any of these places, you'll know what to expect. I have a notebook on all of the Walmarts, SAMs and vendors I have visited. I frequently share this with other drivers at the DC. Very few surprises anymore...just the way most truckers like it.

Thanks for doing this UHC, helpful to all.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

Unholychaos wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

I probably missed the point you were making so let me paint the entire picture of that day from start to finish. I started my day at the service plaza in Allentown PA. I was facing the wrong way from a mistake I made the night prior by setting the GPS route to SB instead of NB which added a good 20m to my route. Right there is probably where things started to go down hill. I started my day as soon as I could at 0539, fueled/pretrip, drove as hard and safely as I could up to my delivery in Gorham ME, getting delayed in CT due to an accident around the Norwalk exits. This forced me to take a 30m break and be 32m late to my delivery. There were no clear signs on the building as to where the shipping/receiving office was, so I park at the first door I saw, ended up having to walk to the complete other side to check in, and all the way back. Probably another 10-15m delay there (all my fault). Docked quickly, got unloaded, deadheaded about 80m to next pickup, arrived early, you know the rest.

After retracing my steps while typing this, it's clear that I could have saved a lot of time by, for one, taking a few extra seconds and confirming that I put in the correct destination the night before, and going in the correct door at the delivery minimizing the check in time.

So there ya have it. Reason why I had to go over my hours was because of a negligent misclick I did the night before. Domino effect at it's finest I'd say...

double-quotes-end.png

Okay, so that's valuable, you definitely thought about it. That's really good. I remember the Allentown thing...I responded to that. Which company in Allentown was it?

Yes...that explains it alright. Anyway my point was; the night before you knew your next day was likely going to be a cluster. As a result I would have lined-up parking places along the route of delivery (after your live load in MA) that were something other than truck stops due to the time of day you would be finished at the shipper in MA. Walmart and Home Depot are always good places to start...

The other thing I suggest, is begin to build a DB of notes on Shipper/Receivers by Name or State; what their tendencies are, ingress/egress, and local places to shutdown. Can be handwritten or in some electronic form. This way in the event you return to any of these places, you'll know what to expect. I have a notebook on all of the Walmarts, SAMs and vendors I have visited. I frequently share this with other drivers at the DC. Very few surprises anymore...just the way most truckers like it.

Thanks for doing this UHC, helpful to all.

I delivered the load prior in Brenigsvilles (spelling) PA, and picked up at the Sam Adams Brewery in Allentown. Boy was that place a cluster and a half. Dropping my empty was tight, took about 20m cause I had to keep GOALing and cause I'm still crappy at backing most days.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Stacy M-Yellow Wolf's Comment
member avatar

Yes...that explains it alright. Anyway my point was; the night before you knew your next day was likely going to be a cluster. As a result I would have lined-up parking places along the route of delivery (after your live load in MA) that were something other than truck stops due to the time of day you would be finished at the shipper in MA. Walmart and Home Depot are always good places to start...

G-Town- When you are talking about places to park for the night like Walmart or Home Depot, do you need to get permission to park at these places from someone? Do you tell your dispatcher if you are parked other then at a Truck Stop (business, customer, rest area)? I have noticed that there are usually 1-3 trucks parked overnight each night in a shopping near my house ( there are currently no businesses leasing the end where they park)

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Yes...that explains it alright. Anyway my point was; the night before you knew your next day was likely going to be a cluster. As a result I would have lined-up parking places along the route of delivery (after your live load in MA) that were something other than truck stops due to the time of day you would be finished at the shipper in MA. Walmart and Home Depot are always good places to start...

double-quotes-end.png

G-Town- When you are talking about places to park for the night like Walmart or Home Depot, do you need to get permission to park at these places from someone? Do you tell your dispatcher if you are parked other then at a Truck Stop (business, customer, rest area)? I have noticed that there are usually 1-3 trucks parked overnight each night in a shopping near my house ( there are currently no businesses leasing the end where they park)

Trucking companies usually don't care as long as you are safely parked...not an on ramo or street and not breaking laws.

I always ask the manager of stores. Many I door shopping malls have security that will grant 24-48 hours permission. Walmart national policy is no parking...as stated on the signs "no semi". But the store managers USUALlY don't care especially if you spend money. Some have truck spots..but some have low clearance bars to keep us out.

Call ahead

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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