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Are Companies Putting Driver Facing Cameras In Their Trucks?

Topic 20321 | Page 3

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Big T's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to echo Susan here. It's their equipment. Why wouldn't they do everything they can to protect their assets? The MSRP for a 2018 Cascadia is $120,000. Add a trailer, satcom, and freight and the value can quickly get in the million dollar range depending on the freight in the box. Considering there are still idiots getting cell phone tickets I find it hard to believe companies cannot justify the cost of camera and monitoring it.

As far as alternative to a firearm: Three tools: your brain, tire thumper, and flashlight. Even when I'm carrying at home I dont put myself into situations that may create a situation in which I may have to use that tool. I don't walk in dark areas, I dont flash valuables, I stay aware of surroundings, and I make eye contact with everyone I can.

On the road I stay out of dark areas, I dont talk about my loads, and follow the rest of what I said above. I carry a small flashlight when walking around at night. When I'm inspecting my truck I have a tire thumper and a decent size flashlight. In the event a situation became life or death you can bet those are just as useful.

Number one rule is dont make yourself an easy target.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dan R.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't think that can be emphasized enough, Big T. Not just in this job, but in life.

Numerous times I've been in our terminal or a truck stop and I hear drivers talking about how they're on a beer load, load of smokes, even heard one guy talk about how he was hauling a load jewelry! That's just crazy to advertise anything like that. When I'm on a load, unless you bought or sold it, a dispatcher , or wearing a badge, the most you're ever going to know is where I am OR what I'm hauling, never both. Freight theft is significantly down at the moment, but there is no sense contributing to the risk that you'll become one of those statistics.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John M.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett I almost had to use those tissues in my pants, not just for my eyes, I laughed a long time!! Tissues for your issues, I will quote you some day lol. I don't get freaked by cams, I get freaked by clowns! Ask around, I am not alone in that. The "tire thumper" idea sounds good and as I keep diving and checking I am becoming less adverse to the idea of cams "looking" at me all day. Be careful what you say Brett, you get me laughing it's hard to stop me. Hope we don't meet and you get me ribbed, you will run. LMAO.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John M.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, you got it right, the guys name is Abe. How did you know?

John M.'s Comment
member avatar

Dan R. after reading what you said, if and when I start trucking I will let others know I am hauling "edible insects".

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Also, you got it right, the guys name is Abe. How did you know?

rofl-3.gif

I've been around a long time, man. It's my job to know what's going on in this industry and to help people understand the truth about how the trucking industry really works.

In fact, the reason this website is called TruckingTruth is because a massive percentage of everything you'll find on the Internet about trucking is simply not true. Most of it is people just like Abe who are trying to make others believe they're victims of abuse, when the truth is they either don't have what it takes or aren't willing to make the commitment required to thrive in this industry at a high level. So when they get fired, or they're embarrassed by their performance, or they're trying to get away with something, their primary tactic is to tell lies and make it look like someone else is the problem. That's what small-minded underperformers do, they screw up and then point the finger at someone else.

Unfortunately there's no shortage of those types on the Web. Fortunately we're here to set the record straight.

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Oh yeah.. Dear Abe. What a joke he was. They'll literally give anyone a YouTube account. Even my friend's cat has one.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

unfortunately cargo theft claims have been on the rise from what I see on my side of things

Brett I almost had to use those tissues in my pants, not just for my eyes, I laughed a long time!! Tissues for your issues, I will quote you some day lol. I don't get freaked by cams, I get freaked by clowns! Ask around, I am not alone in that. The "tire thumper" idea sounds good and as I keep diving and checking I am becoming less adverse to the idea of cams "looking" at me all day. Be careful what you say Brett, you get me laughing it's hard to stop me. Hope we don't meet and you get me ribbed, you will run. LMAO.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cornelius wrote:

unfortunately cargo theft claims have been on the rise from what I see on my side of things

This camera being discussed here, only covers the front of tractor and if driver facing, in-cab. Will not be able to detect anything going on behind the trailer. A really good lock can deter a thief, they will go for the path of least resistance.

Dan R.'s Comment
member avatar

My company also recommends backing up against a fence, the rear of another trailer, a wall, anything that will prevent the doors from being able to be opened. That, plus a nice lock and common sense, can make cargo theft pretty much a non-issue for you.

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