From OTR To Midwest Regional During Winter

Topic 20973 | Page 1

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Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

I personally decided, being that I'm still relatively green when it comes to driving a rig during the winter months, to return to being Midwest regional during the upcoming winter season. I messaged my DBL of my intentions, and he said I'd have to take a 2 cpm pay cut, assuming to get me down to the standard Midwest regional rate. I'd rather build up my confidence at least one more season of winter driving before feeling confident enough to tackle the eastern mountains in such conditions.

While I do have experience in winter conditions from last year, my career was very much in it's infancy at that point, so I feel this is the best decision for me right now. I'd rather take a pay cut and run with less risk/stress. Plus, it's only a few months out of the year; I have plenty of time in the warmer months to run my happy little *** off and recoup the overall loss.

Thoughts on my choice?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I don't have any problem with it. If that's what you're comfortable doing then that's the way to go. You're obviously thinking about your career from a long term perspective and that's always the wisest way to approach things, especially something as risky as truck driving.

I think it's a fine choice.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

What Brett said, but I do have to ask. Why a pay cut? Usually Regional is higher pay due to shorter runs.

Swift GLR/ Midwest pays .52cpm average run 450-500. I'm making more regional than I was OTR.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

You go with your gut. But Depending on what is defined as “midwest regional ,” you may experience just as difficult circumstances. I remember going through Pennsylvania mountains and snow with no problems, but was going from Illinois into Wisconsin and had to turn back because of ice. Schneider was okay with the load going a day later (when the ice melted).

Also, I can remember coming through a non-mountainous area (western NY into PA) where I very quickly learned what a “white out” really is. They call it “lake effect” snow.

When it comes to those mountains in the east, I say; respect the weather and the mountains and you’ll probably be okay. And you’ll get plenty of chances to descend the mountains “too slow,” but only one time will you go too fast.

Good luck, fair decision and know that YOU CAN overcome those challenges.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I used to live in western Michigan. You will find out what lake effect is. When snowfall is measured in feet not inches. LoL. We only got a dusting it was less than a foot. LoL

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Try the upper Midwest in winter.. Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, etc. Do whatever makes YOU comfortable.

It will be my 3rd winter out here and I'd be stupid to say I don't think about the winter driving before the season kicks in, because I do.

Just remember, it's easier to go slower than it is to stop in slick conditions, and if you are ever outside your comfort zone, get to a safe place and shut down til the roads are clear. Always notify your dispatch immediately.

Oh and you DO have a cb don't you? Always keep it on because knowing what's up ahead can save your life.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Last Shadow's Comment
member avatar

UC, that is one of the smartest thing a truck driver can do, I applaud your decision, I am green myself with less than two years and I am also taking the same approach, with me I will take a hit on my miles but I rather take that than go into a ditch or have an accident due to weather conditions from my end or some other driver out there, I plan to drive for a long time till I retire, and I won’t be able to do it if I don’t have my license or confidence, keep trucking my friends.

I personally decided, being that I'm still relatively green when it comes to driving a rig during the winter months, to return to being Midwest regional during the upcoming winter season. I messaged my DBL of my intentions, and he said I'd have to take a 2 cpm pay cut, assuming to get me down to the standard Midwest regional rate. I'd rather build up my confidence at least one more season of winter driving before feeling confident enough to tackle the eastern mountains in such conditions.

While I do have experience in winter conditions from last year, my career was very much in it's infancy at that point, so I feel this is the best decision for me right now. I'd rather take a pay cut and run with less risk/stress. Plus, it's only a few months out of the year; I have plenty of time in the warmer months to run my happy little *** off and recoup the overall loss.

Thoughts on my choice?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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