Do You Think I Can Get A Job?

Topic 21162 | Page 1

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Ironmonger's Comment
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Good morning. For the past few years, I've been considering becoming a regional truck driver, and I'm leaning towards Schneider's tanker division at the moment. However, I've had 6 jobs, which have all lasted less than a year due to medical reasons. Some even just a few days. However, I spent about half a year getting to the bottom of what was going on with my health and taking care of it, I typically get top marks in school, and I have a perfect driving record. Before I go much further with my plans, I'd like to know if I even stand a chance of landing a trucking job.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Big Scott's Comment
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What were the health reasons? Are the jobs verifiable? Over what time period were the jobs? How old are you? Can you explain and verify all time in between jobs? If Schneider is your first choice, you could ask the recruiter.

Ironmonger's Comment
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What were the health reasons? Are the jobs verifiable? Over what time period were the jobs? How old are you? Can you explain and verify all time in between jobs? If Schneider is your first choice, you could ask the recruiter.

I was dealing with severe mental health and digestive issues that put me in the hospital a few times. The jobs are all verifiable and were over the course of three years. I'm 22 as of time of posting, soon to be 23. All time in between jobs was spent on education and medical-related things. I actually have a CLP and a non-restricted medical examiner's certificate.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Do not be surprised if any company that takes an interest in you; requires you to get a letter stating from your doctor and/or psychiatrist that your previous medical conditions are properly treated and you have no residual issues.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Jared.

In addition to what has already been stated, please keep in mind you'll need to pass a physical before you are able to take the CLP (permit) exam.

In order to set realistic expectations, here is a series of links for you to review about the physical:

Trucking companies are also very strict about what types of medication(s) you are taking. Especially anything that is addictive and/or has side affects that can cause dizziness, dulled reflexes, and drowsiness.

Click on this link for more information: FMCSA disqualifying medications

Please let us know if you have any additional questions. We've had many people come through this link with health situations and have prevailed to become professional drivers.

Good luck!

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Hypertension:

Abnormally high blood pressure.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Jared, welcome to our forum!

Don't be surprised if you hit a few snags along the way to seeking employment in this new career choice of yours.

For starters you need to be aware that just about any company you go to work for will have you see their chosen physician for a new physical, and you will be given a new medical certificate. That is just standard procedure. With the medical issues you've mentioned to us you could possibly have an issue with your medications. I would try to speak to a recruiter if possible about your medicines, if any, and try to get those things approved up front. I can't guarantee the recruiter will have all the answers you need, but I would certainly try to start there. Different companies have differing policies concerning allowable medications for their driving associates.

Also you may want to seriously think about the effects of this career on your health. The two issues you mentioned can certainly be dealt with on the road, but they may prove to be very challenging at times. The Solitude of This Job often times catches newbies completely off guard. We often spend weeks at a time without ever even seeing anyone that we know. For some this is a soothing balm, while others cannot handle it at all. Being cooped up in a truck all by yourself for 14 - 16 hours a day can really get to some folks, while others will happily hide out in that truck like a hibernating bear for 24 hours a day, happy to not be bothered by human interaction.

Also it can be challenging to eat properly while out on the road. If you are suffering from anything like Crohn's or IBS, a poor diet could be problematic for you. A person can take the steps needed to ear properly out here, but it is a challenge that requires some good planning and forethought.

You made a good choice of joining in our discussions here, and I want you to know that we will always have your best interests at heart. We specialize in helping newbies get their feet wet in this career and we will always shoot straight with you.

Oh, one other thing that I think would be good for you to consider. In your situation I think it would be wise to look into the Company-Sponsored Training Programs. These are excellent training programs in which the company will pay for your training and will help you make a decent start at your new career. Some folks get all hung up about having to make a commitment to work for that employer for a year, but I don't see that as any different from making the commitment to paying for your schooling out of your own pocket. These programs have some definite advantages to them, one of which is that the company has a vested interest in your success. Do some research by following that link I provided you and jump back in here with any questions you may have. We will be glad to help you along the way.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ironmonger's Comment
member avatar

Thanks, everyone. I really appreciate the warm welcome and the helpful advice. I've done a lot of research into this over the years. Though, the main thing that's bothering me is the potential interview, particularly about my work history. I've never been that great with interviews and not raising red flags. There's supposed to be a way of spinning job hopping into something positive, but I'm not quite sure how to do that.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
the main thing that's bothering me is the potential interview, particularly about my work history.

Hey Jared, I wouldn't stress over that very much. Very few trucking jobs actually have an interview process at all. What is going to happen is you will fill out an application, and then a recruiter will contact you. If they have a few questions, and they probably will, they will simply ask you about those things over the phone and then they will do whatever they can to get you signed up. It is really that simple. Work history is mostly important because Homeland Security requires it to keep terrorist from getting in big trucks and doing some damage like they did with Jet Planes. There are a few companies that put more emphasis on job history, but if one rejects you because of it you can be assured that others will gladly take you.

We even make it easy for you to apply to several different companies with one application when you Apply For Truck Driving Jobs here.

You can also apply to several different company sponsored programs when you Apply For Company-Sponsored Training here.

Don't let that sketchy job history bother you too much, there have been a lot of people who jumped into trucking because they had trouble keeping regular type jobs. Seriously, you should be good.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jared above all else provide the facts. Your employment history can be truthfully explained by interjecting a temporary health issue that is now well managed. Some companies may accept this explanation, some may not.

Trucking companies do not typically conduct conventional job interviews, the kind you are accustom to.

Take a look at this link: The World's Longest Job Interview

Yes they will prequalify through on-line applications and at least one recruiter discussion. Just make sure you are prepared with all of your job and driving history. Relax...it's not a stressful exchange, just information gathering.

You may also benefit from Trucking Truth's starter kit, both a primer for your knowledge base and an online training program that has unrivaled success rates to help students pass the CLP exam.

Happy Reading!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

The article about the longest interview is absolute truth. There isn't any sit down meet your boss interview to be had. Everything you do is being evaluated.

I went to a college course. One of my instructors had worked for Wolding. They did contact him to find out more about me. They e-mailed him my prehire letter so he could print it off and hand it to me. As Brett stated in his book, the recruiter asked for the 3 best students. Now you have a chance at a job.

Everything you do, everything you say, the way you carry yourself and the way you dress is all being evaluated. During orientation you don't get extended a job offer until the end. You will spend a week being evaluated before you are even offered a job. At any time, if the company doesn't like what they see, you will get a return ticket on the grey dog.

Remember, the company is taking a chance on an untested raw rookie. They want to know that you are honest. You will be driving a $80,000+ piece of machinery and hauling cargo that can be potentially worth millions. They want to know you are punctual. You will have deadlines to meet. They want to know you can interact socially as a professional and dress appropriately. You will be the face of the company that the shippers and receivers will meet. They want to know you are capable and safety conscious. You will be driving a 80,000 lbs wrecking ball that will crush 2,500 lbs of plastic and aluminum and completely obliterate a squishy 200 lbs sack of flesh and bones.

Your interview starts the minute you begin chasing your cdl.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

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