HOS - Mindset And Practicality

Topic 21333 | Page 1

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OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
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Just want to put up a few things, opinion and practices, regarding Logbook Hours Of Service (HOS) management.

We are all "stuck" with the current version of FMCSA's take on the HOS rules. They are the Shepherd and we the sheep. It is what it is.

The Hours Of Service regulations are a "one size fits all" model covering a widely diverse and huge industry. That said, my points come from a newbie who happens to be part of the OTR reefer flock. I'm fortunate to run with a group who has a rather large footprint when it comes to lanes, resources and sheer volume of freight.

The Mindset For Managing Your Time

Priority is to make appointment times early if possible

Worry about my performance, not that of shippers or receivers

Sometimes I have to wake up when I don't want to and rest when I don't feel like it

I drive when I'm tired. Not when dangerously exhausted of course!

Be a "go to driver" (that's just being a solid team player and keeping the whining to myself)

Anticipate changes and remain flexible

The Practice Of Managing Your Time

Try to stay ahead of the clock so to speak

Check and double check ALL load information. If something doesn't make sense ask somebody

Always attempt to have downtime (sleep/break) at receiver and/or shipper. * This takes a lot of advance work I.e. Google earth shots of location, phone calls, communication with dispatch and other drivers etc etc * This also calls for a stocked fridge, slow cooker, coffee pot and toilet paper..😬

Practice the old saying of "keep drivers door closed and wheels turning".. I can stop and see South Dakota's Corn Palace some other time when not working!

Shower and shop during the DOT 30 min break

Make the potential for taking too many 34 resets your arch enemy. Avoid if at all possible. If you run hard/smart then you can stay away from these. 34 hour resets pay $0 to us and to the company (keep ahead of the clock)

Keep up on route planning, weather and potential delays

Lastly and probably one of the most important aspect of HOS management is having a dispatch group that understands your level of experience, capabilities and doesn't saddle you with unattainable time frames.

I image the more "seasoned" members of this forum can expound for us newbies!!..

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
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I forgot to mention one of my favorites. The 8/2 split. I have used this tool a few times and more to my advantage!!

Big Scott's Comment
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Excellent obsevations. Don't worry about the Corn Palace, it's much less than the signs say.

OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
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Hahaha, kinda figured. I guess thoes hwy side attractions bloomed at the beginning of the interstate system, Route 66 style. Stuckeys out West had "THE THING"....Saw it when I was a kid. A stuffed polar bear with black eyes if I can recall....Still in service I think.

Excellent obsevations. Don't worry about the Corn Palace, it's much less than the signs say.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Jim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the info. I'm currently studying the HOS on the High Road. It's kicking my butt, guess I'm a little slow with it. The 8/2 split really throws a kink in it, but I'm seeing when I get it figured out that It could be very advantageous or it could get me violated pretty quick. Still slated to start SWIFT Lewiston in Jan. The nerves are starting to kick in. Please keep pouring the info and comments out there. I'm sponging everything I can off this site.

I forgot to mention one of my favorites. The 8/2 split. I have used this tool a few times and more to my advantage!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar
Make the potential of to many 34 resets your arch enemy. Avoid if at all possible. If you run hard/smart then you can stay away from these. 34' S pay $0 for us and company (keep ahead of the clock)

I completely disagree. Sometimes, a 34 is necessary. Example: I picked up my current load on Saturday with 6.5 hours on my 11 hour clock in Bridgewater VA going to Rogers MN by the end of the day on Tuesday. 1200 miles, should take about 22 hours drive time to get there. I only had 18 hours left on my 70 hour clock. Ain't no way in hell I can make there with the hours I have, so I get a far as I can, pulled a personal record of 640 miles in 10 hours 34 minutes on Sunday, got to a kwik trip in Mauston WI, 34h reset, can start my day as early as 0400 Tuesday morning. Can easily make it there within the appt window, and now I have a full 70 to run hard and get home without having to worry about being short on recap hours.

Reyn R.'s Comment
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I completely disagree. Sometimes, a 34 is necessary. Example: I picked up my current load on Saturday with 6.5h on my 11 in Bridgewater VA going to Rogers MN by the end of the day on Tuesday. 1200m, should take about 22h drive time to get there. I only had 18h on my 70. Ain't no way in hell I can make there with the hours I have, so I get a far as I can, pulled a personal record of 640m in 10h 34m on Sunday, got to a kwik trip in Mauston WI, 34h reset, can start my day as early as 0400 Tuesday morning. Can easily make it there within the appt window, and now I have a full 70 to run hard and get home without having to worry about being short on recap hours.

@unholychaos: can you explain this further to understand how HOS work in real time? I’m guessing you drove the remaining 6.5 of your 11 on Sat. Set out early Sunday around 07:30. Pulled your personal record on Sunday & shutting down around 1800? Which then gave you the 34 hr reset until 0400 Tuesday. Is this correct?

Also, if you weren’t worried about home time, does it make better sense to get to the receiver early using recap hours, maybe the receiver accepts the load early & you can get another load in on that weeks check?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
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You can only do 70 hours in a week regardless. So whether you need a 34 hour reset or not, you aren't losing out. I like 34 hour resets to recharge, do my laundry and shopping, and get a hotel room.

Plus...if i only have 5 hours on my clock the last day or even 8, I'm limiting my miles and loads. If I restart the week with a full 70, i can run hard and have a greater selection of loads.

its often a matter of preference. some companies discourage 34 hour resets. I'll get mine in regardless lol

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Can't get home without at least a 34 reset son.

Team 1 Trucker's Comment
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As a newbie, I’m still confused by the 8/2 split and how to best take advantage of it. I’m constantly battling the clock (wether it be 11, 14 or 70) and searching for any ways to be more productive. Explanations, advice from veteran drivers is welcome.

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