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Are trucking companies switching to automatic transmissions?

Topic 4925 | Page 5

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I drove a stick for 9 years and an auto for 6 years with US Xpress. The autos were indeed very nice. You have full manual mode if you need it for special circumstances, otherwise you can eat a burger with one hand while steering with the other even in stop-n-go traffic. So I found less food fell on my lap using the auto.

rofl-3.gif

Seriously though, the overwhelming majority of large companies will go to autos as soon as one comes out that's economically feasible. Ten years ago I was certain we'd have automatics in 90% of the trucks on the road by now but the development of these transmissions has been slow. Building an automatic or auto-shift transmission isn't the problem. Building one that will hold up, is easy enough to work on, and is worth the added expense of buying and maintaining is the problem.

But once someone comes out with that killer automatic transmission pretty much all of the major companies will go to them. Ultimately it will wind up being just like four wheelers. The overwhelming majority of trucks will be automatics but some companies or individuals will take the option of using a manual transmission.

EASIER is better; such a stupid direction to go towards. Lets get rid of everything that is challenging.

They're not getting rid of manual transmissions because it's challenging. They'll go to automatics because it helps their bottom line. I can assure you it's not going to have a negative effect on drivers, which is what a lot of people fear. Salaries aren't going to go down or anything like that. It's simply another tool in the toolbox for companies to use to help them make money.

I double clutch almost all the time btw, don't like to float

I can't understand why that would be. Does your leg get bored? Maybe audio books might give your leg something more enjoyable to do than clutching for no reason, eh? Does your leg like Westerns? I recommend "Zane Grey: The Last Trail" - great story. It'll have your leg hoppin like a one-legged driver in an 18 speed!

smile.gif

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Brett, if he's driving with his Jake on all the time that may explain why he doesn't like floating gears.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

Brett, if he's driving with his Jake on all the time that may explain why he doesn't like floating gears.

I don't like floating gears because it wont pull out of gear very often even when I let the gas pedal off to relieve the pressure. It gets completely stuck in the lower gears sometimes. Even pressing the clutch pedal in slightly doesn't help take it out, so I have to press it down 2 inches instead. And then I'm double clutching again, so what's the point of floating if I can never make it a habbit? And the engine brake has nothing to do with it. It comes on after you shift.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Jon R.'s Comment
member avatar

Let me clarify a few things here folks ,,IE ...w/ ULTRA SHIFTS ...JAKE BRAKES ... it was advised to me to run the jake brake in a down hill operation so when you enter the down hill and the COMPUTER will automatically register this fact and engage the jake ....then when you pull the next hill and the COMPUTER registers the need for power it AUTOMATICALLY gives disengages the jake and puts the cruse in again ,,,in a manual trans you DONT use the jake when down shifting ,,,after 34 yrs driving I'm NOT STUPID ...! some guys do this to bring the engine RPMS down faster ..but I DONT ...!

( I went to a orientation w/ volvo ...Freightliner cascadia / ultrashift given @ co. I'm leased to "as a casual driver ") and what the rep told us ...this co. has many autos on the fleet ......the co. I drive for is leased to this bigger co. in idaho ,, hope this clarifies things for ya all ......

after a few comments on this feed bacK some seem to have gotten my comments out of CONTEXT ...so I decided to interject ......

I also said it would gain MPG gain ,,,and some times up to 8.0 MPG ...YES ....NO ARGUEMENT THERE .....!

I'm just a casual driver and only run 3-4 days a month due to a disability ,,,and can adapt to what ever is needed from me ..I like the autos BTW !!after a major rt shoulder surgery back in 2009 I like the no shift deal !!!.....

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Cleft Asunder, the reason it won't slip out of gear is because your RPM is not right - the jakes make your RPM fall off way too fast for you to float the gears easily. An experienced driver may be able to do it, but even they will have problems in those lower gears. I wish I could sit in the truck with you for a few minutes and show you a few shifting techniques - it would make your driving experience so much more enjoyable.

Float The Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

I can't understand why that would be. Does your leg get bored? Maybe audio books might give your leg something more enjoyable to do than clutching for no reason, eh? Does your leg like Westerns? I recommend "Zane Grey: The Last Trail" - great story. It'll have your leg hoppin like a one-legged driver in an 18 speed!

No it's because I like to. It provides a larger window to shift into since the pressure plate (being lifted slightly) and clutch disc springs work together to create a buffer between the flywheel and transmission components, lessening the strain on the transmission components mainly under heavy loads. Clutch wear is very minimal if you DC well, and because you're only pressing the pedal in 1-2 inches, the pressure plate diaphragm springs will hold up a long time. I think a company has serious priority issues if they are fascists about double clutching. A new driver who is good at DC but bad at floating will make that transmission so slacky over time. My instructors new cascadia was already clunky and slacky at 30,000 miles.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

Cleft Asunder, the reason it won't slip out of gear is because your RPM is not right - the jakes make your RPM fall off way too fast for you to float the gears easily. An experienced driver may be able to do it, but even they will have problems in those lower gears. I wish I could sit in the truck with you for a few minutes and show you a few shifting techniques - it would make your driving experience so much more enjoyable.

The issue isn't rpms falling too fast, I have no problem keeping up with rpms. The fork literally will not disengage even when I let off the gas so there's no strain. I literally gets stuck. This could be due to the mainshaft/countershaft issues. My transmission is not 100% perfect, it was abused by a previous driver. (it still feels really nice when double clutching though) So I can only float it cleanly

I wonder about that jake brake. Is it on, lowering the rpms, when I'm not touching that gas pedal?

Float The Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

I can't understand why that would be. Does your leg get bored? Maybe audio books might give your leg something more enjoyable to do than clutching for no reason, eh? Does your leg like Westerns? I recommend "Zane Grey: The Last Trail" - great story. It'll have your leg hoppin like a one-legged driver in an 18 speed!

double-quotes-end.png

No it's because I like to. It provides a larger window to shift into since the pressure plate (being lifted slightly) and clutch disc springs work together to create a buffer between the flywheel and transmission components, lessening the strain on the transmission components mainly under heavy loads. Clutch wear is very minimal if you DC well, and because you're only pressing the pedal in 1-2 inches, the pressure plate diaphragm springs will hold up a long time. I think a company has serious priority issues if they are fascists about double clutching. A new driver who is good at DC but bad at floating will make that transmission so slacky over time. My instructors new cascadia was already clunky and slacky at 30,000 miles.

Man, Cleft, usually when we hear something really stupid like your engine brakes always staying on we try to educate the new driver about what they're doing wrong. And that's clearly not working because you know much more than experienced drivers. So typically we just sit back and tell ourselves "He'll learn over time." But in this case the only way you'll learn is when you'll jackknife and then it will be too late.

Just remember that some of us are trainers too.

And the reason your trainers truck was clunky and slacky is because he has rookie drivers learning on it and every rookie drivers knows just how much they grind the gears.

And also, by using the clutch to shift gears you're actually using more parts. Floating gears properly, that means not being a dummy and having the engine brakes on all the time, is the best thing you can do for your truck when it comes to keeping it in good conditions.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I can't understand why that would be. Does your leg get bored? Maybe audio books might give your leg something more enjoyable to do than clutching for no reason, eh? Does your leg like Westerns? I recommend "Zane Grey: The Last Trail" - great story. It'll have your leg hoppin like a one-legged driver in an 18 speed!

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

No it's because I like to. It provides a larger window to shift into since the pressure plate (being lifted slightly) and clutch disc springs work together to create a buffer between the flywheel and transmission components, lessening the strain on the transmission components mainly under heavy loads. Clutch wear is very minimal if you DC well, and because you're only pressing the pedal in 1-2 inches, the pressure plate diaphragm springs will hold up a long time. I think a company has serious priority issues if they are fascists about double clutching. A new driver who is good at DC but bad at floating will make that transmission so slacky over time. My instructors new cascadia was already clunky and slacky at 30,000 miles.

double-quotes-end.png

Man, Cleft, usually when we hear something really stupid like your engine brakes always staying on we try to educate the new driver about what they're doing wrong. And that's clearly not working because you know much more than experienced drivers. So typically we just sit back and tell ourselves "He'll learn over time." But in this case the only way you'll learn is when you'll jackknife and then it will be too late.

Just remember that some of us are trainers too.

And the reason your trainers truck was clunky and slacky is because he has rookie drivers learning on it and every rookie drivers knows just how much they grind the gears.

And also, by using the clutch to shift gears you're actually using more parts. Floating gears properly, that means not being a dummy and having the engine brakes on all the time, is the best thing you can do for your truck when it comes to keeping it in good conditions.

Total veteran ego right there. I never implied I know it all. Explain to me why cruize control is set to turn on the engine brake at 4 mph after your set speed. Why would this feature exist if you aren't allowed to run the engine brake while cruising???

Also, the veterans are always disagreeing and contradicting each other but you make it sound like things are set in stone.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

And it confirms what I said on cummins website. The engine is designed to allow the mechanic to set the engine brake activation in relation to cruize control speed. So for example, you can set the EB to engage at 1mph after your CC set speed of 60. This proves

From cummins website:

Engine Brake Cruise Control Activation The Engine Brake Cruise Control Activation feature permits the Cruise Control feature to automatically engage the Engine Compression Brake should the selected vehicle speed be exceeded while the Cruise Control feature is controlling the engine. This reduces driver workload and thereby encourages use of the Cruise Control feature.

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