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What did you do before becoming a truck driver?

Topic 7924 | Page 22

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Chris (the chick)'s Comment
member avatar

I've been a bit all over the place... completed Accounting program (not CPA, to be clear -- so boring, but I had stuck it out as it was a year program and I thought I liked math enough!), gotten a phlebotomy certification, am a state-certified EMT, active volunteer firefighter and inactive volunteer EMT, was a "summer camp" instructor teaching sign language to kids and I currently do private "tutor"/teaching sessions with wide range of ages, have an A.A.S. in Art and had begun pursuing Fire Investigation on a certification level, as well as just completed B.A. in Forensic Psychology (from the A.A.S. in psychology -- yes, the A.A.S.'s were double majors). Might have forgotten something.

This is my break from scholarly studies, especially as I've been wanting to travel the country for a long time but financially was not able to... and to save up for grad school into Forensic Psychology (interested in criminal scene analysis/profiling). And at some point, pursue Interior Design. And possibly Architecture (they really should be joined studies). As well as finish the Fire Investigation certifications. Also, work on becoming a career Firefighter... and/or some sort of law enforcer, including parole officer.

Think I've had enough on my plate and on my to-do list so Weather Girl (meteorologist) stays on the cold back burner for now.

Sun King's Comment
member avatar

General Manager of a health club. Managed a team of about 45 employees and had membership base of over 4,000. It was pretty exhausting on a daily basis...plus, any of you who have been in sales know how the pressure NEVER stops. Hit a goal, and it's onto the next month with the same pressure. Nightly, weekend emails to check...I was over it. Working hard now to get my CDL permit and hopefully CDL within the next few weeks after that. Love to hear from anyone with similar experiences. Thanks!! Love this site.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
tarheel59's Comment
member avatar

I worked in retail for 7 years, i was in management. Got tired of that! Worked the next 17 years running a vending route. That company was sold and I was laid off. Worked as route salesman for a uniform company in Charlotte NC for 6 years. Worked for Wal Mart in DC, hated that. At current job as a Para/Transit Driver for 7 years. In 2009 went to truck driving school, but never went OTR , because of two sick parents. Took the Para/Transit job . Now trying to decide which company to go with for training and starting driving. 😂

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

MiniMegs's Comment
member avatar

As I type this, I'm sitting at my desk job, wishing I was behind the wheel instead. Desk jobs... ugh.

I joined the US Army straight outta high school, but was only in for 7 months, having become pregnant with my daughter. She was a blessing for sure; I wasn't much of soldier, though I'll continue to uphold my oath if the need should arise.

After being honorably discharged from the Army and having my baby girl, I worked as an office admin for a pharmeceutical company, but I was contracted with Pitney Bowes. That lasted 7 months. Again, desk jobs don't work out well for me. After that was some college; only 3 semesters before I dropped out/ burned out. Academics just ain't my thang.

I got a part-time job delivering with Pizza Hut (which I LOVED!), then started working at Kragen Auto Parts (now O'Reilly), mostly because I had plans to attend UTI to learn about wrenchin on diesel trucks and restoring classic cars. But I got pregnant with my son and that dream was derailed. I worked for Kragen & Pizza Hut simultaneously until I was 7-1/2 months pregnant. Yup, I worked 65 hours a week into my third trimester. I'm kind of a badass like that :D

After my son was born, I was brought onto Countrywide as a temp mailroom clerk, then hired as an admin assistant. That lasted about 6 months before I was laid off.

10 months of unemployment ended when I was hired to a call center job. I was the best on the floor of 30 agents and moved up to the help desk spot- techincally a promotion, just without a pay raise, but it meant I didn't have to sit in the queue and wait for calls! I was then recruited into a higher paying team of elite agents, which I took, but the management in that department was so awful I was done with it in less than 6 months.

15 months of unemployment followed. The economy had collapsed, nobody was hiring. I had no job, no money, no car, and nothing to lose. So I moved to Colorado on a crazy dare. It ended up being the best decision of my life.

It took a few months to find a job, but I picked up a temp gig working on a research assignment for a consulting company. Sadly, that ended rather abruptly (even the agency was shocked at how sudden it was; 12 of 30 people on the assignment were cut in the same day, 5 others the day after). With no job and no money, I had no rent. So no more Colorado. Goodbye Boulder, hello (again) Los Angeles. Sigh.

3 weeks after coming home, I got a temp assignment as an order entry clerk for a local tool company. 8 months later I was hired on, and 2-1/2 years after that I became the department manager. What a thankless position: barely a raise, 3 times the responsibility, and less than half the support from my boss. I quit 9 months later.

Within 3 weeks I had another temp gig, but I had graduated from a health coach training program, so temping was ideal- I was gonna use it as a bankroll to fund my coaching biz. Sadly, having a lot more money than I'd ever had before got the better of me, and when the assignment ended 6 months later, I was in deeper debt than when I'd started.

I drove for Uber for 4 months (which I also LOVED!) until I qualified for unemployment. Turns out working AND collecting unemployment meant I came in under every week (unemployment deducted 75% of my Uber earnings from the payouts, but I had to spend more than the difference to keep my car gassed up), so I stopped driving for Uber. Unemployment kept me afloat until it ran out 6 months later, so I applied for the job I have now, where I've been since this February. And once again, I'm slowly losing my mind with the monotony, the predictability, and the total lack of anything resembling advancement or opportunity.

My husband was a trucker back before we met, and he & I know a couple who ride together (he drives, she navs). Both he (my husband) & our friends have suggested we do the same thing- ride as a couple, if not a team- and it got me thinking: why couldn't I become a driver? Why can't I be a trucker?

And the only answer I had was... why not?! :D I've loved every job I've ever had as a driver (pizza delivery, auto parts delivery, people delivery lol), I've always wanted to travel, I prefer working alone, I love having a new challenge every day, and I have the full support of my husband, so... it's time for a change.

I'm working with a company-sponsored program right now; application is in and my interview is this Monday. I'm SUPER stoked and can't wait to get started!!!

Now, how do I tell my boss? smile.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Who cares about your boss...he's quite accustom to people resigning.

If you really are convinced you want to be an OTR trucker, I think the better question is;

How old are your children?

confused.gif

After noting the birth of your son and daughter, no mention of them. Not trying to be nosey or prying, but a big piece of your story seems to be missing.

Reality check, please read the below links:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Paul R.'s Comment
member avatar

I worked for 16 years as a training professional in 5 different companies in a manufacturing industry. I could never make a strong enough argument to show the decision-makers the value of more training-as with everything, they just wanted it now, cheap, and good. After a significant live event, I've decided to take the opportunity to pursue something new. While there's probably no where, short of living a subsistence-based life in the woods, that doesn't have some kind of hierarchical BS to deal with, I thought that if I pared down the elements of my work to me, truck, road, load, distance, and time, I might gain perspective on whether to go back, or keep doing the new thing. We'll see. Thanks for your time. pr

Navy Vet's Comment
member avatar

Military for 11 years, then corporate IT sales, then high end IT Hardware sales, then I was a principal hardware engineer, then I got out of IT and into politics, that was short lived! Now, I test tomorrow for my CDL. HAHAHA

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Uncle Buck's Comment
member avatar

First off I'm 45 and have wanted to drive since I was a kid. I had a grand father that drove, uncles that drove, and now my dad drives for his retirement job. I however took the college route which was a good decision just not really what I wanted. Got married had 3 kids and doing to whole family thing. I have 20 years in as a civil engineer, so yes I am in charge of some of that annoying construction you all drive through. I have 10 years to go before I can draw a pension and my plan is to retire into trucking at 55. I've read on here about lots of guys and gals not starting until later in their lives. I am just patiently waiting until the day I am behind the wheel and seeing the country through the windshield of a big shiny truck.

Lynn B.'s Comment
member avatar

Pet boarding and grooming last 15 years. Helped husband with lawn business for 3 years. Winn Dixie for 10 years, cashier to manager.

Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

I was in the Army for 17.5 years. 4.5 as infantry and the other 13 as a blackhawk mechanic/crewchief.

After being medically discharged I decided to become a barber. I am a licensed Master Barber in Tennessee. After 2 years of doing that, I am tired of dealing with being "self-employed". Namely dealing with having a 1099 instead of a W-2.

I am currently working at Wal Mart in produce as a filler job.

I finish school next week.

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