Ready To Go To Court

Topic 10239 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Patrick 's Comment
member avatar

After speaking with the U.S. DOT and the U.S. Department of Labor, I am ready to take Navajo Express to court for using intimidation and threats to make me drive longer hours and more miles. They told me that if I did not driver 10,000 miles a month I would be fired. I told them that the only concerns I have are picking up the load on time, and delivering it on time. How many miles it takes I don't care. Since I was threatened by intimidation the DOT and DOL both told me that comes under the title of abusive treatment of employees. Can anybody tell me if you have been told the same thing by your company? After driving for Swift, CR England and USA Truck, they never even brought that subject up.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

First of all let me just warn everyone to keep this clean because this is a real issue that a lot of newbies are going to want to know about.

Now Patrick, for starters let's be clear about a few things:

1) 2,500 miles per week is quite a reasonable request and can be done legally with ease.

2) Most people would love to have those kind of miles available every single week

3) I don't think you're going to help your career any by suing someone for asking you to do something that the Federal government has already deemed to be legal

4) Trucking is not a vacation and a company's big rig is not your personal recreational vehicle. From experience I would highly recommend an RV for recreational travelling

Your defense seems to be that you're always on time with loads. That's great. It's a goal everyone should strive for. But you're playing the "on time" card as if that's all they can ask of you and I'm afraid that's not the case. You can't just sit around and use their truck as a free home by delivering one or two loads per week on time. They have every right to expect a certain level of productivity out of you, especially considering the Federal government has already created guidelines for what is reasonable and legal.

But more than anything I'd really like to hear your expectations for yourself. You keep coming here complaining about Navajo's expectations of you being excessive but you haven't explained to us what your actual performance has been and what you feel should be fairly expected of you.

How many miles have you been turning on average per week and how many miles per week do you feel an over the road trucking company should reasonably be able to expect from their drivers?

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

If Patrick is smart, he'll say "I'm sorry but I can't comment on pending litigation," and then refer you to his attorney.

Then again, he did create the original post, so I assume he wants to discuss.

I do agree with Brett, you're not helping your future career any. And i sure hope you can afford quality representation, because you can bet that Navajo will have a team of lawyers.

Gladiator 76's Comment
member avatar

Patrick,

I hope this is a joke. Your previous posts about this seemed to indicate you weren't interested in making money and we're basically driving as a hobby. Didn't they ask you to actually start working, so you just quit? I don't recall you staying that you were threatened.....did you?

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

Here's the deal. Are you at the shipper and receiver early or on time?

Does Navajo give you assignments that you can make legally?

Are you sluffing off, by that I mean quitting early (have two or more hours on your 11) or starting late (starting well after your 10 hour break)?

Look, it is the nature of trucking. If you did quit, unless you can PROVE that they wanted you to break the law (unsafe driving, or drive over your hours), you might not have a case.

By driving, you said you do NOT care how many miles they give you. By that, I took it to mean that whether it is 5, 50, 500 or 1,000 miles, you'll take it.

Dave

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

I never had a major problem with Navajo. My FM or DM , I forget which, wanted me to deliver early. NOT a problem in and of itself, except the receiver did NOT take early delivery.

Another time I was on time/early to pick up. Well, I was ONE DAY too early, and the shipper blew me off, and Navajo, because I was parked under a tree (it somehow interfered with the Qualcomm), did NOT know where I was.

Other than that, I am NOT bitter with Navajo.

I probably would NOT go back with Navajo, as I clear at least $700, after taxes MOST weeks.

Dave

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jay R. R2-Detour 's Comment
member avatar

My dedicated route is 2,250 miles a week. And I have to do it in 5 days. Just sayin....

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm sorry but that's what's wrong with this country... People are quick to sue.... Shut up go to work and earn your keep just like everyone else....your job was to turn miles and Navajo gave you miles and you didn't turn enough... Suck it up buttercup you failed as a trucker now move on with what little pride you have left...

Tracey D.'s Comment
member avatar

So you had two incidences where you had to wait? And you are ready to sue them? Please tell me I am understanding this wrong! Isn't waiting at a shipper/receiver quite a normal part of this job?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

So you had two incidences where you had to wait? And you are ready to sue them? Please tell me I am understanding this wrong! Isn't waiting at a shipper/receiver quite a normal part of this job?

I think you are confusing ME with Patrick. I didn't have any MAJOR problems with Navajo, the time I was with them. I mentioned a couple of incidents, and I just took it in stride. I just happen to get lucky and find a job that paid better.

Dave

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Choosing A Trucking Company Dealing With The Boss Understanding The Laws
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More