My Prime Student Had An Accident

Topic 10844 | Page 1

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Daniel B.'s Comment
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Getting a year in trucking is tough, doing it accident free is even tougher. All it takes is one second of inattention and things could go bad.

My student had a preventative accident last night. We don't know if he will keep his job, but if he will then his training will be extended.

student trainee truck driver accident skirt and frame damage

Frame damage, skirt damage and the entire Right Weigh system need to be replaced on our trailer. The tanker that he hit got the worst of it. His tire was lodged underneath our trailer, and he pretty much lost the entire corner of his passenger side rear of trailer.

Remember folks, these trailers are as solid as a rock. From the point of impact, my student traveled approximately 10' before he finally stopped. He told me that he never felt anything the entire time. That right there shows you just how much of a powerhouse these machines are!

Also, watch your mirrors everyone. You are looking after over 70' of metal. Don't ever forget to check those mirrors. If you're not sure you can make your turn then don't try to. If you're in training, please wake up your trainer when you're unsure.

My student is a great student and he's definitely above average. I make this thread as a friendly reminder to everyone about how quickly things happen out here. Unfortunately he learned the hard way, don't make the same mistake. And while I have your attention, I always see people complaining about their trainers. Being a trainer is three times tougher than being a solo driver. Sometimes I tell myself that I can't wait to be solo again so I "can have it easy again". So instead of complaining about what you think your trainer does wrong, thank him for the sacrifices and risks he's taking to train you. Its a dangerous job out here, but few know how frightening it is to try to fall asleep with a student driving. So once again, thank your trainer even if he can be a bit of a nut sometimes.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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You never said what actually happened. Was he in a truck stop looking for parking?

Daniel B.'s Comment
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You never said what actually happened. Was he in a truck stop looking for parking?

Oops, he entered a Service Plaza in PA looking for a spot to pull over so we can switch drivers.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

You never said what actually happened. Was he in a truck stop looking for parking?

double-quotes-end.png

Oops, he entered a Service Plaza in PA looking for a spot to pull over so we can switch drivers.

Like you said, mirrors, mirrors, mirrors...looks like he attempted to nose into one of those diagonal TP plaza spots and cut it too tight. Really tough break. Glad no one was hurt.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel's student claims:

He told me that he never felt anything the entire time.

I just want to echo this. No, his student is not numb in a certain part of his body. I have run over curbs with the trailer, watched as the tandem wheels dropped off the curb, saw the trailer shake, and did not feel a thing up in the cab. I talk about "seat of the pants" driving, but rear tandem wheels is a place this doesn't work. It's all eyeballs in mirrors.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Daniel's student claims:

double-quotes-start.png

He told me that he never felt anything the entire time.

double-quotes-end.png

I just want to echo this. No, his student is not numb in a certain part of his body. I have run over curbs with the trailer, watched as the tandem wheels dropped off the curb, saw the trailer shake, and did not feel a thing up in the cab. I talk about "seat of the pants" driving, but rear tandem wheels is a place this doesn't work. It's all eyeballs in mirrors.

Amen. Treat your tandems like a little puppy off their leash...never let them out of your sight.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

So when you're talking about tandems for backing and in the examples above, are you only talking about the wheels farthest from the cab?

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

So when you're talking about tandems for backing and in the examples above, are you only talking about the wheels farthest from the cab?

Yes, trailer tandems.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

So when you're talking about tandems for backing and in the examples above, are you only talking about the wheels farthest from the cab?

That little book icon next to the word "tandems" gives the definition. Both axles back there make up the tandems.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Thanks. I did look up the definition using that little link, and I did a Google image search to be sure. But tandems are talked about for the trailer AND the cab, and I wanted to just make sure that I was understanding exactly what was being discussed. (I know the differences in terminology is also discussed in the little pop up box, but again, just making sure and trying to put it into a vocabulary I understand until this becomes part of my working vernacular.)

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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