Starting School

Topic 10901 | Page 1

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Team Staples's Comment
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Hey y'all. Here goes. On our way to O'Fallon IL to start school for Earl L. Henderson. We are so super excited. Of course my husband has driven before for about 10 years and got out of it for a while and now I am gonna do it with him, so I'm a little more nervous than him. Any calming words of advice for this rookie gal?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Believe it or not, the people who run into the biggest problems with their careers early on are people who come into the industry with a rigid set of expectations and strong opinions about pretty much everything. They expect to be treated a certain way, trained a certain way, and they think they have the entire process figured out in their head. Then they arrive for orientation and training, find out everything is completely different than they had imagined, and start believing that the company is disorganized or unprofessional.

So these student drivers start questioning everything. Why don't I get more time in the truck? Why do they keep changing our schedule around? Why aren't the instructors spending more time with us? Why do we spend so much time waiting on things? Why aren't they sending me out on the road sooner?

Before long they start getting an attitude and begin confronting the staff and drumming up discontent amongst the other students. Their attitude continues to sour, they get more confrontational with the staff, and before long they're on a bus headed home. Naturally they blame the company for their demise and begin hitting every website they can find to badmouth the company.

The best thing you can do is go in with a great attitude and an open mind. Whatever you expect, toss it aside and deal with whatever is in front of you instead. Just roll with it. Do what you're asked to do and do it with a smile. Someday you'll understand why things are done the way they are in this industry but in the beginning it's going to seem baffling. Don't sweat it. Just keep listening, learning, working hard, and do it all with a great attitude.

Here is some reading for you:

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey yall. Here goes. On our way to O'Fallon IL to start school for Earl L. Henderson. We are so super excited. Of course my husband has driven before for about 10 years and got out of it for a while and now I am gonna doit with him, so Im a lil more nervous than him. Any calming words of advice for this rookie gal?

Deep breaths, stay focused and listen to the people teaching you. I'll be there on the 26th, perhaps I'll catch you guys around the yard.

Team Staples's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hey yall. Here goes. On our way to O'Fallon IL to start school for Earl L. Henderson. We are so super excited. Of course my husband has driven before for about 10 years and got out of it for a while and now I am gonna doit with him, so Im a lil more nervous than him. Any calming words of advice for this rookie gal?

double-quotes-end.png

Deep breaths, stay focused and listen to the people teaching you. I'll be there on the 26th, perhaps I'll catch you guys around the yard.

Awesome. Maybe we will see each other. You coming alone?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

The following comments appear often here. Some may not actually apply to you. I won't provide answers here, my point is: It's not you, it's the way it works:

* We don't have enough time to get this down.

* 11 hours? 10 hours? 14 hours? When do I sleep, when do I drive?

* This d**n trailer won't back like I need it to! Arrrgh!

* Double clutch! Clutch-Neutral-Clutch-Shift. I can play the piano but I can't move my feet that fast!

* How do you fit this thing between the lane lines? It's too big!

* I did it once, but the 90° alley dock back-up is killing me!

* I need more time to ______________ (fill in the blank) before my CDL skills test!

- + - + - +
Michael's advice is about it.

For the pain of backing practice I've recommended getting a small toy semi-truck trailer from Walmart. It helps you visualize the truck-trailer relationships as you back up.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Hey yall. Here goes. On our way to O'Fallon IL to start school for Earl L. Henderson. We are so super excited. Of course my husband has driven before for about 10 years and got out of it for a while and now I am gonna doit with him, so Im a lil more nervous than him. Any calming words of advice for this rookie gal?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Deep breaths, stay focused and listen to the people teaching you. I'll be there on the 26th, perhaps I'll catch you guys around the yard.

double-quotes-end.png

Awesome. Maybe we will see each other. You coming alone?

Yep yep, flying solo lol

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Believe it or not, the people who run into the biggest problems with their careers early on are people who come into the industry with a rigid set of expectations and strong opinions about pretty much everything. They expect to be treated a certain way, trained a certain way, and they think they have the entire process figured out in their head. Then they arrive for orientation and training, find out everything is completely different than they had imagined, and start believing that the company is disorganized or unprofessional.

So these student drivers start questioning everything. Why don't I get more time in the truck? Why do they keep changing our schedule around? Why aren't the instructors spending more time with us? Why do we spend so much time waiting on things? Why aren't they sending me out on the road sooner?

Before long they start getting an attitude and begin confronting the staff and drumming up discontent amongst the other students. Their attitude continues to sour, they get more confrontational with the staff, and before long they're on a bus headed home. Naturally they blame the company for their demise and begin hitting every website they can find to badmouth the company.

The best thing you can do is go in with a great attitude and an open mind. Whatever you expect, toss it aside and deal with whatever is in front of you instead. Just roll with it. Do what you're asked to do and do it with a smile. Someday you'll understand why things are done the way they are in this industry but in the beginning it's going to seem baffling. Don't sweat it. Just keep listening, learning, working hard, and do it all with a great attitude.

Here is some reading for you:

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Team Staples's Comment
member avatar

Believe it or not, the people who run into the biggest problems with their careers early on are people who come into the industry with a rigid set of expectations and strong opinions about pretty much everything. They expect to be treated a certain way, trained a certain way, and they think they have the entire process figured out in their head. Then they arrive for orientation and training, find out everything is completely different than they had imagined, and start believing that the company is disorganized or unprofessional.

So these student drivers start questioning everything. Why don't I get more time in the truck? Why do they keep changing our schedule around? Why aren't the instructors spending more time with us? Why do we spend so much time waiting on things? Why aren't they sending me out on the road sooner?

Before long they start getting an attitude and begin confronting the staff and drumming up discontent amongst the other students. Their attitude continues to sour, they get more confrontational with the staff, and before long they're on a bus headed home. Naturally they blame the company for their demise and begin hitting every website they can find to badmouth the company.

The best thing you can do is go in with a great attitude and an open mind. Whatever you expect, toss it aside and deal with whatever is in front of you instead. Just roll with it. Do what you're asked to do and do it with a smile. Someday you'll understand why things are done the way they are in this industry but in the beginning it's going to seem baffling. Don't sweat it. Just keep listening, learning, working hard, and do it all with a great attitude.

Here is some reading for you:

Thanks for the words of advice guys. I really dont know what to expect. All I can do is walk in there as humble as I can and absorb what Im being taught.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Make your time on the truck count. Lots of students, but you'll get your turn. Be patient. Henderson is very patient with the students. It's a good school and great company

Team Staples's Comment
member avatar

Well I am here. Checked into the hotel this morning at aroynd 2 am. I start tomorrow. Here goes nothing. Or everything rather. Im nervous as ****. Prpbably wont sleep well tonight. Talked to some of the other guys in classes before me. Not real positive about how this all works. Some guys seem to have alot more info that i didnt even concider. I guess all I can do is go in with an open mind and hope that my husband with all his prior expirence will be able to guide me a lil.

Anchorman's Comment
member avatar
Some guys seem to have alot more info that i didnt even concider.

What info did they have that you did not consider?

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