Any Homeless Truckers Out There?

Topic 11178 | Page 1

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Need's Comment
member avatar

Odd question I know. I am wondering if anyone does not keep a house or apartment and just keeps traveling.

I will be moving out of my house in a few months and do not have a wife or kids.

To me it would be ideal to just stay on the road. If I had a week waiting for a load or something I would just enjoy the adventure of where I was at (if it was an adventurous place -haha) Or vise versa - if i needed to just keep working for weeks I could do that.

Taking a few days off I could stay in a hotel even upgrading it since I save money with no mortgage.

In my situation I could work for a few years and just save. I have no debt.

Might help the company since I would not really care where I was based out of…or not even having a base. To me it is time to work hard and save for retirement in 20 yrs.

Oddly it sounds perfect to/for me. I am not the type to get lonely (in fact prefer it), I do not mind small places like the sleeper (looks perfect to me). No family to visit at least not for more than a few days a couple times a year.

Store my F350 truck (4 wheeler) and my stuff in my cargo trailer, park it at my relatives farm so no worries about my stuff.

Roll for 10-15 years OTR....or whatever and just save my money

Anyways just a dream I have always had and soon will be free to pursue it.

Of course I would spend a couple of years (my early learning) making sure that is how I want to work.

I do not heard of many guys doing this so I thought I would ask in case I am missing something.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Chris Jones ( MonkeyBone's Comment
member avatar

Odd question I know. I am wondering if anyone does not keep a house or apartment and just keeps traveling.

I will be moving out of my house in a few months and do not have a wife or kids.

To me it would be ideal to just stay on the road. If I had a week waiting for a load or something I would just enjoy the adventure of where I was at (if it was an adventurous place -haha) Or vise versa - if i needed to just keep working for weeks I could do that.

Taking a few days off I could stay in a hotel even upgrading it since I save money with no mortgage.

In my situation I could work for a few years and just save. I have no debt.

Might help the company since I would not really care where I was based out of…or not even having a base. To me it is time to work hard and save for retirement in 20 yrs.

Oddly it sounds perfect to/for me. I am not the type to get lonely (in fact prefer it), I do not mind small places like the sleeper (looks perfect to me). No family to visit at least not for more than a few days a couple times a year.

Store my F350 truck (4 wheeler) and my stuff in my cargo trailer, park it at my relatives farm so no worries about my stuff.

Roll for 10-15 years OTR....or whatever and just save my money

Anyways just a dream I have always had and soon will be free to pursue it.

Of course I would spend a couple of years (my early learning) making sure that is how I want to work.

I do not heard of many guys doing this so I thought I would ask in case I am missing something.

Sounds like a pretty solid plan, if you can handle the small spaces which you said you could. Go for it man, enjoy the adventure.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That's what I did most of my career. I've never been married and don't have any kids so I just travelled for a lot of years. I didn't have a home, nor did I have a vehicle most of the time. I just lived in the truck and spent time off visiting family and friends. It's an excellent way to live and a great way to save up some money.

's Comment
member avatar

I could have written this post when I first started. The only advice I would give you is not to fool yourself into thinking you can just roll, roll, roll. You will burn out quick. Plan on taking a few days off every 6-8 weeks just to keep you sane. Plan ahead. If you find yourself in a place you want to explore, make a note and talk to your DM about another load there with time off. You will rarely find yourself in a position to take time off spur of the moment. If you do have spare time, trust me on this, you will want to use it sleeping. Pm me if you like. I am happy to answer any questions.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Need's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys and thanks for the positive feedback.

Good points all. I even think the selling my 4 wheeler is a good plan.....after I work for a while and be sure this plan will work for me.

Small places - my profile picture is of me driving my Unimog (German Army radio truck). I traveled in it from coast to coast from Mexico to Canada in a 5 year journey. Living in the back was really small. I loved it. The downside to it was having to work on the engine almost daily and getting stuck when the engine blew deep in the desert - Took 2 months to take the engine apart and fix it.....with no one in sight for those months. Living off of MREs and rationing water.

vwidiot - Good to hear that from a fellow Colorado guy. I am originally from Breck. I do have a list of questions I have amassed over the last year. Most of the time I just try to figure them all out via forums, youtube, etc. But there are a few I have not figured out yet. Might be best to ask in open forum for others. However would really like to hear your story and what's going on now. Feel free to pm me.

I bought the book for sale on this site - Great positive book. I really like to hear guys say it is fun too. I understand it is hard hard work. But wow what an adventure it must be too.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

Odd question I know. I am wondering if anyone does not keep a house or apartment and just keeps traveling.

I will be moving out of my house in a few months and do not have a wife or kids.

To me it would be ideal to just stay on the road. If I had a week waiting for a load or something I would just enjoy the adventure of where I was at (if it was an adventurous place -haha) Or vise versa - if i needed to just keep working for weeks I could do that.

Taking a few days off I could stay in a hotel even upgrading it since I save money with no mortgage.

In my situation I could work for a few years and just save. I have no debt.

Might help the company since I would not really care where I was based out of…or not even having a base. To me it is time to work hard and save for retirement in 20 yrs.

Oddly it sounds perfect to/for me. I am not the type to get lonely (in fact prefer it), I do not mind small places like the sleeper (looks perfect to me). No family to visit at least not for more than a few days a couple times a year.

Store my F350 truck (4 wheeler) and my stuff in my cargo trailer, park it at my relatives farm so no worries about my stuff.

Roll for 10-15 years OTR....or whatever and just save my money

Anyways just a dream I have always had and soon will be free to pursue it.

Of course I would spend a couple of years (my early learning) making sure that is how I want to work.

I do not heard of many guys doing this so I thought I would ask in case I am missing something.

My plan!!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Craig T.'s Comment
member avatar

I've updated my LinkedIn account and online dating profiles with the title "Tax Paying Pseudo Hobo"

Before trucking I got rid of a lot of things. Such as TV, fast food, a bed, and basically my whole apartment. Cleansed my life of burdens really. That was so I could live out of a backpack for 9 months travel trekking. Gained all kinds of friends from all over the world and a new perspective on life.

Do that kind of lifestyle and trucking is easy. I've come to work in the most sight changing office window I could think of. So money is just building up in the bank since I'm not blowing it away on nonsense. Will actually take a long leave of absence when I hit my 1 year mark for another big adventure. Which I guess could be constituted as nonsense but it's every worth every penny to me.

My personal tip; don't do hotels or allow yourself to hole up in isolation when you're not trucking. Always go for the hostels. You're far more likely to meet interesting people. If you're in a big city, you're more than likely to meet traveling foreigners that are fun to hit the town with. It's also cheaper.

My thing is to look for state parks I can truck in and go hiking/camp the night. I also love to rock climb so I hit as many rock climbing gyms as I can all over the country. I've got a skateboard and bike to get away from the truck instead of calling a taxi. Yoga classes, places with saunas, steam rooms, float tanks, and museums are what I opt for instead of a movie theater (you'll be sitting enough).

Don't get me wrong, trucking is hard, long, tedious work. So take time to play and enjoy yourself. I find myself smiling almost everyday when I start the engine and hit the highway. Simple things like a good song, audiobook, or podcast get me stoked to have nothing to do but drive for 10 hours. Remember to sleep, get exercise everyday, eat well, drink a lot of water, and you can have a good future ahead of ya. Keep in touch with people and go out of your way to make hanging out with them possible. I mean, I'll park my truck in Pennsylvania and take the train to NYC to visit friends. Or they'll come scoop me out of a truck stop and next thing I know, I'm driving a 4 wheeler around San Francisco.

Make it happen, captain. Mentality is everything.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Need's Comment
member avatar

AWESOME reply!!

Got what your saying. After living most of my life in Breckenridge Colorado with 80 days a season on the hill, multiple bike tours around Europe and western US, several treks in a disused 4x4 military vehicle around the US on fun adventure tours and hiking the Appalachian trail solo in the winter - you are just the type of person and response I was looking to hear from.

I only stopped adventures 11 years ago when the love of my life said she needed me to settle down (we actually have been together 17 years but only settled down 11 years ago). Unfortunately I will be losing her soon. Cancer be not proud. We had planned on getting a truck camper and touring the country next. But my partner and resources are all used up on medical. Nuff said about that.

The idea of getting paid to tour around (even though it is like you say "hard, long, tedious work") it is what I need. Get out, get a fresh start and stay busy!

Your tips are just right and exactly what I hope to do. Be proud you helped someone and someones heart tonight.

Best of luck to you and thanks to all of you truckers for the hard work you do!

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
Unfortunately I will be losing her soon. Cancer be not proud.

I survived but the C took my wife in 2000. Keep on keeping on.

-- Errol

Mark's Comment
member avatar

I've been wondering about this topic too. One question not addressed already is how do you maintain an address if you're truly "homeless?" You have to have an address for a bank account, filing income taxes, credit card, voting, cell phone etc.

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