Scale Tickets

Topic 11311 | Page 1

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Chris Jones ( MonkeyBone's Comment
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Being a company driver, how do the scale tickets get paid. Driver responsibility or company reimbursement

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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If you're talking about CAT scales to check your load, most of the larger companies will pay for the initial weigh and you for the bill for a re weigh. Sometimes you just put it on your fuel card, sometimes it's seems the receipt with your paperwork and get reimbursed.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Cat Scales:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Kieran L.'s Comment
member avatar

I am thinking he might also mean when you get an overweight ticket at a weigh station, who pays the ticket? I don't know for certain but I would guess you are ultimately responsible for paying it since the ticket is written to you, not the company, and it will go on your driving record, but the company might reimburse you in some instances, if it wasn't your fault.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Indeed both guys are correct. When you're scaling the load at a truck stop to check your weight the company will reimburse you. If you get a ticket from the DOT for being overweight you will pay that yourself. It's the driver's responsibility to make sure the truck is safe and legal to drive and being the proper weight is part of that.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

Actually they will write the ticket,to the truck owner. Your company will pay the ticket,and charge you back. Refuse to pay ticket,and your fuel card will be turned off,and you wont be moving any freight. A load shifted on me,I was 5K over on tandems.,ticket cost $1150,Company made me sign an agreement for $50 weekly,until paid. Ticket was not my fault,partner was a poor driver,load was 3000 mile trip,and we scaled a dozen times,during the journey. I just started driving my shift,when I was issued the ticket.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Nick's Comment
member avatar

Actually they will write the ticket,to the truck owner. Your company will pay the ticket,and charge you back. Refuse to pay ticket,and your fuel card will be turned off,and you wont be moving any freight. A load shifted on me,I was 5K over on tandems.,ticket cost $1150,Company made me sign an agreement for $50 weekly,until paid. Ticket was not my fault,partner was a poor driver,load was 3000 mile trip,and we scaled a dozen times,during the journey. I just started driving my shift,when I was issued the ticket.

Huh... Never scaled my loads more than once. Dozens of times..... That adds up at 10$ a pop, sometimes more. I always have load locks never had a load shift on me that I'm aware of. Something else I guess I need to start checking 😐

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Actually they will write the ticket,to the truck owner. Your company will pay the ticket,and charge you back. Refuse to pay ticket,and your fuel card will be turned off,and you wont be moving any freight. A load shifted on me,I was 5K over on tandems.,ticket cost $1150,Company made me sign an agreement for $50 weekly,until paid. Ticket was not my fault,partner was a poor driver,load was 3000 mile trip,and we scaled a dozen times,during the journey. I just started driving my shift,when I was issued the ticket.

double-quotes-end.png

Huh... Never scaled my loads more than once. Dozens of times..... That adds up at 10$ a pop, sometimes more. I always have load locks never had a load shift on me that I'm aware of. Something else I guess I need to start checking 😐

Totally agree - never scaled a load more than once and loads rarely shift like that.

In fact, you said you were over on your tandems by 5,000 pounds? You would have to shift an entire 45,000 pound load about 8 feet to move 5,000 pounds to your rear tandems from where it was initially with a balanced setup. Now you could have had one of those gigantic paper rolls slide all the way to the back doors of a 53 foot trailer and that might do it, but how would rolls that big and heavy slide that far to the rear and what would have stopped it from blasting out the back doors?

Kind of a head scratcher that one.......

Why were you guys scaling it so often? Were you scaling every time you added fuel? And what did the co-driver do to make the load shift that much?

confused.gif

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

It was a preloaded trailer,sealed when we picked it up. Load was heavy,and we traveled 3000 miles with the load. Lots of weight stations weighed us during the trip. Im the smoothest driver out there,no hurry driving,backing etc. The partner I got stuck with was a real D bag,he had bad vision,liked to tailgate,braked late and hard,driving through mountains,he took turns too fast. I had trouble sleeping while he drove,after the ticket,I threw him off the truck.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

We scaled the load once,before leaving california.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It was a preloaded trailer,sealed when we picked it up. Load was heavy,and we traveled 3000 miles with the load. Lots of weight stations weighed us during the trip. Im the smoothest driver out there,no hurry driving,backing etc. The partner I got stuck with was a real D bag,he had bad vision,liked to tailgate,braked late and hard,driving through mountains,he took turns too fast. I had trouble sleeping while he drove,after the ticket,I threw him off the truck.

Once he took over, sounds like your student slid the tandems into the one-hole after passing through the weigh stations (without your knowledge). That might explain the rough ride when you were trying to sleep, the additional weight (39,000lbs, good grief) on the tandems caused the truck to be way out of balance, causing it to handle poorly and was likely lifting the tractor when going over road bumps. Unfortunate you didn't rid yourself of him sooner.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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