R&D Transfer

Topic 11341 | Page 1

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Mike C.'s Comment
member avatar

Someone mentioned r&l..I worked there for a short time..Best advice I could give is stay away from these rotten *******s. They told me I would do line haul and p&d during the daylight hour shift so to speak..The day before I started the terminal manager called me and said your going to b a combo driver..in other words you would start at 7PM and work the dock for 7 hrs or more then take a line haul to a switch guy on an exit half way point then return..Needless to say you more of a dock worker than a driver. I would have never have accepted this job if I would have known this would have been the case. I've been a driver for 20 plus years..not a fork lift driver for 20plus yrs. .Needless to say I was as green as the grass is on the dock..Hears the problem..there main head quarters wanted the drivers to work the dock that way they get 2 for 1 at an entry level pay scale. However the localized terminal managers and especially the dock foremans hated this idea and took out there frustrations on the combo drivers..I mean from day one they had me sign a write up slip for not moving as much freight as a seasoned dock worker..that's how rotten this company is..I had 5 write up slips I had to sign out of 7 days brand new on the job..On the 8th day after punching the time clock to go in and start the the day on the dock that foreman walks up to me with another write up slip. I lost my cool... I told him take that Mother %#@ing slip and shove it up your %#@Sss..ripped it up threw it in his face walked out and never looked back. 2ppl held me grabbed my arms ..thought I was gonna kill the guy

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

It's really sad how every time we get a new person in our forum who claims to be a twenty year veteran, they have to come in here bragging about how they "took care of business" at some sorry trucking operation. I don't think I'll ever understand this phenomenom. Truckers, I love em, I just don't understand em.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

I was waiting to hear about how he liked trucking after transferring from the Research & Development field ....

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Izzat so?

I've never worked at a LTL company, but I believe you work the dock as well as drive. And as a new employee I believe you would probably spend more time on the dock then you do drive.

And then, you don't get the message that you need to work faster on the dock?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Mike C.'s Comment
member avatar

Izzat so?

I've never worked at a LTL company, but I believe you work the dock as well as drive. And as a new employee I believe you would probably spend more time on the dock then you do drive.

And then, you don't get the message that you need to work faster on the dock?

No all they did is write me up..I had no training on the dock nothing..this was a new implemented system that was new to the company at the time and management wanted to show the head honchos that this wasn't going to work. .At the price of taking it out on personnel. .I just wanted to warn other drivers about how rotten it is there..from what I understand this process has not yet been eliminated at this company. .

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

R&L isn't the only LTL outfit that has drivers work the dock. Conway-Freight has drivers work the dock. There are others. Old Dominion doesn't do this, unless the terminal is so small that everybody needs to wear multiple hats.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Forcing you to move as much freight as the old hands is just ludicrous. And then combine it with being written up from day one? Yeah, I'm with you on this one.

I watch our seasoned pro's in awe and wonder if I'll ever move freight like they do.

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