Where Have All The Professional Truckers Gone?

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Jerry Escondido's Comment
member avatar

Good Day My Fellow Professional Truckers, I took my own advice and wrote this post offline so I could review it and edit it before posting it online. All of the prior posts written by me are the result of my inexperience and knuckleheadedness.(could be a new word).

The following is what I was attempting to share with anyone that cared to listen. Please remember that I am addressing Professional Truckers, not truckers, not drivers, not truck drivers. There is a difference.

1.) Things sure seemed so much more simple and innocent back in the day. For me, the 1970s. I remember Truckers as good, honest, helpful, humble people. Like the TV series, " MOVEN' ON". Where has that image of Truckers gone?

2.) Where has our national pride went. I have no problem being an outspoken patriot. While I served in the US Navy, I had the chance to visit many different countries. I love the United States of America and our way of life. We American citizens should try to remember, we may be black, white, brown, male, female, young, old, blond, or brunette, "BUT" we are all Americans.

3.) When a man or woman chooses to become a Professional Trucker, there are resposibilities that come with the job. We are the Pros and these are our roads. We must step up and be the modern day, "Knights Templar", protecting the safety of those that travel our roads. If you are not up to the challenge, go flip burgers.

4.) Truck Driver Acadameys, please don't forget to teach some of the nuts and bolts of being a Professional Trucker. Each Professional Trucker should know, at least, the basics of how and why his truck works the way it does.

5.) Last, but most important of all, "PEOPLE MATTER MORE THAN FREIGHT". I have never considered the company policy when it comes to the safety of another human being. Any company, dispatcher , or driver manager , that puts FREIGHT FIRST, would have to stand by and watch as my behind fades into the sunset for the last time.

Well, I hope I have been a little clearer on the subjects that matter so much to me. My hope is to spark discussions among Professional Truckers that will cause our brother and sister Professional Truckers to rise up to the outstanding people that we can all be. God Bless My U.S.A. and Good Day

P.S. THANK YOU, BRETT AND TRUCKINGTRUTH FOR PROVIDING THIS PLATFORM. I THANK YOU, SIR.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

The Persian Conversion gives this post one thumb up... The other thumb is up for referring to yourself in the third person.

Kieran L.'s Comment
member avatar

This post was much easier to read, thanks Jerry. I'd like to reply from my own viewpoint, but I recognize yours may be different and also admittedly I'm still a newbie to the trucking world so I don't have your experience.

1.) Things sure seemed so much more simple and innocent back in the day. For me, the 1970s. I remember Truckers as good, honest, helpful, humble people. Like the TV series, " MOVEN' ON". Where has that image of Truckers gone?

I think this still exists today, as most truckers I've met are good, honest, helpful people. The humble part depends on the person, and of course trucking tends to attract a lot of type A personalities, which aren't always the humblest of people. Some are though, and I think in general from what I hear from most people, truckers today are still mostly friendly, helpful people when you get to know them.

2.) Where has our national pride went. I have no problem being an outspoken patriot. While I served in the US Navy, I had the chance to visit many different countries. I love the United States of America and our way of life. We American citizens should try to remember, we may be black, white, brown, male, female, young, old, blond, or brunette, "BUT" we are all Americans.

I still see plenty of national pride as well, I myself love the USA as a nation, I wouldn't wish to live anywhere else. Most truck stops I've been inside have a number of patriotic items and generally an assortment of american flags, and I know a lot of truckers today are ex-military. Many of my friends are former military, I'm wondering what makes you ask where our national pride went? I still see it every day.

3.) When a man or woman chooses to become a Professional Trucker, there are resposibilities that come with the job. We are the Pros and these are our roads. We must step up and be the modern day, "Knights Templar", protecting the safety of those that travel our roads. If you are not up to the challenge, go flip burgers.

I agree protecting the safety of everyone on the road should be the top priority of every trucker out there. I was taught this from day one when I started studying for the CDL test.

4.) Truck Driver Acadameys, please don't forget to teach some of the nuts and bolts of being a Professional Trucker. Each Professional Trucker should know, at least, the basics of how and why his truck works the way it does.

I think pretty much all of the academies TRY to do this, now whether the student takes it to heart and applies it is up to them. As the old saying goes, "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink."

5.) Last, but most important of all, "PEOPLE MATTER MORE THAN FREIGHT". I have never considered the company policy when it comes to the safety of another human being. Any company, dispatcher , or driver manager , that puts FREIGHT FIRST, would have to stand by and watch as my behind fades into the sunset for the last time.

Absolutely people matter more than freight. Safety is always the top concern when driving a class A CMV. Now do understand though, that safety is also the reason for some of the rules and laws we have now that didn't used to exist in the trucking world, such as running e-logs instead of paper (Because running 16+ hours a day just because you can cheat your paper logs and get away with it is NOT a safe driving practice. Tired driving has been proven to be even more dangerous than drunk driving.), and the rules about only approved riders and no picking up hitchhikers. The approved riders only rules are all about safety, because many truckers have been robbed, trucks stolen, or lost their lives due to taking someone unknown onboard, not to mention if you get in an accident with an unapproved rider onboard you and your company could be sued for millions if they are injured or killed.

Now I would still stop and help someone if I think they need help and I can help.

Have you had any recent experiences that lead you to believe that things are worse than they used to be? Overall from what I know I think they are as good or better now than they used to be in the old outlaw trucking days, except for maybe the pay.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Good Day My Fellow Professional Truckers, I took my own advice and wrote this post offline so I could review it and edit it before posting it online. All of the prior posts written by me are the result of my inexperience and knuckleheadedness.(could be a new word).

The following is what I was attempting to share with anyone that cared to listen. Please remember that I am addressing Professional Truckers, not truckers, not drivers, not truck drivers. There is a difference.

1.) Things sure seemed so much more simple and innocent back in the day. For me, the 1970s. I remember Truckers as good, honest, helpful, humble people. Like the TV series, " MOVEN' ON". Where has that image of Truckers gone?

2.) Where has our national pride went. I have no problem being an outspoken patriot. While I served in the US Navy, I had the chance to visit many different countries. I love the United States of America and our way of life. We American citizens should try to remember, we may be black, white, brown, male, female, young, old, blond, or brunette, "BUT" we are all Americans.

3.) When a man or woman chooses to become a Professional Trucker, there are resposibilities that come with the job. We are the Pros and these are our roads. We must step up and be the modern day, "Knights Templar", protecting the safety of those that travel our roads. If you are not up to the challenge, go flip burgers.

4.) Truck Driver Acadameys, please don't forget to teach some of the nuts and bolts of being a Professional Trucker. Each Professional Trucker should know, at least, the basics of how and why his truck works the way it does.

5.) Last, but most important of all, "PEOPLE MATTER MORE THAN FREIGHT". I have never considered the company policy when it comes to the safety of another human being. Any company, dispatcher , or driver manager , that puts FREIGHT FIRST, would have to stand by and watch as my behind fades into the sunset for the last time.

Well, I hope I have been a little clearer on the subjects that matter so much to me. My hope is to spark discussions among Professional Truckers that will cause our brother and sister Professional Truckers to rise up to the outstanding people that we can all be. God Bless My U.S.A. and Good Day

P.S. THANK YOU, BRETT AND TRUCKINGTRUTH FOR PROVIDING THIS PLATFORM. I THANK YOU, SIR.

Welcome Jerry. Good post. As you invest more time in this forum you will hopefully realize that the good, honest, helpful, humble truckers that you remember, are fortunately alive and well on this website. Safe travels!

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jerry wrote:

4.) Truck Driver Acadameys, please don't forget to teach some of the nuts and bolts of being a Professional Trucker. Each Professional Trucker should know, at least, the basics of how and why his truck works the way it does.

Kieran L replied:

I think pretty much all of the academies TRY to do this, now whether the student takes it to heart and applies it is up to them. As the old saying goes, "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink."

The schools teach the "nuts and bolts" to the extent it's required to pass the CDL tests, primarily the pre-trip inspection. Nothing more.

Beyond that it becomes the responsibility of the trainer/mentor during road-training to demonstrate and teach the finer details of being a professional trucker to the trainee. This is perhaps where the process needs improvement and there is clearly inconsistencies. Good trainers usually produce good truck drivers capable of at least standing on their own two feet, able to assume the responsibility of furthering their own professional development. Bad trainers, it's a crap shoot and unfortunately there are still bad trainers teaching bad habits and dangerous practices. Good trainers/mentors, no doubt more are needed.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pastor C.'s Comment
member avatar

Beyond that it becomes the responsibility of the trainer/mentor during road-training to demonstrate and teach the finer details of being a professional trucker to the trainee. This is perhaps where the process needs improvement and there is clearly inconsistencies. Good trainers usually produce good truck drivers capable of at least standing on their own two feet, able to assume the responsibility of furthering their own professional development. Bad trainers, it's a crap shoot and unfortunately there are still bad trainers teaching bad habits and dangerous practices. Good trainers/mentors, no doubt more are needed.

Best answer. Its like college, they teach you enough to pass a test. But your real training is being trained by an individual.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Beyond that it becomes the responsibility of the trainer/mentor during road-training to demonstrate and teach the finer details of being a professional trucker to the trainee. This is perhaps where the process needs improvement and there is clearly inconsistencies. Good trainers usually produce good truck drivers capable of at least standing on their own two feet, able to assume the responsibility of furthering their own professional development. Bad trainers, it's a crap shoot and unfortunately there are still bad trainers teaching bad habits and dangerous practices. Good trainers/mentors, no doubt more are needed.

Best answer. Its like college, they teach you enough to pass a test. But your real training is being trained by an individual.

Amen Brother! You get it.

Jerry Escondido's Comment
member avatar

Well Folks, I did like many of you suggested and have been reading a lot of the posts that have been written here. Maybe I was being a little short sighted. There are a lot of people expressing hope and brotherhood in these forums. I was basing my opinion on what I was experiencing in the truck stops, on the road, and at some of the docks I've been to. I'm a happy, friendly sort of person. When I am walking the 3 miles from the back of the TA truck stop parking lot up the restaurant or convenience store, I say "Hello or Hi" to everyone I come within 5-10 feet of. I would say only about half return the greeting. Now, I am not so ugly that I scare away women and small children. It just seems to me the BIGGEST competition for the momentary attention of another human being, is the Gosh Darn Cell Phone. I have had to accept that I can not compete with the all mighty cell phone. But this is something I must save for another posting, Cell Phones, the end of humanity.

Also, It seems to me that we all used to wave at one another as we passed on the freeway in days gone by. But not so much now a days. A simple wave of the hand or tip of he hat goes a long way to reminding us that we are all on the same team, the Professional Trucker team.

I am going to stop now. I have rambled enough for the moment.

To let you all in on a little secret, I do believe we have the best job in the world. We live and work in the greatest nation on the planet. We get to drive all over this fine country, and, "WE GET PAID" to do it. What a deal. It just don't get better than this.

So say good night Alice.....

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar
I do believe we have the best job in the world. We live and work in the greatest nation on the planet. We get to drive all over this fine country, and, "WE GET PAID" to do it. What a deal. It just don't get better than this.

That, my friend, has got to be the quote of the year. Couldn't have said it better myself!

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I do believe we have the best job in the world. We live and work in the greatest nation on the planet. We get to drive all over this fine country, and, "WE GET PAID" to do it. What a deal. It just don't get better than this.

double-quotes-end.png

That, my friend, has got to be the quote of the year. Couldn't have said it better myself!

Ditto here. By the way Jerry, when driving I always acknowledge my fellow truckers. Always have, always will.

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