Truck Driver Sentenced To Community Service......

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Serah D.'s Comment
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Truck Driver In Deadly 2014 Multi-Vehicle Crash On Hwy 17 Sentenced To Probation, Community Service

He said his breaks failed. How/what do you check the brakes during a pre-trip? I don't understand this one.

Jetguy's Comment
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Singh got off easy.

Hit 10 cars, killed one. Charged with manslaughter which is one year jailtime

Sentence was 3 years probation, 400 hours community service

Jetguy's Comment
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Sarah D read through Pretrip. Do a search- Pretrip Daniel B.

Superb job done by Daniel with pictures

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/12/11/driver-big-rig-fatal-crash-highway-17-sentenced/#.Vmw_-E3-7H4.mailto

He said his breaks failed. How/what do you check the breaks during a pre-trip? I don't understand this one.

Sometimes, even with a thorough pre trip done, bad crap can happen.

Phox's Comment
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Singh got off easy.

Hit 10 cars, killed one. Charged with manslaughter which is one year jailtime

Sentence was 3 years probation, 400 hours community service

pssh 400 hours... I do more than that every year on my own accord and that's been on top of working and going to school full time. people get off so easily sometimes.

Newbie78inpa J.'s Comment
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http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/12/11/driver-big-rig-fatal-crash-highway-17-sentenced/#.Vmw_-E3-7H4.mailto

He said his breaks failed. How/what do you check the breaks during a pre-trip? I don't understand this one.

double-quotes-end.png

Sometimes, even with a thorough pre trip done, bad crap can happen.

Correct me if i'm wrong i'm not a trucker yet but if you lose air pressure for your brakes doesn't a light on the dashboard come on letting you know? And when that happens you immediately get that rig off the road the best you can by downshifting?

Yes you are right anything can happen but with these computer controlled trucks i bet lots of warning lights go off so you can prevent serious accidents.

Bud A.'s Comment
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I couldn't get the video to play on my phone, but from reading the story, I don't see anything about the brakes failing other than it's one of the allegations in the civil suit. The main story only says he lost control of his vehicle. It doesn't say why. Was he following too close? Did someone cut him off? Did his brakes fail when he had to do a hard brake? I can't tell from the story, but maybe the video has more info about that.

I can say that every plaintiff's lawyer in the world thinks that big trucks should be able to stop like a pickup at worst. The bit about the brake problem on the inspection report going uncorrected should be taken with a grain of salt. And the fact that the guy had been driving only three months doesn't necessarily mean he was unqualified, in the legal sense. For all we know, he went through some standard kind of training. On the other hand, maybe he got his permit and rented a truck to test for his CDL. Can't tell from the story.

I thought it was also interesting that the dead guy's family wanted him to not do jail time, then amended their complaint after sentencing. Notice that the companies who hired the driver's trucking company to haul their stuff are named in the suit as well. For all we know, the family wants the driver out of jail so he can testify on their side and they can get to the deep pockets in the case. They won't collect much from Mr. Singh since he's unlikely to have a lot of assets. A couple of construction companies, on the other hand, probably have better insurance policies, if they can get to them.

This doesn't mean I think the driver wasn't at fault. He admitted it. He should be in jail. But don't jump to conclusions that the brakes were the cause of the accident, or even contributed to it. I've never read a lawsuit involving a big truck that didn't include an allegation about the truck's brakes being inadequate.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Serah D.'s Comment
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Sarah D read through Pretrip. Do a search- Pretrip Daniel B.

Superb job done by Daniel with pictures

l have read it before and will do so again and again. So with a thorough pre-trip no truck should have aNY kind of breakdown, brakes included?

Newbie78inpa J.'s Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Sarah D read through Pretrip. Do a search- Pretrip Daniel B.

Superb job done by Daniel with pictures

double-quotes-end.png

l have read it before and will do so again and again. So with a thorough pre-trip no truck should have aNY kind of breakdown, brakes included?

You can inspect with a fine tooth comb 10 times over before you hit the road but things can still break while driving. But like i was saying in my previous post a warning light should come on alerting you to a problem for a lot of things controlled by the computer.

Jetguy's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Sarah D read through Pretrip. Do a search- Pretrip Daniel B.

Superb job done by Daniel with pictures

double-quotes-end.png

l have read it before and will do so again and again. So with a thorough pre-trip no truck should have aNY kind of breakdown, brakes included?

Answer- Pretrip is the answer- to find a potential problem before it happens. Many drivers do a post-trip also.

Will you ever have a problem?- That is your job as a driver- to know what to do if there is a problem. Accidents will happen. Once you go through High Road Training, memorize the pre-trip, get the 160 hours of schooling, and drive on the road with the Trainer sitting next to you, you will understand the things that can go wrong. There's alot of work. But if you really want it- you can do it.

Trucking is dangerous- it is high risk- Driving 80.000 lbs down the road with 4 wheelers beside you who seem at times to have a death wish. Anything can happen. You have to decide for yourself how bad you want this.

The large trucking companies have new and excellent equipment. They want your wheels turning. Also, they stress safety. And if you find anything wrong, you tell the company and they will fix it immediately.

You probably already found this: Daniel B. has a great post called Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! A must see! It has a section that explains in detail the air brake test.

High Road Training Program

Pre-Trip Study Guide

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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