Inexperienced 26 Yr Old Male Interested In Company Sponsored Otr Trainining

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David O.'s Comment
member avatar

I have been wanting to get into otr for several years, mostly for the income potential and sightseeing.

My driving record is something I would like some advice on. In the past 2 years I have been cited for 2 separate speeding incidents.

The first was on the interstate. I believe 88/70 plus the officer said I was "following too closely." I took this to trail and the judge "withheld adjudication." I was sentenced to pay the full fines and attend an 8 hour traffic school.

The latest was 62/45 (nighttime speed limit is different than day time.) The officer also tried to charge me with reckless/careless driving which was dropped by the county for insufficient evidence. My attorney was able to have the judge withhold adjudication but I will have to attend a 12 hour driving school.

My record is clean for 2-3 years before these incidents, but littered with speeding tickets and 2 reckless/careless before that clean stretch.

If my record is sufficiently clean to obtain a cdl , I am looking into Prime. They seem to have a reasonable training program available at little cost to the trainee.

I have read some success stories of guys going through training with Prime and they seem to be doing well.

I'm really looking into the flatbed segment. I have several reasons, including my thought that flatbed will have the least likelihood of having to unload.

If anyone would care to weigh in on my thoughts, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks, Dave.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Sonnydogg's Comment
member avatar

Speeding tickets aren't a good thing. The shortest time I've heard was none in the past 3 yrs. Most go back 5. Calling a recruiter from those companies will answer all of your questions.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David O.'s Comment
member avatar

So I did some research on my record. Apparently, my 90/70 was adjudicated guilty. The recruiter told me that I will have to wait until one year after that infraction.

Somewhat bad news, but it will give me some time to research companies and prepare for the cdl tests.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
I'm really looking into the flatbed segment. I have several reasons, including my thought that flatbed will have the least likelihood of having to unload.

Flatbedders traditionally do a LOT more work than dry van or temperature controlled. They may not have tp "unload" but they have to secure the load, and often times, tarp it. that in itself, is harder work then throwing some boxes, or a pallet around.

Also, there are other companies that may work with you, that also have company sponsored training , like Prime does. TMC, Roehl, Swift, CR England, Celadon, XPO Logistics, and some others. You can find a list of them right here, at Company-Sponsored Training . But the best bet is to read Brett's Book, and go through the High Road Training Program. There are a lot of other helpful links, as well.

Good luck in your search

Stay safe

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

David O.'s Comment
member avatar

So, I've made it to page 35 of Brett's book and done a chapter of the high road training. I would just like to say, amazing resources!

I still think I'd prefer flat bedding but I guess I'll just have to wait and see what's available that makes the most sense for me.

Thanks for your responses, I'll check back in when I'm a little closer to meeting you guys out on the road.

David's Comment
member avatar

Dave,

I'd would recommend you make a phone call to every company you are thinking of joining and find out what you need to do to get hired with the issues you have on your record. Most if not all companies, don't like seeing speed/reckless driving. Thats a red flag in their eyes.. BUT, that may not completly DQ you. Calling and talking with the recruiters will give you an idea as to how long you need to wait to get in.. Make a list, call and jot down what they say.. It'll help narrow down your search as well.. Prime is very strict when it comes to the driving record. I had 1 accident that was only 2yrs old and they sent me home..

hope it helps,

David

David O.'s Comment
member avatar

David,

The recruiter I spoke with at prime said they like to see at least a year of safe driving after a 20 over violation.

That particular incident was March of 2015. Realistically 3 months of researching and training via this site and hopefully a couple of ride alongs with a couple truck drivers I know could do a lot for my piece of mind.

I tend to jump into things a little too fast and although I may be able to find a company to hire me now, they may not be my best option overall.

I haven't seen anything so far that would make me want to avoid Prime, but quite a few things seem very attractive. Dog rider, reputable company training, relatively new equipment.

My next plan of attack is to see if there are any local heavy equipment companies who may want to hire a part time operator/ part time mechanic/ part time driver. I have always been envious of the truck drivers, but the yellow iron is a lot of fun as well.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

David O.'s Comment
member avatar

I am more interested than ever in driving otr. It's been over a year since that 20 over I previously mentioned so I'm thinking about making some phone calls Monday.

I have a dog that I would have to be able to take with me. Other than that, I don't have many other requirements.

Can anyone give me a short list of companies who pay for training? I live in Florida but am open to relocation.

Thanks guys.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

This should help with your research:

Company-Sponsored Training Programs

and then this:

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
I have a dog that I would have to be able to take with me. Other than that, I don't have many other requirements.

I understand wanting to bring your dog with you. I am a dog owner myself. My dog will be staying with my Mom while I start my Truck Driving career. It seems to me that there are so many things to learn and deal with my first year on the road, that trying to take care of my dog at the same time would be overwhelming. Just my 2 cents.good-luck.gif

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