Roehl Transport

Topic 12055 | Page 1

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Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar

First off I apologize to the members for not posting my introduction earlier so I'll tru to summarize the past 3 months.....

After interviewing thru several companies I decided to choose Roehl... 1st week (Phase 1) was mainly introduction to the company and learning their safety and operating policies. Last 4 days of the 1st week was driving the local roads and some minor skills review.

At this point we went to Phase 2 whereas we were officially hired and given our "packets" and sent on our way. Our way was the 3 students in the class were rented a car where we drove from DFW to Gary, IN... 2 days after arrival in Gary I was introduced to my trainer and with whom I would spend the next 10 days.. At this time I learns a lot of on the road training and the ins and outs of trip sheets, checking in and out at shipper and consigned as well as maneuvering in tight areas and basic on the road operations..

Phase 3 started when my trainer released me to my training fleet manager and I started driving solo... I have now been solo for 2 months now and some wrong turns and errors were made but no injuries to myself, truck or others and for this I am happy.. I'm not sure how permanent this is but I have found that Roehl thrives in the N/E and N. Midwest. I have primarily been driving between Wisconsin and Chicago in which traffic consumes a lot of time and therefore cuts the salary a bit.. I'm not today thrilled will staying on this area but do hope is changes soon...... More to follow.....

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Phillip M.'s Comment
member avatar

Glad to hear it's going well. I'm flying from DFW to Atlanta on Sunday to begin Roehl phase 1.

Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar

Going well is ok but I signed up for OTR but seem to be only performing short hops between Wisconsin and Chicago with points in between. Not exactly what I would call OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Phillip M.'s Comment
member avatar

I signed up for Texas regional out of Grand Prairie.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Nate_K's Comment
member avatar

Going well is ok but I signed up for OTR but seem to be only performing short hops between Wisconsin and Chicago with points in between. Not exactly what I would call OTR.

I assume your are flatbed since you trained out of Gary?

Is it possible you are running Wisconsin to Illinois while they groom you and make sure you can meet deadlines and soon you will be gaining longer runs?

I start orientation on Monday in Marshfield for Midwest Regional Refrigerated.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar
Whip-Stock's Comment
member avatar

Not sure about he grooming part but I have yet to be late for any load but I have been dry van since starting w/ Roehl. I started my orentation in Grand Prarie but trained for OTR in Gary bcs Grand Prarie didn't have a OTR trainer available..... Just being aware that not a lot to be made in short hops especially since they involve traveling thru Chicago most of the time....

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

This brings back some old memories. I started at Roehl 2 yrs ago through their school in Marshfield. Was very good training. I was assigned out of Ellenwood (then atlanta terminal). The new one is much nicer. I ran dry van OTR and found out very quickly you will spend your life running the NE. That's just where they have the most freight. Honestly it drove me nuts. No disrespect to the NE folks here but the traffic, tight spots, and serious lack of parking was not what I wanted to do consistently. I ran a dedicated account for awhile which was much better. I left for better oppurtunity. About 3 times a year they contact me asking if I'm ready to come back which I respectifully decline. I can say with some certanity their trucks are much better spec'd than some other companies I could name. Just my opinion. They are a good starter company.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

First off I apologize to the members for not posting my introduction earlier so I'll tru to summarize the past 3 months.....

After interviewing thru several companies I decided to choose Roehl... 1st week (Phase 1) was mainly introduction to the company and learning their safety and operating policies. Last 4 days of the 1st week was driving the local roads and some minor skills review.

At this point we went to Phase 2 whereas we were officially hired and given our "packets" and sent on our way. Our way was the 3 students in the class were rented a car where we drove from DFW to Gary, IN... 2 days after arrival in Gary I was introduced to my trainer and with whom I would spend the next 10 days.. At this time I learns a lot of on the road training and the ins and outs of trip sheets, checking in and out at shipper and consigned as well as maneuvering in tight areas and basic on the road operations..

Phase 3 started when my trainer released me to my training fleet manager and I started driving solo... I have now been solo for 2 months now and some wrong turns and errors were made but no injuries to myself, truck or others and for this I am happy.. I'm not sure how permanent this is but I have found that Roehl thrives in the N/E and N. Midwest. I have primarily been driving between Wisconsin and Chicago in which traffic consumes a lot of time and therefore cuts the salary a bit.. I'm not today thrilled will staying on this area but do hope is changes soon...... More to follow.....

Did you talk to your fleet manager? i drive for Roehl. I thrive in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Carolina', Georgia, Ohio..lol..I was in Kentucky last week. Maybe you were put in a "local" pool by mistake. Just thinking out loud. Good luck!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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