Flatbed

Topic 12198 | Page 1

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RebelliousVamp 's Comment
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I'm wondering if all flatbed loads require to do tarping? Can you have some dedicated loads that do not require any tarping? Maybe heavy equipment? Who load the equipment on your flatbed?

I was looking at some companies who hire near me, and one of them is looking for a driver for a dedicated account for some metal...(home every day, average of $63k, etc)

I wouldn't care to do flatbed. I just can't handle heavy weight labor, and tarps I would imagine require some physical strength.

TailGunner (Ken M)'s Comment
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There are loads that don't require tarping, but it depends on what company you drive for. A flatbed Co. that hauls mostly building materials and steel will have you tarping almost everything. Except maybe rebar and *some* building materials.

Jeffry T.'s Comment
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Not all flatbed loads require tarping but the vast majority do especially during the winter months. During the winter alot of loads not normally tarped require tarping due to road salts. However there are a lot of other options for example I'm a flatbed driver but I haul a covered wagon which is a flatbed trailer with hard removable sections that make up the side walls and one large tarp that covers the top. Alot of companies are starting to use Conestoga flatbeds which has walls and roof made of tarp material but it is on a rail system so you slide it to one end of the trailer. Tmc now offers a fleet that exclusively hauls the Conestoga type flatbeds.

Covered Wagon:

A flatbed with specially fitted side plates and curved ribs supporting a tarp covering, commonly referred to as a "side kit". Named for the resemblance to horse-drawn covered wagons.

James R.'s Comment
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There are loads that don't require tarping, but it depends on what company you drive for. A flatbed Co. that hauls mostly building materials and steel will have you tarping almost everything. Except maybe rebar and *some* building materials.

What he said. you'll have better look looking for companies that use conestoga's.

conestoga <span class= covered wagon loaded with large coils" title="conestoga covered wagon loaded with large coils">

Covered Wagon:

A flatbed with specially fitted side plates and curved ribs supporting a tarp covering, commonly referred to as a "side kit". Named for the resemblance to horse-drawn covered wagons.

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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I was looking at some companies who hire near me, and one of them is looking for a driver for a dedicated account for some metal...(home every day, average of $63k, etc)

Metal is almost always going to require some form of tarping, unless it's scrap metal or something.

But honestly, having read some of your other posts where you say you don't want to be too physically involved, I don't think flatbed would be the right choice for you. Van or reefer might be a better option.

Also, does the job listing mention anything about required experience? A dedicated account, home every day and a salary double that of the first year average sounds like something that would require at least a year of experience.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rick S.'s Comment
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Flatbed, aside from being the most physically challenging (tarping, chaining strapping), is also the most dangerous of industry segments (climbing up on loads to tarp/strap/etc.).

For this reason, it's also one of the highest paying segments of the industry.

Most folks that get into it - are in pretty good physical shape, and don't mind the extra work it takes. And it's also a way to stay in pretty good shape.

Wouldn't be MY cup of tea, though I have a number of friends that work skateboard, and nothing but the greatest admiration for them.

Rick

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ken M. (TailGunner)'s Comment
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Roehl also has a fleet of Curtainsides.

Phil C.'s Comment
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They will, however, all require strapping which is somewhat physical labor depending what it is.

Phil

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
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It's not that I don't want to do any physical labor.....I'm just concerned about what kind of physical strength is required to do it. I'm not physically "strong". I've been out of shape for a long time (used to be in the gym, on my mountain bike, etc) but now I run out of air after climbing a set of stairs. It's ridiculous. I'd love to not put restrictions on myself by saying "no flatbed" but I also don't want to realize I'm unable to do my job because I lack what it takes.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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Old School worked with another young lady on here who had some problems with the physical aspects of flatbed life, mainly how to properly lift tarps. I'm sure if he sees this, he will link to his helpful tips. She's now running successfully as a solo flatbed hauler :)

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