Downshifting Sucks

Topic 12385 | Page 1

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Miss Miyoshi's Comment
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That is all.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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Eye on the tach. It's a "feel thing" for how much you gotta tap the accelerator to get the rpm up. You'll get it eventually. We've all been there.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Lol, clutch+neutral, rev, clutch+gear. Also make sure your road speed is appropriate for the gear you are downshifting to. Watch your rpms as well.

For our freightliner 10 speed: 45 = 4+5 = 9th gear 35 = 3+5 = 8th 25 = 2+5 = 7th 15 = 1+5 = 6th

So says the gal who has to retake her road test this Tuesday because of .... shifting. Ironically, shifting has NEVER been too much of a problem for me with the exception of the very first time I attempted double clutching after having learned to float them 17 years ago. Guess it was just one of THOSE days.

Relax, this too shall pass and you'll catch on.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Justin L.'s Comment
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Downshifting is pretty easy. Bring your RPM's down to about 1100, bump the accelerator and float into neutral, bump accelerator again to where your RPM's are around 1400-1500 and slide it into the lower gear. This whole double clutching thing is for the birds. I know some schools and trainers make you do it but it is just not right. Not to mention there is to much for a new driver to remember.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I've always been against the whole speed in relation to gear scenario. Mainly because now you're adding in something else for a new driver to pay attention to. If you focus on the tach, it will never let you down and works whether you're driving a 9,10,13 or 18 speed. You should always be aware of what gear you're in regardless of what the speedo says and if you have to, just say it is you go through them.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I still forget the flipper when going down. Ggrrrr. U ll get it. You just got your permit right? Plenty of time to learn

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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I find it to be super easy! I just press the little down arrow on the side of the shifter, and voila!

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
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Yes, I *just* got my permit on Saturday. Started learning how to downshift on Sunday. I know HOW it's done. Just getting my feet and hands to cooperate is the catch. I can't seem to get it into gear properly and by that time I need to use the service brake to stop, and I end up stalling out the truck.

My driving instructor did say that our truck is old and that it can be "tricky" because of all the abuse it gets from students learning how to drive but that will make it easy when I get into a newer truck when I get to Prime. So, here's hoping I can learn quickly!

Kurt's Comment
member avatar

Yes, I *just* got my permit on Saturday. Started learning how to downshift on Sunday. I know HOW it's done. Just getting my feet and hands to cooperate is the catch. I can't seem to get it into gear properly and by that time I need to use the service brake to stop, and I end up stalling out the truck.

My driving instructor did say that our truck is old and that it can be "tricky" because of all the abuse it gets from students learning how to drive but that will make it easy when I get into a newer truck when I get to Prime. So, here's hoping I can learn quickly!

when I was in school I loved down shifting they wanted us to go down at least 3 three gears when it was needed. relax,clear your mind and do it. don't stress that's why its called training.

Miss Miyoshi's Comment
member avatar

Thanks! Yeah, I'm a bit of a perfectionist, but I do realize this is my first time in a truck, and my first time driving a manual transmission of any kind. The learning curve will be a little steep, but I think with time my confidence and abilities will grow.

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