How Many Miles Do Rookie Drivers Get?

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C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Quick question guys. I'm in the process of narrowing down companies I'd like to apply to after school. Their pay all vary widely between 26 and 46 cpm for grad. My question is, on average, what kind of mileage can an untested rookie expect year 1? I know it depends on several factors but I'm trying to figure a rough take home amount if I choose a certain company. For example, Trans am advertises 40k year one. They pay about 30 cpm, so I would need at least 2500 miles a week to hit that. Is that doable? Any input welcome here.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

From what I have seen at prime...and this is just from people I know who went through the class with me of those who upgraded. ..

Our training pay after we get CDL is $700 per week guaranteed regardless of the miles. After 30k miles you can upgrade. I asked to stay with my trainer a bit longer cause of the winter driving.

Two people from my class got 1500 to 2000 hours per week for the first few weeks and now do 2500 to 3000 miles per week. One has the .36 cpm larger truck so he can bring his wife... the other has the .44 cpm lightweight.

A couple of my friends decided to team... either with their trainer or with a friend. You can make more money with teaming.... and that is discussed in another thead. However many new drivers are going lease right out of school. A few of them are having problems... not enough understanding of the business world and a few took teammates but their milage was low the first couple weeks so the codrivers would have been better driving company than team.

Really pay attention to pay scales cause as you said.... they can pay low. One person here said they were getting .21 cpm and at prime in a lightweight it's double. Depends on what is important to you... Pay...hometime...location...equipment...facilities

Quick question guys. I'm in the process of narrowing down companies I'd like to apply to after school. Their pay all vary widely between 26 and 46 cpm for grad. My question is, on average, what kind of mileage can an untested rookie expect year 1? I know it depends on several factors but I'm trying to figure a rough take home amount if I choose a certain company. For example, Trans am advertises 40k year one. They pay about 30 cpm, so I would need at least 2500 miles a week to hit that. Is that doable? Any input welcome here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I've considered prime of course. How's all that contract stuff work if I already have my cdl? 2500 to 3000 would be easy on the wallet but maybe not the old lady.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I don't know where you're from, but the company I'm going to guarantees a minimum of $ 900 / week for those home every weekend and $1100/week for those going home every other weekend. In other words, if you don't gross at least that they'll make up the difference but you can make more. They've recently changed this guarantee to the term of your employment with them.. it was just the first 3 months solo.

My personal offer was 47 cpm for short haul (their niche) and 36 cpm for longer runs to start.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

What company is that and where?

I don't know where you're from, but the company I'm going to guarantees a minimum of $ 900 / week for those home every weekend and $1100/week for those going home every other weekend. In other words, if you don't gross at least that they'll make up the difference but you can make more. They've recently changed this guarantee to the term of your employment with them.. it was just the first 3 months solo.

My personal offer was 47 cpm for short haul (their niche) and 36 cpm for longer runs to start.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

West Side Transport out of Cedar Rapid, IA. A fellow classmate of mine went up there week before last and loves it. I'll be doing Midwest Regional myself. They offer Mid West regional, North East regional and OTR (home e/o wk). Regional gets home every weekend.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I'm in Georgia, don't know much about them. U get 47cpm as a rookie?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Yep. That's what they offered me, in writing, so I'm taking it to the bank. WST is a small (~550 trucks) carrier which specializes in short haul regional. Their average length of haul is 350 miles and they operate primarily in the midwest, with the occasional run to Nashville, Atlanta, or SC. I'm on the extreme southeast end of their hiring area near Ft. Knox, KY. 47 CPM for short runs, 36 CPM for longer runs, for an avg. start pay of 42 cpm. Safety, mileage and fuel bonus paid monthly in addition to stop, layover, and break down pay. Bonuses typically average between $200-800 per month overall.

While I was in school I did see 3 WST trucks heading north on i65 every Friday afternoon :-) Very nice equipment.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Yep. That's what they offered me, in writing, so I'm taking it to the bank. WST is a small (~550 trucks) carrier which specializes in short haul regional. Their average length of haul is 350 miles and they operate primarily in the midwest, with the occasional run to Nashville, Atlanta, or SC. I'm on the extreme southeast end of their hiring area near Ft. Knox, KY. 47 CPM for short runs, 36 CPM for longer runs, for an avg. start pay of 42 cpm. Safety, mileage and fuel bonus paid monthly in addition to stop, layover, and break down pay. Bonuses typically average between $200-800 per month overall.

While I was in school I did see 3 WST trucks heading north on i65 every Friday afternoon :-) Very nice equipment.

They have a terminal in Indy as well, or at least some sort of yard where they park trucks and trailers. It's right next door to where I leave my trailer on the weekends I'm home.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Have you started driving yet? What kind of miles are available? I know every company is different.

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