Just Want To Drive

Topic 13753 | Page 1

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Christopher .'s Comment
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So, I went to crst training and after I got on the road, idk what was going on but my biggest check was 120, smallest 40 it was rough working for nothing but I finished with my trainer an then quit them, but I am having trouble getting on the road for anybody else

Tractor Man's Comment
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We need a little more info than what you stated. Expand on it if you would please

Christopher .'s Comment
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Not sure what kind of info you want. Just stating where I'm at in my career right now at home, since your getting ready for school make sure you pick the right company,I had bad experience with crst, an just want to get back on the road but so far every company that I have contacted has told me no due to contract with crst

Tractor Man's Comment
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Were you with a trainer when you were getting those small checks. What did your contract state you would be paid during training. What was the Gross amount of your paycheck. (amount before deductions). Did you have any Garnishments on your wages. (child support, back taxes, tuition reimbursement,judgements etc.) ? Did you ask your dispatcher , terminal manager, payroll dept. or HR why your checks were so small. These are a few things that anyone here will need to know to give you some answers. Yes, if you have not fulfilled your contract to CRST you will have a difficult time getting anyone to hire you. CRST will more than likely send you to collections for the amount you owe them as well.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Christopher .'s Comment
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Yes, I contacted all of them from my dispatcher to hr they told me bc of advances bug I only got one advance for 75 bucks, I was only making .26cpm which is fine to start out, the first 4 checks nothing was coming out they cut ur miles in half didn't matter what I drove I would get less truck we had was junk was always braking down, they sent us to Laredo an everything we went there except once we set for 4 days, just a bad experience with that company

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Dutch's Comment
member avatar

Christopher, your experience was pretty much the same experience I had during my first 6 months. However, instead of quitting, I stuck it out for 6 months, and established my driving record with no accidents or tickets. At that point, it was easy to get other companies to take a serious look at me, and by the 7th month I was averaging $1000 per week.

You simply gave up, and quit too soon, and now it's going to be hard to find a reputable company to take a chance on you, because you don't have an established driving record for them to consider. If you do find another company, it will most likely be one that is self insured.

Few industries allow a new recruit the ability to make so much money, in such a short period of time, but there is a price to be paid during the first 6 months to a year. If a new driver cannot deal with the negatives of first year driving, they would probably be better off just working a local job for the wages they are currently making.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Christopher .'s Comment
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I understand that I'm not going to make the big bucks off the top, but 75 a week nobody would drive for that

G-Town's Comment
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Christopher when you started training with CRST you signed a contract stipulating the terms and obligations of their training agreement. Their obligation was met, they trained you. In return you agreed to work for them for a set period of time. By quitting before you met your obligation, CRST is exercising their authority to block you from working for a competitor and likely withholding your training certificate. If you want to continue on your career path as a truck driver I suggest that you ask CRST for your job back.

Old School's Comment
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Hey Christopher, Welcome to the forum!

My first question would have to be why weren't you in here before now. It is very frustrating to us when people come in here for their first post ever and all they want to do is slander their first trucking employer. The problem with your first post is simply this: We've had a good many people in this forum make a start to their career at CRST and be very successful at it. You see, when that happens it makes it very hard for us to accept your implication that it was a bad company to start with.

Chris, I started my career at Western Express, a company that has a terrible reputation in just about any trucking forum you look at. Guess what? I did great there, and so does anyone else who sticks it out and proves themselves. It takes time and commitment to be a truck driver, the new guys don't get handled like the seasoned vets. You quit way too soon.

I finished with my trainer an then quit them

Christopher, it sounds to me like a classic case of a guy who signed a contract and didn't even have a clue about what he was signing. I don't even think you understood exactly how the training pay worked, because what you stated above sounds like the pay for after you've gotten your own truck. At CRST you gave them the authority to collect the money that you owe them from whomever hires you now. Does that sound like a good way for you to go out and find a job now? That is the reason no one will hire you. Don't blame CRST after you signed their contract that binds you to them until you have paid them what you owe them! Do you think CRST should just absorb the costs of training yo and then let you quit and go find a different job?

I'm being realistic with you here and if you'll heed what I'm telling you then you can move on with your career. You have two options at this point.

Option 1) Write a check to CRST for what the contract states you owe them. This will free you up to go elsewhere.

Option 2) Man up and go back and finish what you started. This will allow you to gain some much needed experience while also gaining your self respect because you proved yourself able to handle the problems associated with getting started in the trucking business.

I know you probably jumped in here hoping to find a group of folks who would cheer you on and tell you how bad CRST is, and then pat you on the back for "showing the man that you're not gonna take this kind of treatment," but we understand how tough it is to get started in this, and we will always try to advise you the best way to go about getting it done.

Nobody makes good money at this during training, and very few will even do real well during their first year. It's called "learning the ropes." It is tough out here making a decent start at this stuff, but it is also very rewarding for the folks who manage the hardships and face the challenges of the career and come out on top in the end. You say you "just want to drive." Well, I say, "Go put yourself back in the drivers seat at CRST and do just that, you'll be glad one day that you did."

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I of course agree wholeheartedly with Old School. The commitment is only a matter of months and you're just now getting to the part where you're done with training and ready to get out there and do your job. And then you quit.

You're going to have a heck of a time finding work elsewhere. Go back to CRST and finish what you started. Show em you're an awesome driver who they can count on to be safe, hard working, and reliable and you'll get the miles you need for some solid paychecks. But you have to prove yourself first. You were in training and yet you expected a large, well-established company to prove themselves to you? I don't think so. It's the other way around. So go back there and prove to them you're worthy of being trusted to turn big miles for important customers.

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