Probably Failed DOT Drug Screen In Sept. 2015

Topic 13988 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I believe by law if you fail a drug screen the testing clinic has to contact you first before contacting the company that requested the drug screen. So I don't believe you failed the test if you weren't told you failed by the testing clinic directly.

Intellectual Ape's Comment
member avatar

According to my research, it should leave your system to the point of being undetectable within a few weeks. So if you were off it cold turkey for 2 months straight prior to the drug test, you should be fine. Just don't start up again in the meanwhile and you ought to be fine.

Personally I think this sort of thing ought to be regulated the way alcohol is regulated, both by the government and by private companies, but the "war on drugs" mixed with the "stoner culture" pretty much guarantees it will probably be a good century before that happens. And even if it were regulated the way alcohol is regulated, the way alcohol is regulated is "no drinks for CMV drivers in the truck" so practically teetotaling anyway.

Just my two cents. Carry on!

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
PvtJoker's Comment
member avatar

According to my research, it should leave your system to the point of being undetectable within a few weeks. So if you were off it cold turkey for 2 months straight prior to the drug test, you should be fine. Just don't start up again in the meanwhile and you ought to be fine.

Personally I think this sort of thing ought to be regulated the way alcohol is regulated, both by the government and by private companies, but the "war on drugs" mixed with the "stoner culture" pretty much guarantees it will probably be a good century before that happens. And even if it were regulated the way alcohol is regulated, the way alcohol is regulated is "no drinks for CMV drivers in the truck" so practically teetotaling anyway.

Just my two cents. Carry on!

Agreed. With ignorant and hard-headed politicians like Jeff Sessions - who said that only bad people smoke pot - it's going to be another generation before any regulation other than pure prohibition will be passed.

Anywho, I've ordered a free DAC report, and I'll call the trucking company as soon as I get a chance.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Regardless of what the general laws say about Marijuana it will never be legal for trucking. There is a long list of legal prescription drugs that are not permissible for commercial driving because of the effects they have on your alertness and perception. And because it stays in your system as long as it does it will never be regulated like alcohol in the trucking industry. The way it is now is the way it will likely always be. You simply can't use it if you're going to be a driver.

Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

I disagree. There are already tests in Colorado for blood and breath to determine if you are high on weed. Just like alcohol, 24 hours later you are no longer high. Its just because of the fact that it stays in your urine for much longer. Once weed is federally legal there will be federal levels and testing rules for DUI weed. So it will become just like alcohol. The modern testing will be able to determine if you are high at the time whereas all we have now is a UA that can tell if you have smoked in the last 6 weeks but not if you are high right now. It will become just like alcohol only far less dangerous.

Phil

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Terry C.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett was correct in saying the lab must contact you if you test positive. If you kept the receipt that you get when you test, it's in the fine print stating that the lab doctor will contact you for any positive (or false positive) result. False positives are given when the sample you gave was diluted, meaning you drank a ton of water before the test and your urine was low in creatine. The lab will automatically assume that if you drank enough water to dilute the specimen that you were trying to hide something. In most cases here you'll still get a call from the lab asking you if and why you drank a bunch of water before sending the result to the requesting company. The same applies to a positive result. You'll get a call from the doctor asking if you took any medications or ate something that could have caused a positive result for THC. Some medications such as tetracycline or foods with poppy seeds can give a positive result for THC.

When the lab tests for THC they aren't actually looking for THC they are looking for a metabolite that your body secrets into your system when you have THC in your system. That metabolite stores particularly high in the fat cells in your bladder which is why THC can be detected for so long in urine after you ingest it. Your body secrets this same metabolite with some medications (like the one mentioned above) or ingest foods like poppy seeds and others. Thus you'll get a call before they contact the requesting company.

Like Errol mentioned, I think you just fell through the cracks of the recruiter or there could have been something else in your background they took a dislike to. I wouldn't sweat a possible positive test result. Either way if you want to keep a career in the trucking industry you had best stay well away from the buds.

PvtJoker's Comment
member avatar

I'm not worried about anything in my background. Never been arrested; the worst I've gotten was a careless driving ticket that was dropped.

I'm just going to do a reset and start applying again as if I never applied to any carrier, except when asked.

Thanks for the info guys and gals!

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I believe by law if you fail a drug screen the testing clinic has to contact you first before contacting the company that requested the drug screen. So I don't believe you failed the test if you weren't told you failed by the testing clinic directly.

Not to sure about that.

We hear of plenty of folks pulled from orientation for failed test and sent home.

Not one of them reported being contacted by the lab.

Though this might be for patently ILLEGAL SUBSTANCES.

Usually - prescription meds, they will contact and ask for an explanation - and if you can back up legit use, they may not mark it as a fail.

Might be totally different for DOT Drug screens though. Even scrip meds that are on the "no fly list", might just trigger an instant dismissal, without a call for explanation.

Again - all may be MOOT on a DOT screen, with, while technically a "pre-employment screen", has to follow DOT rules, not just the whims of the employer.

Not going to get into the weed debate. I did a lot of it (amongst many other things) for many years. It has many legitimate uses (aside from just getting stone).

It really has no place in trucking - hence the "judgemental reaction", and lack of sympathy for folks that fail one at orientation.

I'm getting ready for some pretty serious surgery (multiple hernias), and I'd likely pop for a number of narcotics on a hair test (if I ever get off my butt and try to get on with someone - one day, one day). you can be sure I'll have my complete medical report (including all substances used in the hospital and post-discharge) onhand if I ever make it to an orientation.

Rick

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C. S.'s Comment
member avatar

Though this might be for patently ILLEGAL SUBSTANCES.

Usually - prescription meds, they will contact and ask for an explanation - and if you can back up legit use, they may not mark it as a fail.

Might be totally different for DOT Drug screens though. Even scrip meds that are on the "no fly list", might just trigger an instant dismissal, without a call for explanation.

The MRO must attempt to contact the patient in the event of a positive result and find out if there is a legitimate medical explanation. For example, marijuana might be an illegal substance, but someone could test positive for THC if they were taking legally prescribed marinol, a pill made of synthetic THC. If there is a legal medical explanation, the test results must be reported as negative. The MRO must still raise concerns with the employer if the drug in question would affect their ability to operate the truck safely or is banned by the FMCSA.

However, this gives the potential employee the chance to change their prescription if possible or go into another industry without being blacklisted on a background check. Not saying it's a particularly common situation, especially with marinol, but that's the law. More here: MRO Standards

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Though this might be for patently ILLEGAL SUBSTANCES.

Usually - prescription meds, they will contact and ask for an explanation - and if you can back up legit use, they may not mark it as a fail.

Might be totally different for DOT Drug screens though. Even scrip meds that are on the "no fly list", might just trigger an instant dismissal, without a call for explanation.

double-quotes-end.png

The MRO must attempt to contact the patient in the event of a positive result and find out if there is a legitimate medical explanation. For example, marijuana might be an illegal substance, but someone could test positive for THC if they were taking legally prescribed marinol, a pill made of synthetic THC. If there is a legal medical explanation, the test results must be reported as negative. The MRO must still raise concerns with the employer if the drug in question would affect their ability to operate the truck safely or is banned by the FMCSA.

However, this gives the potential employee the chance to change their prescription if possible or go into another industry without being blacklisted on a background check. Not saying it's a particularly common situation, especially with marinol, but that's the law. More here: MRO Standards

For better or worse - this doesn't all seem to apply to a DOT Drug Screen (which is also a pre-employment screen for a trucking company).

We have NEVER HEARD from a member here, that they were contacted by an MRO on an orientation drug screen and given the option to not disclose. They were simply bounced from orientation.

If this weren't legal - you can bet tons of people would be filing lawsuits.

Rick

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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