JB Hunt Intermodal

Topic 14110 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Jim G.'s Comment
member avatar

I am in school and have received an offer from JB Hunt driving dedicated intermodal starting at .55cpm -.58cpm. This offer is supposed to be only available to military vets (i am an Army Vet myself), and sounds good to me, but what should i look for in the offer?

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the Trucking Truth forum Jim.

A couple of things to look for; weekly mileage average and wait times.

The reason the cpm is higher than the base OTR rate is because the mileage is likely much lower than what you would typically have if OTR. I suggest inquiring on what kind of miles you will typically average per week. Without an idea of mileage, there is no way to determine if the cpm will net you a good income.

Secondly, rail yards are not immune to wait times. On the contrary, if the train is delayed with your trailer or container, you are going to sit and wait. Once the train arrives, your load may or may not be a high-priority (like UPS) so your wait is extended. Ask about average wait times in the rail yards. If you are delivering direct to the customer's dock and it's a live unload, this too will create a wait. Ask about this as well and if you are compensated for any wait time that extends beyond a reasonable time .

One last suggestion, type the word intermodal in the search bar found in the upper left corner of this webpage. Press the enter key (search key if mobile) and you will receive a result on the search linking you to archived threads or TT Wiki information on intermodal.

Good luck.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the Trucking Truth forum Jim.

A couple of things to look for; weekly mileage average and wait times.

The reason the cpm is higher than the base OTR rate is because the mileage is likely much lower than what you would typically have if OTR. I suggest inquiring on what kind of miles you will typically average per week. Without an idea of mileage, there is no way to determine if the cpm will net you a good income.

Secondly, rail yards are not immune to wait times. On the contrary, if the train is delayed with your trailer or container, you are going to sit and wait. Once the train arrives, your load may or may not be a high-priority (like UPS) so your wait is extended. Ask about average wait times in the rail yards. If you are delivering direct to the customer's dock and it's a live unload, this too will create a wait. Ask about this as well and if you are compensated for any wait time that extends beyond a reasonable time .

One last suggestion, type the word intermodal in the search bar found in the upper left corner of this webpage. Press the enter key (search key if mobile) and you will receive a result on the search linking you to archived threads or TT Wiki information on intermodal.

Good luck.

Been working JB HUNT Intermodal for a month now, and it's awesome. Yes, less Miles but not by much (1079, 2069, 2574, 2163 and 2233 this week) and we get paid for everything we do. Train delayed, we get paid, live load/unload paid, searching for empty paid, quarterly training paid, detention paid etc.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Welcome to the Trucking Truth forum Jim.

A couple of things to look for; weekly mileage average and wait times.

The reason the cpm is higher than the base OTR rate is because the mileage is likely much lower than what you would typically have if OTR. I suggest inquiring on what kind of miles you will typically average per week. Without an idea of mileage, there is no way to determine if the cpm will net you a good income.

Secondly, rail yards are not immune to wait times. On the contrary, if the train is delayed with your trailer or container, you are going to sit and wait. Once the train arrives, your load may or may not be a high-priority (like UPS) so your wait is extended. Ask about average wait times in the rail yards. If you are delivering direct to the customer's dock and it's a live unload, this too will create a wait. Ask about this as well and if you are compensated for any wait time that extends beyond a reasonable time .

One last suggestion, type the word intermodal in the search bar found in the upper left corner of this webpage. Press the enter key (search key if mobile) and you will receive a result on the search linking you to archived threads or TT Wiki information on intermodal.

Good luck.

double-quotes-end.png

Been working JB HUNT Intermodal for a month now, and it's awesome. Yes, less Miles but not by much (1079, 2069, 2574, 2163 and 2233 this week) and we get paid for everything we do. Train delayed, we get paid, live load/unload paid, searching for empty paid, quarterly training paid, detention paid etc.

Cool beans. What yards do they have you running?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

That's cool... I ran intermodal for 2 weeks and wanted to add that they are usually in cities.. Chicago philly harrisburg.

Driving downtown Chicago as a newbie was not fun but was a great learning experience. I think it is something that really helped me go solo with less issues. Meaning you will learn a lit and quickly.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

One more thing... my trainer lived in Chicago where he ran from there to IN and MO and back. He thought it would give Him more home time...by the time he got home at night or on weekends dependi ng on the loads... his family was in bed. So hometime and load times us something you might ask about

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Jim. Intermodal is kind of a specialized type of hauling where you're mostly hauling from shipyards or train yards to customers and back. More often than not they are shorter runs, you'll spend a lot of time in big cities, and you'll stay within a rather small area.

What are you looking for in a job as far as home time and types of freight? If you want to be home more often then Intermodal might be a pretty good option. If you're looking to see a lot of the country and have more of an adventurous lifestyle then there are other types of jobs that would be better suited. Whatever you're looking for it's out there. You just have to find the right job to suit your preferences.

Here is some information on the various forms of freight and the differences you'll find in pay, job duties, and lifestyle:

Types Of Trailers In Trucking

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Welcome to the Trucking Truth forum Jim.

A couple of things to look for; weekly mileage average and wait times.

The reason the cpm is higher than the base OTR rate is because the mileage is likely much lower than what you would typically have if OTR. I suggest inquiring on what kind of miles you will typically average per week. Without an idea of mileage, there is no way to determine if the cpm will net you a good income.

Secondly, rail yards are not immune to wait times. On the contrary, if the train is delayed with your trailer or container, you are going to sit and wait. Once the train arrives, your load may or may not be a high-priority (like UPS) so your wait is extended. Ask about average wait times in the rail yards. If you are delivering direct to the customer's dock and it's a live unload, this too will create a wait. Ask about this as well and if you are compensated for any wait time that extends beyond a reasonable time .

One last suggestion, type the word intermodal in the search bar found in the upper left corner of this webpage. Press the enter key (search key if mobile) and you will receive a result on the search linking you to archived threads or TT Wiki information on intermodal.

Good luck.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Been working JB HUNT Intermodal for a month now, and it's awesome. Yes, less Miles but not by much (1079, 2069, 2574, 2163 and 2233 this week) and we get paid for everything we do. Train delayed, we get paid, live load/unload paid, searching for empty paid, quarterly training paid, detention paid etc.

double-quotes-end.png

Cool beans. What yards do they have you running?

Bnsf Corwith, Cicero and Norfolk southern 47th st., 103rd st, csx and Canadian national

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More