How To Get Those Miles

Topic 14130 | Page 2

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Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

One thing to keep in mind, the miles down on the Qualcomm are for a 24 hour period, but an 11 hour period. If you start driving at midnight, get 10 hours of driving on with a half hour break in there, you can then take your 10 hour and it is still only 830 at night. Plenty of time to add a few extra miles to the day's driving.

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My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm.

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It must be governed higher than that. (don't tell your Company,lol). 60 mph for a full 11 hours would be 660 miles. Impossible. If you get paid by Qualcomm miles, then keep this to yourself. I won't tell a soul! shocked.png

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You folks are a skeptical bunch lol. I started at 0400, took a two hour break and a couple smaller ones during the day, and ended around 1845. I clocked 10:51 of drive time, so yeah that doesn't make sense actually. Weird. I don't know, my Qualcomm must be broken.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Scott M's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

One thing to keep in mind, the miles down on the Qualcomm are for a 24 hour period, but an 11 hour period. If you start driving at midnight, get 10 hours of driving on with a half hour break in there, you can then take your 10 hour and it is still only 830 at night. Plenty of time to add a few extra miles to the day's driving.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

It must be governed higher than that. (don't tell your Company,lol). 60 mph for a full 11 hours would be 660 miles. Impossible. If you get paid by Qualcomm miles, then keep this to yourself. I won't tell a soul! shocked.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You folks are a skeptical bunch lol. I started at 0400, took a two hour break and a couple smaller ones during the day, and ended around 1845. I clocked 10:51 of drive time, so yeah that doesn't make sense actually. Weird. I don't know, my Qualcomm must be broken.

Paul W- How about posting a picture? 656 miles driven governed at 60? A pic will shut us up! Also 3 breaks?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

You have an 14 hour day but only 11 hours to drive that leaves 3 hours to take breaks, do pretrip, any onduty time, ect

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

One thing to keep in mind, the miles down on the Qualcomm are for a 24 hour period, but an 11 hour period. If you start driving at midnight, get 10 hours of driving on with a half hour break in there, you can then take your 10 hour and it is still only 830 at night. Plenty of time to add a few extra miles to the day's driving.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

It must be governed higher than that. (don't tell your Company,lol). 60 mph for a full 11 hours would be 660 miles. Impossible. If you get paid by Qualcomm miles, then keep this to yourself. I won't tell a soul! shocked.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You folks are a skeptical bunch lol. I started at 0400, took a two hour break and a couple smaller ones during the day, and ended around 1845. I clocked 10:51 of drive time, so yeah that doesn't make sense actually. Weird. I don't know, my Qualcomm must be broken.

double-quotes-end.png

Paul W- How about posting a picture? 656 miles driven governed at 60? A pic will shut us up! Also 3 breaks?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

My phone camera doesn't work so here's a screenshot after I emailed them to myself. 2016-04-29_21.05.47_zpsyeafvtql.jpg

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Paul, when it comes to the split sleeper berth you can do them back to back as long as you like. Many companies don't like people to use it simply because very few drivers understand how it works, and they end up getting themselves into a mess. I still remember how I had figured it out fairly well before I started truck driving school, and then when we did our section on logs at school the instructor never even mentioned the split sleeper provision, so I asked her a question about it and she threw up her hands and said the reason she didn't try to teach it to us is because it is too #!*@ hard to understand!

Here's a photo of two days worth of logs from my truck. They are illustrative of how you can run more than 600 miles a day even if your truck is governed at 62 (which mine is). The art of doing this kind of stuff is in how you take your breaks. If you run through the night and take your ten hour break in the middle of the day you will be able to exceed what most typical drivers do on a regular basis. Hopefully this will give some of you an idea on how to get more done. Note the total miles on the logs - one day @ 739 and another @ 668.

20160422_055526_zpsjigr6m9d.jpg

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Paul, when it comes to the split sleeper berth you can do them back to back as long as you like. Many companies don't like people to use it simply because very few drivers understand how it works, and they end up getting themselves into a mess. I still remember how I had figured it out fairly well before I started truck driving school, and then when we did our section on logs at school the instructor never even mentioned the split sleeper provision, so I asked her a question about it and she threw up her hands and said the reason she didn't try to teach it to us is because it is too #!*@ hard to understand!

Here's a photo of two days worth of logs from my truck. They are illustrative of how you can run more than 600 miles a day even if your truck is governed at 62 (which mine is). The art of doing this kind of stuff is in how you take your breaks. If you run through the night and take your ten hour break in the middle of the day you will be able to exceed what most typical drivers do on a regular basis. Hopefully this will give some of you an idea on how to get more done. Note the total miles on the logs - one day @ 739 and another @ 668.

20160422_055526_zpsjigr6m9d.jpg

That's good to know!! They actually taught me sleeper splitting incorrectly in school, so I didn't learn the right way until I watched what my Qualcomm did with my hours when I tried it.

That's smart how you take your breaks during the day. I will have to give that a try next time I'm in an area where there's traffic. We just don't get enough traffic to make a big difference over here in Wyoming where Swift likes to run me through all the time.

I don't know how you can do a whole day of driving with just a few small breaks like you did in your picture. I tried sleeper splitting so I could get that nice 2 hr extended lunch hour in the middle of my "day," since I was wasting too much time off duty during the day in addition to my 10 hr resets. I just can't sit for that long--I start going crazy lol...or falling asleep...which are both bad things. Does it just come with time?

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Paul, I run in the Northeast a lot, so during the day there is heavy traffic. It makes sense for me to run at night and take my breaks during the day - I can get a lot more done that way.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Paul, I run in the Northeast a lot, so during the day there is heavy traffic. It makes sense for me to run at night and take my breaks during the day - I can get a lot more done that way.

Well, in that case, I have a new level of respect for you. Last time I was in New Jersey, I lost an entire hour because I got turned around in heavy traffic and detours. I made one wrong turn and it all went downhill from there. I didn't know which detour to take and my Qualcomm thought u-turns were the answer. Wyoming may be boring, but at least I can plan on going at least 55 all day.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Paul, I run in the Northeast a lot, so during the day there is heavy traffic. It makes sense for me to run at night and take my breaks during the day - I can get a lot more done that way.

Man, the northeast is a different animal during the day. I still remember what it was like to drive on 95 southbound from CT through NY to get back home in PA. I was coming back from a trip up in VT - had no idea how bad it was gonna be around 6am from New Haven, CT into NY. Those last 20 or so miles to get to 287 were grueling. This was on a weekday morning during rush hour. Do the same route in the middle of the night, and you've got three wide open lanes on 95 from CT to NY.

I've been to Brooklyn, NY in the middle of the afternoon before too - not ... very ... good.

And this is why I prefer to run out west ...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

To add to the discussion in regard to miles possible ... We have a run that is 642 miles. It can be done with a truck governed at 67 mph, with lots of hills to pull, and still have about 45 minutes remaining on your 11 hour clock upon return from the trip. The same run can be done without a turned up truck, governed at 63 mph. And again, there a lot of hills to pull going from PA to upstate NY.

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