How To Get Those Miles

Topic 14130 | Page 1

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Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been doing a regional dedicated account for about three months now. At first, most of my loads went 300-400 miles. That meant more drop/hook and (yuck) more live load/unloads.

I got plenty of miles, but you know swapping trailers or waiting for the forklift to get done is unpaid time.

But I managed to get those trips done early or on time. My DM said I was often ahead of my track.

Then I started getting mostly 900 mile dispatches. A few short ones, buy now my trips are multi-day.

Today talking with my DM, just on passing (this wasn't am important point for her) she said "You drive 600 in a day. I have many drivers who stop after 500." Also, she knows I never complain (well, almost never) about a load. She says I've helped her out of some sticky situations.

Did you get the message?

My mom lives in St Petersburg, FL. Donna doesn't handle Florida. I asked her if I could get a trip & do my 34 in St Pete. She made it happen!

Be nice to your Driver Manager! What goes around comes around.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jetguy's Comment
member avatar
Today talking with my DM , just on passing (this wasn't am important point for her) she said "You drive 600 in a day. I have many drivers who stop after 500."

Neat! The run to Florida- Love how you worked this out. You've got good tips, and some things instigate questions... Anyway you drive 600/day- What speed do you average? What is your truck governed at? Also, I would think with the longer runs your pay would increase? If it has, do you care to share how much?

BTW- I miss your graphics on- How do I set up to back? I know I don't have your trademarked thread heading correct.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I get 38 CPM , all dispatched miles loaded or empty.

Swift trucks are gov'd at 62. Just minimize your breaks.

80% of my driving is between GP locations. So I'm familiar with which truck stops will have space when I need to stop. (Hint: I don't do many breaks at national brand places, i.e. Pilot, T/A, etc.)

What are you talking about here?

I miss your graphics on- How do I set up to back? I know I don't have your trademarked thread heading correct.

"Backing Practice"?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar
"Backing Practice"?

Yes

80% of my driving is between GP locations.

What is GP?

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for making this thread Errol! I notice you guys always start these sorts of threads with, "I was talking to my dispatcher..." How much do you talk to your dispatcher via Qualcomm , phone, or in person? I rarely call my dispatcher since we get messages fairly often saying to message instead of call, but I get the impression you and the other moderators talk to your dispatchers pretty often.

My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm. smile.gif

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

True, lots of messages go on the QC. But yesterday I lost three hours with waiting for a live unload which put me behind today and really messed up my pre plan (scheduled loads). You can figure sometimes a call is better than messages.

BTW, Donna called me! I do try to avoid calling.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm.

It must be governed higher than that. (don't tell your Company,lol). 60 mph for a full 11 hours would be 660 miles. Impossible. If you get paid by Qualcomm miles, then keep this to yourself. I won't tell a soul! shocked.png

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

True, lots of messages go on the QC. But yesterday I lost three hours with waiting for a live unload which put me behind today and really messed up my pre plan (scheduled loads). You can figure sometimes a call is better than messages.

BTW, Donna called me! I do try to avoid calling.

Lol I wasn't criticizing, just curious. I've wondered if I should call me dispatcher a little more often just to build more of a relationship, so that's why I asked.

I have to do those lousy live loads all the time, but I always use the split sleeper. Is there a limit on how much we can use that? I was told in cdl school we're not allowed to use them back to back, or "piggyback" them, so to speak. I'm hoping this isn't true because it's what I did this entire week.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm.

double-quotes-end.png

It must be governed higher than that. (don't tell your Company,lol). 60 mph for a full 11 hours would be 660 miles. Impossible. If you get paid by Qualcomm miles, then keep this to yourself. I won't tell a soul! shocked.png

Speedometer clocks me at 62, but Qualcomm clocks me at 60-61. I even used an app on my phone once and it clocked me the same as the Qualcomm. It's not impossible in the Midwest with no traffic on I-80.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

One thing to keep in mind, the miles down on the Qualcomm are for a 24 hour period, but an 11 hour period. If you start driving at midnight, get 10 hours of driving on with a half hour break in there, you can then take your 10 hour and it is still only 830 at night. Plenty of time to add a few extra miles to the day's driving.

double-quotes-start.png

My truck is actually governed at 60 not 62 and I drove 656 miles today according to my Qualcomm.

double-quotes-end.png

It must be governed higher than that. (don't tell your Company,lol). 60 mph for a full 11 hours would be 660 miles. Impossible. If you get paid by Qualcomm miles, then keep this to yourself. I won't tell a soul! shocked.png

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
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