This State Will Fine Truck Drivers Up To $2,000 For Using This Road

Topic 14623 | Page 1

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Serah D.'s Comment
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A new law aims to punish truck drivers who get stuck in Vermont’s infamous Smuggler’s Notch.

What’s the punishment? A hefty fine.

Smuggler’s Notch is a narrow passage through the Green Mountains in Stowe, Vermont. Transportation officials reported that many trucks get stuck in this pass each year, causing traffic to shut for hours at a time.

According to an article on VTDigger, many of the truckers who get stuck in the Notch don’t lack proper driving skills, but rather, common sense.

Ernie Patnoe, the Vermont Agency of Transportation maintenance manager for the region reported that on each side of the Notch there are four signs that notify truckers, “You can’t make it.”

Signs along Vermont 108 prohibit truck drivers from continuing into Smugglers Notch. There is also a six feet high, ten feet long message board that flashes the message with LEDs.

Despite the sings that warn truckers to stay away, many choose to ignore them because they rely too heavily on their GPS.

Until now, police have only issued fines of $162. With the new law in place, law enforcement can fine truck drivers $1,000 just for using the road, and up to $2,000 if their truck blocks traffic.

Lawmakers believe that the fine will cause truck drivers to make better choices, reducing the number of stuck trucks.

The law will go into effect July 1 unless Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin chooses to veto it.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Fine will work if they flash $2000 fine for usi nb this road" hahha

Guzinta's Comment
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This road is right in my back yard. Anyone who attempts this road is clearly not paying attention. GPS will always get you into trouble if you don't cross reference with a RM atlas. There are "no trucks" signs all over the place on the Notch Road. Check out the news clip below and how this driver destroyed is trailer.

Smuggler's Notch News Clip

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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OK this is hilarious. At about 1:40 in the video of the article you linked to, the reporter is standing by the rock that most drivers get stuck on. In the background you can clearly see a "truck downgrade" sign. On the road prohibited to trucks. What the heck???

rofl-3.gif

This road is right in my back yard. Anyone who attempts this road is clearly not paying attention. GPS will always get you into trouble if you don't cross reference with a RM atlas. There are "no trucks" signs all over the place on the Notch Road. Check out the news clip below and how this driver destroyed is trailer.

Smuggler's Notch News Clip

Pat M.'s Comment
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That is the standard sign for steep grades. Nothing weird about it being there. Sometimes 4 wheelers even read them too.

Guzinta's Comment
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OK this is hilarious. At about 1:40 in the video of the article you linked to, the reporter is standing by the rock that most drivers get stuck on. In the background you can clearly see a "truck downgrade" sign. On the road prohibited to trucks. What the heck???

rofl-3.gif

double-quotes-start.png

This road is right in my back yard. Anyone who attempts this road is clearly not paying attention. GPS will always get you into trouble if you don't cross reference with a RM atlas. There are "no trucks" signs all over the place on the Notch Road. Check out the news clip below and how this driver destroyed is trailer.

Smuggler's Notch News Clip

double-quotes-end.png

I saw that too. It is standard signage for "steep downgrade".

The more interesting part to me is the footage of the road and the semi hung up on the boulder. This just doesn't compute in my mind. You'd have to be just creeping and to not see your tandems about to get sheered??? wtf-2.gif

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Pianoman's Comment
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The main problem is trucker's not planning their route appropriately, but it would still help to have a sign before you get on the route. Has anyone been on this road who would know if there's a way to turn around once you get to the signs?

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

And, for the record, I think it would be a good law. It's drivers like the one in the video that give the whole industry a bad reputation--people who are too dumb to read signs and pay attention to where they're going and where their tandems are. A hefty $2000 fine might be enough to deter some truck drivers and teach a good lesson to the few who will indubitably still give it a shot.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Trucktographer's Comment
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This road is right in my back yard. Anyone who attempts this road is clearly not paying attention. GPS will always get you into trouble if you don't cross reference with a RM atlas. There are "no trucks" signs all over the place on the Notch Road. Check out the news clip below and how this driver destroyed is trailer.

Smuggler's Notch News Clip

Not true. My co-driver got dinged with a non-moving violation while on a road not listed in our Atlas as off limits. It was as bad as some of the small town speed traps that push legality.

Anchorman's Comment
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