Cooking And Refrigerators In Your Truck?

Topic 14751 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Bill P.'s Comment
member avatar

Starting my second week of CDL school. Never been in a tractor/trailer. What does everyone do for cooking or keeping items cool. Are the trucks big enough for a little refrain.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
C. S.'s Comment
member avatar

My truck has a factory installed fridge and an 1800w inverter, which allows me to run a microwave. I do most of our cooking with the microwave, crockpot, and electric kettle. For companies that don't allow inverters, you can use a 12v cooler, lunch box cooker and crockpot. Some drivers also use small propane powered hotplates (like you use when camping).

Stickers's Comment
member avatar

My truck has a factory installed fridge and an 1800w inverter, which allows me to run a microwave. I do most of our cooking with the microwave, crockpot, and electric kettle. For companies that don't allow inverters, you can use a 12v cooler, lunch box cooker and crockpot. Some drivers also use small propane powered hotplates (like you use when camping).

I too am also curious about the subject. I had no idea there were companies that did not allow inverters. Is it because they are seen as a fire hazard? How well does a 12v cooler work? Do they require ice or anything?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I too am also curious about the subject. I had no idea there were companies that did not allow inverters. Is it because they are seen as a fire hazard? How well does a 12v cooler work? Do they require ice or anything?

The 12 volt coolers work good. They basically keep the temperature about 45 degrees cooler than the temperature in your truck. They don't work as well as an actual mini fridge but they work fine, they're cheaper, and they're 12 volt so you don't need an inverter. They do not require ice, nor do they have an ice maker the way the mini refrigerators often do.

Almost all companies allow inverters. I know Swift has some sort of a policy against them but I don't know any other companies that do offhand.

C. S.'s Comment
member avatar
I had no idea there were companies that did not allow inverters. Is it because they are seen as a fire hazard?

Generally yes, companies that don't allow them have that policy because they are a fire hazard if improperly installed or used. They also tend to put a strain on the vehicle's batteries and electrical systems if they're aftermarket, potentially leading to failure of these components earlier than normal.

How well does a 12v cooler work? Do they require ice or anything?

They work fairly well, I had one when I worked for Swift and they are good at keeping things cool. They cool to around 30 degrees below ambient air temperature. You can get true 12v refrigerators, but they're pricey and don't do all that much more than a thermoelectric cooler in my opinion. They don't require ice to operate (although some drivers go that route, with a traditional cooler). Costs around $100 depending on the brand and where you buy it.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a 12v cooler. No ice needed or made in it. It may run down your truck batteries as it uses almost 5 amps. I unplug mine when I hit the sack, and plug it back in when I get going. The stuff inside does stay cool for those hours.

Also, I am on my third one in less than a year. Yes, the fan may stop, an it won't cool. Coleman has been good at sending me replacements. I plan to get new fans, and have the largest private collection of Coleman 40 qt coolers in the US!

Brett explains:

Almost all companies allow inverters. I know Swift has some sort of a policy against them but I don't know any other companies that do offhand.

Swift does not allow the larger inverters that connect directly to the battery. (Anything that plugs into the 12v system is fine.) If an Owner wants to buy a larger one, Swift will install it for him.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
member avatar

Actually been thinking about Swift, along with others. I'm probably going to need an inverter that will handle a C-PAP machine. I can't imagine them drawing too much amperage. I believe most companies are on-board with C-PAP users these days, so I'm really not anticipating any problems. I'm totally compliant, heck, I actually love using mine. They just gave me a new machine back in April and it's even better then the last one. It even has WIFI and I can access it from my phone. LOL!

JJ

Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I too am also curious about the subject. I had no idea there were companies that did not allow inverters. Is it because they are seen as a fire hazard? How well does a 12v cooler work? Do they require ice or anything?

double-quotes-end.png

The 12 volt coolers work good. They basically keep the temperature about 45 degrees cooler than the temperature in your truck. They don't work as well as an actual mini fridge but they work fine, they're cheaper, and they're 12 volt so you don't need an inverter. They do not require ice, nor do they have an ice maker the way the mini refrigerators often do.

Almost all companies allow inverters. I know Swift has some sort of a policy against them but I don't know any other companies that do offhand.

Knight did not allow them when i talked to them at MATS, just an fyi

Stickers's Comment
member avatar

I could definitely understand a company policy regarding inverters that would need to be wired to the battery. I guess I have only ever seen the ones that plug into the 12V cigarette lighter sockets and allow you to plug in your 120v stuff. I am sure they have some kind of max rated capacity you can run your truck.

Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

I could definitely understand a company policy regarding inverters that would need to be wired to the battery. I guess I have only ever seen the ones that plug into the 12V cigarette lighter sockets and allow you to plug in your 120v stuff. I am sure they have some kind of max rated capacity you can run your truck.

anything over 400 watts will blow fuses..... been there done that.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More