Considering Switching To Dry Van

Topic 14767 | Page 1

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Pianoman's Comment
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I've been doing reefer for a little over four months now, but I'm starting to have a really hard time with the sleep schedule. Most of my loads are live load/unload, so I have to deal with specific appointment times and such. I'm managing my clock well, but if I want to make a decent paycheck I log SB or off duty the whole time I'm at a customer. But in reality, I'm up every couple hours or so to deal with the office personnel or dock workers, back into a dock, etc. So I'm not getting good sleep.

I know truck drivers have no sleep schedule anyways, but is it a little better with dry van (at Swift)? More drop and hook maybe?

I've seriously gotta figure something out, cause I can't keep this up. After I get up after a few hours of sleep at a customer, I can't seem to get back to sleep but then later I'm struggling to stay awake on the road and taking extra breaks that I really don't have time for.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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It's definitely a little better with dry van. Not only do you have fewer live loads and unloads but you have fewer appointments in the middle of the night.

Swift also has a ton of dedicated accounts which might give you a better schedule also. Definitely worth looking into.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Last night is a great example:

- arrived at receiver at 19:30. Told to go park down the street and come back between 1:15 and 3:30

- came back at 1:30 and they said they don't open til 3:30. Went back to bed but couldn't sleep.

- Went back at 3:30 and found out my appt wasn't til 11:30. The lady was really nice and told me they'd call me with a dock at 6:30. Parked but couldn't sleep.

- got my door assignment at 6:00. Just finished docking and getting the paperwork taken care of inside.

- after I'm loaded (hopefully I can sleep while they're unloading me), I go 70 miles away to my next live load at 11:00, and take that load 450 miles away.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

It's definitely a little better with dry van. Not only do you have fewer live loads and unloads but you have fewer appointments in the middle of the night.

Swift also has a ton of dedicated accounts which might give you a better schedule also. Definitely worth looking into.

Thanks Brett I'll look into it then. They told me they only have Miller Coors in the Denver area and I'm no longer eligible after my fender bender. Maybe they'll consider me for something a little further from home if I offer to stay out 3-4 weeks at a time??

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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Yeah, they certainly might. That company has a million opportunities. Talk around. I very much doubt any one person knows even 10% of the opportunities that company has available.

Pianoman's Comment
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Ok I'll start by taking to my DM and see who she directs me to.

By the way, I tried reading a book before bed like you suggested--I finished it in just a few days and STILL couldn't get to sleep. I must be reading the wrong books rofl-3.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ok I'll start by taking to my DM and see who she directs me to.

By the way, I tried reading a book before bed like you suggested--I finished it in just a few days and STILL couldn't get to sleep. I must be reading the wrong books rofl-3.gif

...or you could also get into Swift's "Voice Your Choice" option, within the "In*Gauge" mobile application. Look at CO and the surrounding states (like Walmart in Utah) to see where the dedicated accounts are and request them by name, cause your DM might not know all of them. Voice Your Choice will also give you an idea of what it's like to work on a specific account. Also realize your DM although helpful, might not want you to leave their nest. Best if you set the agenda.

Living in proximity to the assigned Dedicated DC is not always a requirement, but it can make life a whole lot easier with home time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Ok I'll start by taking to my DM and see who she directs me to.

By the way, I tried reading a book before bed like you suggested--I finished it in just a few days and STILL couldn't get to sleep. I must be reading the wrong books rofl-3.gif

double-quotes-end.png

...or you could also get into Swift's "Voice Your Choice" option, within the "In*Gauge" mobile application. Look at CO and the surrounding states (like Walmart in Utah) to see where the dedicated accounts are and request them by name, cause your DM might not know all of them. Voice Your Choice will also give you an idea of what it's like to work on a specific account. Also realize your DM although helpful, might not want you to leave their nest. Best if you set the agenda.

Living in proximity to the assigned Dedicated DC is not always a requirement, but it can make life a whole lot easier with home time.

Thanks G-Town, I'll check it out.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Are you currently driving for Swift? If not and you're going to be switching companies, check out as many as possible.

I am dry van , since December, 2014, and I think I've only done a middle of the night pick up once. I usually like to start early like 4-6am. But I'm usually either hooked to the load from the day before or on my way for a drop/hook.

I don't know what your miles and pay are like, but make sure you check that too. If you're getting 34cents/mile and 3,000 miles every week, but dry van pays you 36cents/mile but only 2,000 miles a week...just saying you need to consider it.

Good luck.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Are you currently driving for Swift? If not and you're going to be switching companies, check out as many as possible.

I am dry van , since December, 2014, and I think I've only done a middle of the night pick up once. I usually like to start early like 4-6am. But I'm usually either hooked to the load from the day before or on my way for a drop/hook.

I don't know what your miles and pay are like, but make sure you check that too. If you're getting 34cents/mile and 3,000 miles every week, but dry van pays you 36cents/mile but only 2,000 miles a week...just saying you need to consider it.

Good luck.

Yes, currently at Swift. Not sure I really understand what you mean. The pay per mile is the same for reefer and dry van and my miles would likely stay about the same--miles might possibly and hopefully increase actually as I would potentially have more flexibility in appointments with more drop and hook , and less fatigue leading to fewer un-planned breaks.

Worst case scenario my miles and pay remain about the same but I just don't like it--I can always switch back to reefer if I want. Swift would love that.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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