Trucking And Making Time To Study For Entrance Exam

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Adam A.'s Comment
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I recent got CDL. I will be starting with a company orientation in about a month for regional/otr. I just have question regarding making time for other stuff mainly studying. Is it feasible and easily managable to make up about 2hours a day to study for something. I would be taking lsat/gre (entrance exam for grad school) sometime. I will need to study 1.5-2hrs daily for about 4 months. If i do trucking, would it be easy to make time for study without affectiong my perfomance as a driver.

Thank you.

Adam

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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That's quite a bit of time to have to dedicate to it on the side. I'd say it's doable if you're highly motivated but it's going to be a heck of a struggle at times. Most drivers, especially early in their career, spend most of their time working or sleeping. You're utterly exhausted by the end of most days. When you do get a couple of hours to take a break during the day, like if you're waiting to be loaded or unloaded, you normally spend that time catching a nap so you're ready to roll when they're finished with the load.

So yeah, I'd say it's probably doable but you'd have to be highly motivated.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Adam, you have to be really dedicated to make that time for study. You have 10 hours break every day, minimum. So take whatever your natural sleep needs are and subtract from 10.

Then you have "living" activities like meals, shower, laundry, etc. It if that remainder. The test could be your study time.

There's another thread talking about whether you should stop when you're tired of when you're done, (when you're tired), so keep that in mind, too.

I assume you're thinking law school (LSAT). Studying and driving will get you prepared for that paper chase for sure.

Adam A.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes. Thank you both.

Adam, you have to be really dedicated to make that time for study. You have 10 hours break every day, minimum. So take whatever your natural sleep needs are and subtract from 10.

Then you have "living" activities like meals, shower, laundry, etc. It if that remainder. The test could be your study time.

There's another thread talking about whether you should stop when you're tired of when you're done, (when you're tired), so keep that in mind, too.

I assume you're thinking law school (LSAT). Studying and driving will get you prepared for that paper chase for sure.

Steve C.'s Comment
member avatar

Does it have to be 1.5 - 2 hours each day, or can you average that amount (i.e. 4 hours one day and 0 hours the next to average two)? Some starter companies (it seems mostly flatbed) will get you home for a 34 hour reset each weekend. You might not have much time during the week to study, but you could absolutely make up the time on weekends. Just a thought.

Adam A.'s Comment
member avatar

Average. But About 10-15 hrs a week. Reset my be good time.

Thanks

Does it have to be 1.5 - 2 hours each day, or can you average that amount (i.e. 4 hours one day and 0 hours the next to average two)? Some starter companies (it seems mostly flatbed) will get you home for a 34 hour reset each weekend. You might not have much time during the week to study, but you could absolutely make up the time on weekends. Just a thought.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to be really honest here.... I doubt u d have the time to do a good job.. and keep your sanity. When I started I had already published five full novels.of about 300 pages each. The week I tested (october) I had a hotel room and wrote 30,000 words of a new book. I haven't picked it up since.

I am exhausted as Brett mentioned. I want to watch a movie and sleep. When I write or study I need to get in a zone and once there I don't like interruption. Trucking is a lot of interruption.

Much of my sleep is interrupted, let alone my concentrating on something of importance.

I'm not saying you can't do it. But it will be a struggle.... especially in training. I had to team... it was hard enough trying to sleep with someone else driving... blasting the horns and radio... the on guard braking the truck. And the constant bouncing. Also with teaming I drove 550 miles per day. Solo I might do 250 one day and 620 the next. It depends on the load. So I have more time solo than in training... but my desire to write is gone due to mental fatigue.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

It can be done, but I would not expect to do it until you have been driving solo for at least a month or so. When team training, your ability to study will be limited or allowed by the attitude of your trainer. When you are driving solo, your options will be limited by your loads.

I write serial fiction for a hobby. This generally takes 12-20 hours of writing time per chapter, and I tend to write best when I have a large, single block of time to write in. So I beat my 70 to death, then take a 34 and write. It's taken me four months on the road, and I still can't manage a full chapter every 34.

If you want a little study time every day, you might chase your 70, drive 8-9 hours every single day, and have a little more time at the end of your day to study. Some loads will be too tight for this option though.

It can be done, but don't expect to be able to consistently manage regular study time, and you are certainly not going to be doing much, other than drive, eat, sleep, study.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Why are you going to truck if you are going on to become a lawyer? Not discouraging you but it sounds wierd to me haha.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Why are you going to truck if you are going on to become a lawyer? Not discouraging you but it sounds wierd to me haha.

So when Adam puts up his "Big Truck Crash" billboard, he knows what he's talking about. Or maybe he can put up a "4-wheeler get in the way?" billboard near truck stops.

rofl-2.gif

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