Christian Truck Drivers

Topic 1563 | Page 1

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Danny S.'s Comment
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Just wondering if there are any Christian drivers on this forum. Would like to hear from you and your experience in truck driving. Thanks and God bless.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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I'm Christian and I'm a driver. Love the job and the challenges. It's definitely more like a lifestyle.

Danny S.'s Comment
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Thanks Daniel B. good to hear from a fellow believer, I will look at some of your past post to find about your journey into trucking. By the way who do you drive for?

Old School's Comment
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Danny, you should check out Daniel's training diary in the CDL training section of the forum. Just click on the Truckers Forum Homepage and then click on the CDL training section. You'll find it a fascinating and informative read.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Daniel B.'s Comment
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Thanks Daniel B. good to hear from a fellow believer, I will look at some of your past post to find about your journey into trucking. By the way who do you drive for?

I drive for Central Refrigerated. But, make sure you explore all the companies and find the right one for you.

I started training in November of 2012 and you can find my journey through trucking here.

If you have any questions feel free to ask.

Danny S.'s Comment
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Thanks to both of you, great dairy Daniel very informative. I start CDL School this Saturday October 12, I have been researching for about 6 weeks and last week I finally made the decision to go for it. It has been hard because I am 57 years old and making this kind of lifestyle change is been a difficult one. I am presently driving a school bus and have been doing so for seven years but it doesn't provide enough income so I decided to go into trucking. I am anxious to get started and see what lies ahead. Been doing the cdl training here on TT and has been a great help. Even though I won't have to take the general knowledge and air brake test in order to get my class A permit it has really been good to restudy all this. (I have a class B now) About 30 years back I drove a dump truck and a tractor with a low-boy just a little, so with all this I believe I have a basic understanding, but I also know I am not too old to learn something new I am going to just build on what I have and reading your post helps me to see what is ahead. I will try to post as I proceed forward. God bless!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Starcar's Comment
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Danny S,,,welcome to the forum...and yes, theres quite a few Christian truckers here, both retired drivers (myself included) drivers, rookies, and those still looking into trucking. Being a driver isn't that hard for a Christian, but its sometimes hard to find a worship service. Alot of the truckstops have truckers chapels that I've been to, and they are fine. But if you are like me, just bring "the Book" and do your own thing with God. While your in school, you are so very welcome to come here with any questions. I'd have yougo thru as much of the High Road Training Program as you can get thru. I'm sure you know alot of it,but it will really make your classroom time fly...AND alot of times, when the instructors see you sitting there, done with your work, they will grab you up and take you out to practice in a truck on the range !!! So get the head start you can...And let us know how you are doing !! Blessings

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Danny S.'s Comment
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Thanks Starcar, it is a encouraging to know that there are folks like all of you out there that have been where I am. You know sometimes you need someone to just tell you you are on the right track. The one thing I like about Trucking truth is that it is not overly negative, here it doesn't paint trucking as a profession where nothing is negative but it gives you a balanced view of it. At first in my research I was reading so much negative that I was debating whether or not I wanted to get in it but then I found TT website and it has really been a blessing. I do have a question, I read that when you are given a load the company gives you directions to that customer, now are you expected to go exactly by that route or do you have flexibility to go another way because many say that directions given to you through the company are wrong. Also when given a load are you usually given more than enough time to get to the destination or are you given just enough time to get there? I am a kind of person who hates being late on my bus I know exactly what time to leave so that I am at my first stop the same time everyday. When I do field trips I know exactly where I am going before I leave I usually look at a satellite view of the place so I know if there are going to be any issues before I get there. I hope being this way will be helpful to me as a truck driver Thanks for advice. God Bless

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Being that way will definitely help you as a trucker! Companies need drivers, but it's very difficult to find reliable and professional drivers.

The routes given to you by the company usually are correct in terms of Interstates and highways. You could take your own road but the directions given to you are usually the fastest from point A to B. There will be times that you will have to it get creative and do your own routing. For example, I got a preloaded trailer dropped for me in IL that delivered in MI. However, the kingpin setting wasn't legal and I couldn't make it legal. So I developed my own route to the shipper to bypass the weigh stations. But usually you follow the company directions.

For local directions you want to combine the companies local directions, to your gps, and have a vision on it using Google Earth. Everyone has their own way but I am not a risk taker and I make sure I know every turn before going to a destination.

Some loads have time on it and some don't. There's really no answer to that question because every load is different. But before you accept a load you need to review it and make sure you have the hours to deliver the load on time. They don't want you doing loads that you cannot complete on time.

I hope I helped!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Danny S.'s Comment
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Thanks Daniel it was helpful. You brought up something about the king pin setting, I take it that in some states there is a maximum distance from the king pin to the rear of the trailer?? Or something like that. However couldn't that be adjusted by sliding the trailer wheels? I am sorry I keep asking questions but if you learn something beforehand then you are ahead of the game. Things like this do they go over this during your orientation and training or does your trainer or I guess the question is, is your trainer suppose to tell you these things? I guess one of things that I am concerned about is whether I will get a trainer like one you had that basically sounded like he was just in it for the money or will I be fortunate to get one who really wants to teach you as much as possible to help you become a good driver and asset to the company.

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