Christian Truck Drivers

Topic 1563 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
You brought up something about the king pin setting, I take it that in some states there is a maximum distance from the king pin to the rear of the trailer?? Or something like that. However couldn't that be adjusted by sliding the trailer wheels?

The answers are yes and yes! smile.gif

do they go over this during your orientation and training or does your trainer or I guess the question is, is your trainer suppose to tell you these things?

There are actually a lot of things that should be covered but often times are not. That's why we built two sections ourselves into our High Road Training Program - Logbook Rules and Weight & Balance. Neither are covered nearly as well as they should be in school or in training most of the time. The Weight & Balance section will teach you about maximum kingpin length, the Bridge Law, how to shift weight around to balance out the axles, how to calculate fuel burnoff, and all kinds of stuff like that. So make sure you go through those two sections. They'll be a tremendous help.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Steven B.'s Comment
member avatar

Just wondering if there are any Christian drivers on this forum. Would like to hear from you and your experience in truck driving. Thanks and God bless.

Not me, though I can appreciate this, and relate that it's now against my religion to be a trucker (but then, I just became religious, so it will have to augment my profession, probably for the long haul, so to speak). The good part is, following its principles will make me a safer driver (ironically, as it rhymes with pain)...

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
member avatar

Well it sure is nice to hear that there are Christian truck drivers. When I was growing up, the usual reputation was more toward the negative than the positive. And when I became a Christian, I too, wondered if a Christian could be a truck driver. Right now, I am thinking 'YES'. I think this goes right along with the thread "What kind of truck driver are you?" You can be a good example as well as a good witness to others; whether truck driver or not. This is really welcome to know.thank-you.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Danny S.'s Comment
member avatar

Steven I feel the same way I just want my life to be a blessing to others. I have always strove to be a great employee, a great friend and just make a difference in the world we live in. It is the little things we do that make a difference like picking trash in a parking lot or just taking care of your truck. I drive a school bus right now and the other day I was getting fuel and I always check my oil when I fuel up, one of the other drivers commented about it and said that they had never seen anyone check their oil, that was the shop's job. I said I was told that I was suppose to do it so I do. Whether I am a Christian or not I want to do the right thing, but especially because I am a Christian. God Bless hope to hear more from you in the future as you journey into truck driving.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Danny, in some states its called the "bridge' law. California is famous for it. I'll let one of the guys here explain it, since I've pulled a spread axle flatbed for to many years, and with its solid set axles, I only worried about how they loaded it, not how to slide it, so its legal.

Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Danny,

I love Canton, Ga. It is beautiful up there. It has grown a great deal over the years. I haven't been up there in a while.

You have asked a wonderful question. And before I continue let me say something quickly. Daniel B. you just put a smile on my heart.smile.gif To see you as the first post to that question is a testament to the love God has graced us with.

But, Danny...yes their many believers who are trucker. I won't go into the human ideology of it, but will say that I know He has many of His children serving here on this website. I would venture to say that some don't even know that is why they are here. He's good about that.

Many of the stories that you will read and post are filled with the spirit. They may not be scriptural in nature but they are of the spirit none the less. God uses trucker drivers in a very important way. In several ways! He lead me to this website and I am so very humbled by my experience to date.

And yes. sometimes we do just need a place or someone to talk to. Vent our frustrations or share our blessings. This is a great place in which to do it. I know too that He is working in the industry itself too. Many things are happening. You just have to ask Him what they are and where they are at. If you listen closely while driving down His roads, you will hear Him. He speaks with a very loving, merciful and graceful voice.

Welcome to the forum. I looked forward to being blessed by your posts and stories of your travels.

My prayers are for traveling mercies for you this evening and for all the drivers around this great world we have been blessed to travel.

Hands Palm To Palm.

Danny S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello to you Tracey, Good to hear from a Georgia boy. I have seen a few of your post as I have read thru the forum. I was reading your profile and you remind me of my self. I remember as a kid I would sit in a chair and pretend I was driving a truck, would sit hours and do it. It was a dream to do it. When I was in my 30's I with a friend of mine bought a old international dump truck it was five speed with a three speed auxiliary transmission. Some great days driving that truck. Don't know why I never got into trucking before now except God had other plans for me up until now. But through a series of Life events I am here and ready to go. I am currently driving a school bus and I start CDL School this next Saturday. Hoping by Christmas to be with a company starting my driving career. Do you drive for a company or are you an O/O? If you have any advice for me sure would appreciate it. I agree this is a great website before I found TT I was almost ready to give up the idea of going into trucking because all I was finding on the internet was so negative with just whinners and complainers, but Brett and others have done a fantastic job of presenting truck driving in a balanced view. The High Road CDL training is the greatest, I have thoroughly enjoyed going through it. I have studied it along with the georgia manual and I know I can do very well on the exams. I know that in today's world when you say you are a Christian it can mean alot of different things to people and regretfully many people have a bad impression of Christians. But as I told Steven I just want to make a difference in the world that I live in and I pray that I will make a difference as a truck driver. Again thanks for the post and encouragement thank-you.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Danny, I truly believe that you will be a credit to the truck driving community, and a huge credit to all Christian drivers out there.... Now get started on your adventure in trucking and the path that God has chosen for you !!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tracy W.'s Comment
member avatar

Add me to the list of Christian Truck Drivers. I know I wouldn't have made it this far if God didn't have a firm hand on my truck. You will encounter Trucker Churches ... usually a converted Dry Van trailer...at some truck stops. If you're lucky enough to be at a truck stop with one on Sunday at the right time, you can partake.

The bridge law must be on your mind ever time you get a new trailer. We deliver to a lot of places that require you to slide your tandems all the way to the rear before you can even come on to their property to unload. When you leave, or drop your trailer and get a new one, you must make sure your tandems meet the standard of the states you will be in. I generally slide them to the California rule of 40' between Kingpin and rear Tandem axle because that is the most stringent standard and will pass every other state. Of course, if weight and balance requires you change it, be aware of what the requirements are in each state you will pass through. I recommend setting the 'Bridge' to whatever the most stringent state is before you roll anywhere so you don't forget.

My company created and gives the drivers 'The Red Book' which has lots of info, including information on each state requirements what our trailers are like. Many companies' trailers are marked with the California requirements on the side of the trailer.

The tandem pin position and brakes are probably the two most likely items to get hit on during a DoT Level One inspection.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Conservative's Comment
member avatar

I would be interested in knowing how you all handle Sundays? Does your company allow you to have your home time then or do you get to shut down for the day? Or do you just give the profit from Sundays to charity or church. I am asking because this is the only drawback I have on trucking. I have grown up not working at all on Sundays and have been very firm on not working on Sunday with my past employers. Interested to hear how you Christian Truckers handle this.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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