Hourly Pay

Topic 15630 | Page 1

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Big Ben's Comment
member avatar

Hey all, long time lurker first time poster. I have been with my company for 11 months already, I did 3 months otr then got lucky with a semi-local gig that pays hourly. Let me tell you a bit about it, I usually am gone for about 5 to 6 days starting Sunday driving back Friday, Saturday if I run out of drive time. Some days I don't drive at all because there are no loads, my pay checks have been anywhere from lowest $200-$800 a week. I already talked to my dm and she seems like she is trying to get me more loads. I do love driving there's no complaint there and I do love my job, it's easy dedicated. I guess my question is, for being gone from my family so long (4 year old daughter and wife) should I be making more per week that is steady and not up and down? I not to sure of I'm making any sense here but yeah there it is. Any questions feel free to ask or any inpu, thanks!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

I prefer cpm pay. It rewards the drivers that really bust their a$$ to turn miles. If you are gone from home for 5-6 days per week, you must be getting paid hourly for the time you actually drive? Figure out your mileage and break it down to cpm, and see where you stand.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, the ups and downs aren't as important as the overall pay rate per month or per year. But if you've been with the company for nearly a year and you're staying out 5 days at a time you should certainly be making $45,000 per year or more at this point. So your gross paychecks, before any taxes or anything are taken out, should be at least $800 per week on average.

We have some drivers here that are on dedicated accounts with Swift that are home either every weekend or every few days and they're making $50,000+ on what they consider fairly easy gigs. Those jobs are out there, especially once you've gotten a little experience, which you have.

What does your dm say about the prospects for more freight?

Are your paychecks in the same range as other drivers on your account?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

You're with the same company that you drove OTR for? What you described sounds more like a road driver, and usually road drivers are cpm , not hourly. Who do you work for? Hourly gigs typically have a set work week, where you're usually getting 40 some hours if not more, depending on freight. Most hourly drivers think in terms of work week hours, instead of loads. Hourly makes me think of food service, fuel delivery, LTL pickup and delivery jobs, not being a road driver as you're describing. It's hard to comment on what you should expect out of your job, because frankly based on your description I'm confused about your job. Can you clarify a bit?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

So let me start by saying that I make about the same amount as you that you have on a good week. That said im only gone one or two nights a week and my hours are always consistent. Your type of gig sounds more like it should be cpm. There will be better paying hourly jobs that you'll be home everyday. Like 6string said, food and beverage delivery, fuel delivery, etc. Of course all of this depends on where you live. That can seriously effect the jobs and pay available.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Big Ben's Comment
member avatar

Ok I'm going to try to answer all the questions in the response so if I miss you let me know. I work for swift since I got my cdl back in September 2015 did otr until November 2015 then got on the Michael's dedicated account for swift in December 2015. I get paid hourly wether I'm on duty driver or on duty not driving. My work week is suppose to be Sunday through Thursday with Friday and Saturday off but that changes constantly depending on the customers need. If I don't have a load my dm will try to have me run empties back to the customer but not too often because empties are scarce. The numbers I put up are after taxes and so far I have yet to take home $1000 after taxes even with 4 hours left on my 70 hour. I hope I answered all questions. I hope I'm not coming of as complaining because I'm not and I do love the account I'm on, I just feel for being gone so long I should be making more especial if my days off are really 34 hour resets.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Fire Marshal Bill's Comment
member avatar

How much are you being paid per hour?

I work a hourly in running ports and I'm home every night.

Check with your DM and ask questions because this doesn't sound like hourly to me.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Ben's Comment
member avatar

How much are you being paid per hour?

I work a hourly in running ports and I'm home every night.

Check with your DM and ask questions because this doesn't sound like hourly to me.

I'm getting $20 an hour

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Fire Marshal Bill's Comment
member avatar

I make the same. Just flat hourly. 8-12 hrs per day Mon -Fri.

Is it for time driving/on duty?

Big Ben's Comment
member avatar

I make the same. Just flat hourly. 8-12 hrs per day Mon -Fri.

Is it for time driving/on duty?

It's both driving and on duty not driving

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