Do You Have The Right Temperament For This Job?

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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You hate him? I'm shocked... u are such a nice person; )

But morons are indeed hard to deal with.

Susan D. 's Comment
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All the rest are awesome. I bring cases of Cheerwine to my first DM from when i was solo. Shes fantastic and i tell her often how much i miss her. We also tell Michaels old solo DM wemiss her too. Thanks to her excellent management i drove more miles during training than any other student lol. We often bring gifts of soft drinks and snacks to our favorite dispatchers .. Things that arent sold in Iowa lol. Bribery pays off.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
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Paul wrote:

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I think there's also something to be said for just sticking it out and learning, even if you don't necessarily have the "right" temperament for the job.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're saying. There are people, like my parents for example, who don't have the temperament for the job. They could learn, but I think they would need to learn to control their tempers before they got into this career rather than once they're already in it. It's one thing to get ****ed off at another driver and cuss them out in the solitude of your own truck; it's a completely different story to "lose it" and physically react/retaliate in some way. This job does have a huge emphasis on safety.

But there are other people who might not really have what it takes initially, but they learn to fake it til they make it, so to speak. Try as I might, right now I just don't have the discipline and physical stamina to drive 500-600 miles a day for six days straight. The constant sitting (ya know, being literally strapped to a chair for 10+ hours a day) and really long days are really starting to drive me nuts, but I'm making do for the moment until I can figure out how to manage things better. Truth is, otr isn't the only gig out there. I don't think I really have the right temperament for otr, at least not at this point in my life, but I love driving trucks and it's not crazy to think that a different setup might be much more suitable for me--maybe one that gets me out of the truck more often.

I think there's definitely a right temperament for enjoying the heck out of the job while being very productive in it, but I think anyone that is willing to learn and work hard can make it work (unless for some reason they literally can't do it physically/mentally). Either way, it really seems like you're talking more about otr trucking than other types of trucking jobs.

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Paul I appreciate your response. All I am really saying here is know your temperament, that way you are able to adjust and maximize your potential.

In many regards you have accomplished that. Look how you handled your initial DM before Miller/Coors.

I think you have most of it figured out.

Sorry, guess I misunderstood you. And actually, come to think of it, you're right I have handled otr better than I realized. I'm just frustrated right now cause I can't seem to run as many miles as they're giving me.

I think I tend to forget sometimes what the wrong temperament really looks like because I spend so much time on this forum where most everyone really "gets" it. And I talk to people like Devan and my other other friend at Swift, both of whom have great can-do attitudes.

I really appreciate that this forum is full of drivers who do have the right temperament and encourage each other to keep it up.

Anyways thanks for the post. Sorry for my misunderstanding.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

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Paul wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I think there's also something to be said for just sticking it out and learning, even if you don't necessarily have the "right" temperament for the job.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're saying. There are people, like my parents for example, who don't have the temperament for the job. They could learn, but I think they would need to learn to control their tempers before they got into this career rather than once they're already in it. It's one thing to get ****ed off at another driver and cuss them out in the solitude of your own truck; it's a completely different story to "lose it" and physically react/retaliate in some way. This job does have a huge emphasis on safety.

But there are other people who might not really have what it takes initially, but they learn to fake it til they make it, so to speak. Try as I might, right now I just don't have the discipline and physical stamina to drive 500-600 miles a day for six days straight. The constant sitting (ya know, being literally strapped to a chair for 10+ hours a day) and really long days are really starting to drive me nuts, but I'm making do for the moment until I can figure out how to manage things better. Truth is, otr isn't the only gig out there. I don't think I really have the right temperament for otr, at least not at this point in my life, but I love driving trucks and it's not crazy to think that a different setup might be much more suitable for me--maybe one that gets me out of the truck more often.

I think there's definitely a right temperament for enjoying the heck out of the job while being very productive in it, but I think anyone that is willing to learn and work hard can make it work (unless for some reason they literally can't do it physically/mentally). Either way, it really seems like you're talking more about otr trucking than other types of trucking jobs.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Paul I appreciate your response. All I am really saying here is know your temperament, that way you are able to adjust and maximize your potential.

In many regards you have accomplished that. Look how you handled your initial DM before Miller/Coors.

I think you have most of it figured out.

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry, guess I misunderstood you. And actually, come to think of it, you're right I have handled otr better than I realized. I'm just frustrated right now cause I can't seem to run as many miles as they're giving me.

I think I tend to forget sometimes what the wrong temperament really looks like because I spend so much time on this forum where most everyone really "gets" it. And I talk to people like Devan and my other other friend at Swift, both of whom have great can-do attitudes.

I really appreciate that this forum is full of drivers who do have the right temperament and encourage each other to keep it up.

Anyways thanks for the post. Sorry for my misunderstanding.

Is your frustration a time management issue we can help with? Most of us might get it but sometimes we all have loads we can't make. Crap happens everyday.. and people have pointed out they like my posts where I make a fool out of myself if it is going to help others not make that mistake.

I had a load the other day j couldn't make... not enough time on my 70 and they knew that when I got it. So not every driver completes every load

So give us an example then I can humiliate myself to make you laugh and release some of that frustration lol

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Rainy you don't need my help to make a fool out of yourself. Just kidding hahaha.

No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

That is one of those things that gets easier the longer you do it. Your stamina will increase as time goes by. I can do two or three weeks like that now chasing the clock with only 10s in between before I'm wiped out and wanting a reset. I get antsy if I have to sit more than 12 or 14 hours.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

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No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

double-quotes-end.png

That is one of those things that gets easier the longer you do it. Your stamina will increase as time goes by. I can do two or three weeks like that now chasing the clock with only 10s in between before I'm wiped out and wanting a reset. I get antsy if I have to sit more than 12 or 14 hours.

Huh. I hope it works that way for me too. Right now I have good days and bad days. Yesterday was a bad day, when I couldn't sit still all day and I was falling asleep after 400 miles. Today was a good day--drove 400 miles, dropped off and picked up loads, and felt good at the end of the day even though I didn't take a break all day.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

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double-quotes-start.png

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No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

That is one of those things that gets easier the longer you do it. Your stamina will increase as time goes by. I can do two or three weeks like that now chasing the clock with only 10s in between before I'm wiped out and wanting a reset. I get antsy if I have to sit more than 12 or 14 hours.

double-quotes-end.png

Huh. I hope it works that way for me too. Right now I have good days and bad days. Yesterday was a bad day, when I couldn't sit still all day and I was falling asleep after 400 miles. Today was a good day--drove 400 miles, dropped off and picked up loads, and felt good at the end of the day even though I didn't take a break all day.

Are your appts so tight u can't stop for a 30 min or 60 min nap? An hour or even 2 usually recharges me

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Rainy you don't need my help to make a fool out of yourself. Just kidding hahaha.

No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

So expand your horizons. Look at LTL :)

If you already like to back, then the excuses for staying OTR for a year are moot.

I drove 275 miles today, worked 10 hours of which 2 were overtime at time and a half (any over 8 in a day are overtime) and I'm home snug in my bed for a 3-day weekend.

Never did OTR and have no desire to ever do OTR. Especially after reading the trials and tribulations here. :)

The big argument against against local is the variety. True. I worry about that every day. But I've reached my one year mark and so far the worst I've had is driving down into DC one day.

I understand sticking out OTR for one year to fulfill a contract. But if it's not for you then look elsewhere.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar
Are your appts so tight u can't stop for a 30 min or 60 min nap? An hour or even 2 usually recharges me

I usually have enough time to go 600 miles in about 12 hours. I often have a little more time than that, but it all depends on what time I get to the shipper. So...if I can go 600 miles in about 10.5 hours of driving, that leaves 1.5 hours extra per day. Figure 15 minute pretrip, 5 min post trip, mandatory 30 min break, that leaves 30-40 minutes extra. Well if I stop for 5 minutes twice in the morning and stop once for 10 minutes in the afternoon, I have like 10 minutes left (enough time to fuel). This is also assuming that I didn't take more than 10 hrs off, either. It's those little breaks that get me.

I'm hoping my body starts adjusting better soon. One day last week, I was making good time before I stopped for my 30 minute break. I was gonna take a shower but was wiped out so I went in the sleeper for 20 minutes. I woke up 2 hours later and my alarm had been going off for an hour and a half straight. It was gonna make me late but I sent a running late macro and csr changed the appt time.

Then a couple days ago I was making really good time, drove all morning with just one break, took my 30 and ate lunch. I started getting tired in the afternoon so I stopped to grab something to munch on. I'd driven 400 miles so far. When I got back to the truck I still felt so sleepy I just shut down--didn't need to be driving like that.

Then there are days like yesterday. Drove 300 miles straight when I got up. Live unloaded at receiver--took a little over an hour. Stopped for fuel and drove 60 miles to next shipper. Took me a while to pick up the load but got it done. Then drove another hour or so to a Love's and shut down. 13 hour day, 420 miles, never took a break (didn't even eat lunch lol), never got tired. WEIRD.

They're really good about changing the appt times on this account, but I feel like I'm letting my dm down every time I start running late.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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