Do You Have The Right Temperament For This Job?

Topic 16092 | Page 4

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Pianoman's Comment
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Rainy you don't need my help to make a fool out of yourself. Just kidding hahaha.

No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

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So expand your horizons. Look at LTL :)

If you already like to back, then the excuses for staying OTR for a year are moot.

I drove 275 miles today, worked 10 hours of which 2 were overtime at time and a half (any over 8 in a day are overtime) and I'm home snug in my bed for a 3-day weekend.

Never did OTR and have no desire to ever do OTR. Especially after reading the trials and tribulations here. :)

The big argument against against local is the variety. True. I worry about that every day. But I've reached my one year mark and so far the worst I've had is driving down into DC one day.

I understand sticking out OTR for one year to fulfill a contract. But if it's not for you then look elsewhere.

Are you a linehaul or P&D driver?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Phoenix's Comment
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Paul, I'm beginning to wonder if the fatigue might be caused by diet. Are you eating healthy? For example, is your sugar and/or carb intake high? Sugar makes a body crash after the initial short burst of energy. There are so many things in a diet that can cause fatigue.

Pianoman's Comment
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Paul, I'm beginning to wonder if the fatigue might be caused by diet. Are you eating healthy? For example, is your sugar and/or carb intake high? Sugar makes a body crash after the initial short burst of energy. There are so many things in a diet that can cause fatigue.

Not...really....

Confession time. I never got a 12 volt cooker and my fridge leaks. I haven't had time to clean it out since the last time it got all moldy so I've been living off the best food ever--truck stop food!!!

I go for Subway alot but that doesnt always happen. I've been trying to avoid the soda, somewhat successfully. I just get so frickin hungry and I don't have really healthy food so I eat everything in sight...and somehow never gain a pound.

Old School's Comment
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I am sure that your diabetes has some effect on this whole scenario too. Of all of us, you are the one who really needs to be careful about his diet.

Sorry Paul, I just realized that I sound like your mother giving you a lecture. But dang it boy, you better take care of yourself!

Phoenix's Comment
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Paul, I need to drive for a couple hours, but many don't realize just how important diet is. feelyne@hotmail.com is muy email, if you'd like to continue this conversation. Sheila

Phoenix's Comment
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I second OS's advice.

Pianoman's Comment
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I am sure that your diabetes has some effect on this whole scenario too. Of all of us, you are the one who really needs to be careful about his diet.

Sorry Paul, I just realized that I sound like your mother giving you a lecture. But dang it boy, you better take care of yourself!

Haha thanks Old School. I appreciate the advice. The diabetes plays a huge role. Not trying to throw a pity party here--more of a word of advice for other Type I diabetics looking to get into trucking. There are alot of type I (type 2 is what most people have, and it's a lot different) diabetics that can't hold down even a normal job with 40 hours a week, living at home. Now try giving up your routine, living on the road, being subject to strict hours of service regulations, and working 80 hours of week. And if you don't maintain good control, you'll lose your job. Otr or dedicated trucking is already hard without diabetes, but it's crazy crazy hard with it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Paul, I need to drive for a couple hours, but many don't realize just how important diet is. feelyne@hotmail.com is muy email, if you'd like to continue this conversation. Sheila

Thanks Phoenix I'll shoot you an email! I don't mind having a conversation on TT though if it helps other people.

Pianoman's Comment
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Sorry G Town for hijacking your thread. I suck!

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Bud A.'s Comment
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Paul, I didn't realize you are Type I. My dad lived with that for almost 40 years. It will take extra effort, but please take that effort to monitor your body. It will help a lot.

The other thing I was going to say is that as you gain experience, you will spend less energy doing things like navigating and shifting and so on. Some things will almost become automatic, so it will take less energy and you will have more to run longer days. But that comes with time and repetition so it can't be rushed along.

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