Do You Have The Right Temperament For This Job?

Topic 16092 | Page 5

Page 5 of 6 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Rainy you don't need my help to make a fool out of yourself. Just kidding hahaha.

No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

So expand your horizons. Look at LTL :)

If you already like to back, then the excuses for staying OTR for a year are moot.

I drove 275 miles today, worked 10 hours of which 2 were overtime at time and a half (any over 8 in a day are overtime) and I'm home snug in my bed for a 3-day weekend.

Never did OTR and have no desire to ever do OTR. Especially after reading the trials and tribulations here. :)

The big argument against against local is the variety. True. I worry about that every day. But I've reached my one year mark and so far the worst I've had is driving down into DC one day.

I understand sticking out OTR for one year to fulfill a contract. But if it's not for you then look elsewhere.

double-quotes-end.png

Are you a linehaul or P&D driver?

I do P&D. Started out working the dock and getting kicked-out doing linehaul but now just doing local. I'm nudging up against $50K for my first year plus paid vacation and sick time. You get that regardless if you're P&D or linehaul. For employee only my healthcare cost runs me about $21a week. That includes medical, dental, vision and life insurance.

Being so new if I were straight linehaul I'd get paid $.50 mile plus .5hr for drop and hook , .25hr for refuel. In my area, FedEx starts at $20hr, rising a dollar a year to $25 for the first five years. In CA there is no mileage pay. All hourly.

For me, being home everyday is worth thousands of dollars. If I wanted to save mucho dinero then I'd probably screw the rent and do OTR for a few years.

But linehaul is the easiest job in FedEx and gets paid more. You're home everyday regardless if you're P&D or linehaul

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Rainy you don't need my help to make a fool out of yourself. Just kidding hahaha.

No I wish it were something like that, but it's just that I get super tired and worn out after 3 or 4 days of driving 500-600 miles each day with only 10 hours off in between. They run me really really well on this account without me ever having to say a word to dispatch or the planners. So well, in fact, that I have to ask for a day off sometimes just to catch up on sleep. I feel like my job has changed from lobbying for miles to lobbying for sleep haha

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

So expand your horizons. Look at LTL :)

If you already like to back, then the excuses for staying OTR for a year are moot.

I drove 275 miles today, worked 10 hours of which 2 were overtime at time and a half (any over 8 in a day are overtime) and I'm home snug in my bed for a 3-day weekend.

Never did OTR and have no desire to ever do OTR. Especially after reading the trials and tribulations here. :)

The big argument against against local is the variety. True. I worry about that every day. But I've reached my one year mark and so far the worst I've had is driving down into DC one day.

I understand sticking out OTR for one year to fulfill a contract. But if it's not for you then look elsewhere.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Are you a linehaul or P&D driver?

double-quotes-end.png

I do P&D. Started out working the dock and getting kicked-out doing linehaul but now just doing local. I'm nudging up against $50K for my first year plus paid vacation and sick time. You get that regardless if you're P&D or linehaul. For employee only my healthcare cost runs me about $21a week. That includes medical, dental, vision and life insurance.

Being so new if I were straight linehaul I'd get paid $.50 mile plus .5hr for drop and hook , .25hr for refuel. In my area, FedEx starts at $20hr, rising a dollar a year to $25 for the first five years. In CA there is no mileage pay. All hourly.

For me, being home everyday is worth thousands of dollars. If I wanted to save mucho dinero then I'd probably screw the rent and do OTR for a few years.

But linehaul is the easiest job in FedEx and gets paid more. You're home everyday regardless if you're P&D or linehaul

Oh, and let me not forget the most important part; you get weekends off plus paid holidays off. If you care to work a little more you can volunteer for Saturday loads.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Sorry G Town for hijacking your thread. I suck!

shocked.pngembarrassed.gif

We're good. No worries.

Nighthawk's Comment
member avatar

When you're a top tier driver in this industry you know what it takes to operate at the highest levels so you can tell what's going to happen within two minutes of meeting another driver, whether they have experience or not. You can tell whether they get it or not. You can tell if they have the right approach, the right attitude, and the right level of ambition almost immediately.

Only in person? Or can you tell by the vigor (or lack thereof) on this forum?

What I'm getting at is... what about me, yo?? Do I "get it", from what you all have seen?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Misty asks:

Only in person? Or can you tell by the vigor (or lack thereof) on this forum?

What I'm getting at is... what about me, yo?? Do I "get it", from what you all have seen?

I have read all your posts Misty. Although you have a ways to go, so far it seems like you are headed in the right direction and seem serious about learning.

You read the thread and lots of other stuff on here, what do you think?

Nighthawk's Comment
member avatar

You read the thread and lots of other stuff on here, what do you think?

It's mine for the taking. And I'm ready to take...

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, the test is the road. Training can be grueling. Life on the road is not what people expect. Lack of sleep, scheduling showers, restrooms and food, meeting what seems like impossible deadlines can be aggravating. Add lack of skills for the truck handling, lack of knowledge for roads and parking areas, and the stress of never getting it right...boy it can drive a perfectionist insane.

You wont be perfect, ever. You will over years become more confident and knowlegable.

Some peope think having a CDL makes you special and in demand. NOPE. Having a CDL with an awesome safety and on time delivery record makes yoi special Not for just 2 or 4 months, but years. Fleet Managers watch you closely. Mine even knows i'm going to park 30 mins after I slow to 45 mph due to high winds. I didn't even know that.

Once you get to the point where you ask your FM "What bad habits do I have that you don't want me teaching a student" and his response is "Nothing. You are great!" Then you know you have arrived.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rainy wrote:

Honestly, the test is the road. Training can be grueling. Life on the road is not what people expect. Lack of sleep, scheduling showers, restrooms and food, meeting what seems like impossible deadlines can be aggravating. Add lack of skills for the truck handling, lack of knowledge for roads and parking areas, and the stress of never getting it right...boy it can drive a perfectionist insane

Misty,... Rainy paints a complete picture in her reply. I must however emphasize that each step of the way; permit, school, CDL and road training each come with their unique and at times daunting challenges. Each new step serially builds upon the foundation from previous achievements, successes and often mistakes.

The correct attitude, focus and commitment is required from beginning to first seat status. One step at a time...don't look too far past the immediate challenge, otherwise it's easy to become overwhelmed.

I do think you have the initial commitment, motivation and positive attitude to progress. However like Rainy said, and I do agree the final test, when you are on your own is the one that counts the most and is lasting.

One step at a time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Nighthawk's Comment
member avatar

Thanks, you guys. I know I'll make it. I'm way too into this not to. I am nearly obsessed. I'm constantly reading the High Road CDL Training Program and the forum. I'm taking practice tests from multiple sources. I'm going to make it work, dang it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Misty, in the last two posts (Rainy and G-Town) you have received probably the best "new-trucker" advice in a few paragraphs I have seen in the 4 1/2 years I have been active on this forum. Bookmark this page so you can come back to it.

You have just had a traumatic experience in your start for truck driving, and I believe you can get through the whole thing (the experience and your training). I'll add my catch phrase:

Don't let life happen to you.
Page 5 of 6 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More