A Day In The Life Of A Walmart Dedicated Driver

Topic 16176 | Page 4

Page 4 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Rock's Comment
member avatar

Appreciate the awesome write up! I stopped driving several months ago but just got an offer to drive on a local Walmart dedicated account. I am seriously considering it. I have delivered to Walmart Dcs before in the SE but that was OTR. The local gig sounds like more of a grind but coming home daily sounds like it could make it worth it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town, that is a pretty good read. I run out of DC 6019 in Loveland, CO on and off through a contract Knight has with Wal-Mart.

All they do out of the DC is the GM side, I've only done one two-store load and everything other than that has been to a single store and back, sometimes with a vendor or pallets thrown in as a detour.

I can usually make about three stores a day, takes about 12 hours a day because of how they dispatch from this DC. It's fun stuff though, I actually like every occasion I get to visit a new store.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Keith and Rock.

Walmart Dedicated is a great gig. It’s not for everyone; and usually the “love it” or “hate it” occurs rather quickly.

So yes Keith, I happened to see a newer Wally reefer at the DC yesterday marked in red for “6019”. Let me know if you ever see one in your neck of the woods marked for 7030...worlds apart.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town-that was an awesome read. You broke it down perfectly. Its nice to see that even a dedicated can be fun. Your input has greatly given a new perspective of Refer/Dry Van loads. I know I will have to get used to them after driving fuel tankers before. But it what challenges us to do this. I hope you have many more good days like this!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

Never saw this post. I'm glad people commented on it and brought it back. Great imagery in your words. G-TOWN. I grew up in that area. Lived in Sunbury, Milton, and Watsontown. Someone told me that Walmart company drivers make a ton of money, ever think about working directly for them?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Rob. I appreciate that.

Sure I’ve thought of driving for WMPF , but not lately. I have it really good with Swift. For example I was asked this past Friday afternoon; “where do you want to run tomorrow?” So basically, the planner and I reviewed all of the 375-400 mile 3 stop dry runs with a backhaul. I selected Hamilton NJ, Toms River NJ and of course Nestle’ Water. You can’t put a price on that...it’s something I earned and I won’t willingly give it up.

I have built great relationships with the Swift terminal management team; especially the planners and driver leaders. I have incredible flexibility, tremendous support and the ability to choose and be dispatched on the best available runs.

Yes, but what about the money? I’ll answer that with a question...

“How much do you think the top performing Swift drivers make running Dedicated Walmart at the DC I am assigned to?”

I think the actual answer will surprise you.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

LOL, not sure if that is a rhetorical question, but I will guess, 95K

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

LOL, not sure if that is a rhetorical question, but I will guess, 95K

No, not a rhetorical question. 95k is high though.

Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you GTown, this was a great read. I have a friend that I went to the Academy with who trained for Walmart Dedicated. I was curious about the life of dedicated, as opposed to otr. I think they both have their advantages and disadvantages. I don't believe that I am built for dedicated myself. It's just, hard work, to me. Buttttt, on the other hand, otr is hard work as well. ☺️ My clock is ticking tick ticking away as I type this. It seems like I've been cutting it really close on my clock here lately. So, ha ha.... another day in the life of otr, and dedicated.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Greg wrote:

I was curious about the life of dedicated, as opposed to otr. I think they both have their advantages and disadvantages. I don't believe that I am built for dedicated myself. It's just, hard work, to me. Buttttt, on the other hand, otr is hard work as well.

It all depends on the type of Dedicated Account a driver is assigned to. Many are OTR but only handle freight for a single customer. Old School is a Knight Dedicated driver to SAPA. He is effectively OTR. Me on the other hand, draw a 250 mile radius circle around the DC and that’s the extent of our territory. On occasion we’ll venture into an adjacent territory like Johnstown NY or in a blue moon Bedford PA.

80% of the drivers assigned to the DC I drive from sleep in their trucks, usually at the DC or at a nearby Walmart that at times serves as an overflow lot for drivers (5 miles from the DC) The other 20% live nearby and slip-seat in daycabs or 42” LW sleepers. The sleepers allow the option to take the 10 hour break if a longer run requires it. Overall the goal for all of us is to make it back to the DC before the 14 expires for the 10 hour break so we begin the next shift with a fresh clock.

With Walmart Dedicated. I think the major difference is length of run. Most of our dispatched runs are between 300-400 miles with multiple store stops (up to 5) and frequently a backhaul along the way. It requires a lot of hustle, minimizing wasted time, constantly managing the 14 hour block, as opposed to most OTR gigs focus on the drive clock. Backing up to 7 times per shift, close quarter maneuvering is the norm for the Walmart gig.

The other difference is consistent pay, not much variance when driving 5.5-6 days in a 7 day week, week to week. It’s rare to wait for an outbound store load or to get unloaded at a store or Sam’s. Occasionally a vendor backhaul will hold us up, but usually the exception. Always moving...

It’s love - hate. For those on the forum who know me, they’ll confirm that I love running Walmart Dedicated.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 4 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More