Intermodal

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Renegade's Comment
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Now that I've got a better understanding of dry van and tanker divisions can someone elaborate on the intermodal opportunities? Do trucking companies reserve these positions for experienced drivers only or is it something a new driver can jump in to right out of school?

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I ran intermodal reefer for two weeks with prime during training. I was told that division at prime is lease op/owner op only, no company drivers.

It was quite an experience though. You basically shuttle trailers back and forth from rail yards to customers. I ran the Chicago area and it involved a ton of inner city driving as this is where the rail yards are. What I did like is that i got to know where the customers were so I didn't feel nervous about missing turns or looking for signs., while teaming though we had not time for anything. They kept us running.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Renegade's Comment
member avatar

That's what I was wondering Rainy D. I haven't really read anything that stated it was reserved for experienced drivers only but I'm sure every company has different policies about who they assign Intermodal freight to. I was just wondering if there were companies that let rookies jump in head first to the intermodal division.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I think jb hunt and Schneider both have intermodel divisions that rookies can get into. The biggest issue I see with it is It seems like you would have the same problems as being a p&d driver for an ltl carrier. Lots of city driving increased risk with the 4 wheelers.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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That's what I was wondering Rainy D. I haven't really read anything that stated it was reserved for experienced drivers only but I'm sure every company has different policies about who they assign Intermodal freight to. I was just wondering if there were companies that let rookies jump in head first to the intermodal division.

Keep in mind you would be in one area... So that means you might want to look at companies close to home. My trainer lived in Chicago but we ran so.much he never went home. Not even to do laundry...imagine the smell hahahhaj jk

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Now that I've got a better understanding of dry van and tanker divisions can someone elaborate on the intermodal opportunities? Do trucking companies reserve these positions for experienced drivers only or is it something a new driver can jump in to right out of school?

Intermodal is where the $$ is at! I was running Otr with Henderson trucking and my miles started to dip, I got tired of doing a 34 reset over the weekend away from home, so I started applying to regional jobs JB Hunt being 1 of them. I applied for intermodal regional with JB. after 6 weeks my fleet manager called me. Local intermodal had a position open and they wanted to know if I was interested the rest is history. Doing regional intermodal for 6 weeks gave me the training for the rail yards, so when I went local my trainer just had to show me how to make the $$. I liked regional intermodal, but I love local intermodal with JB. Most $$ I have ever made and I am home every day and off 2 days a week.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

P.S. You only need 3 months experience to get a regional intermodal job with JB Hunt

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

That's cool to know. Prime foes a flat rate of $1.08 per mile to lease/owner ops. The guy in Chicago complained constantly of no money but hated his friend in Harrisburg who was "making a killing".

Each company is different. How close are u to a city with rails though?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

One additional point to understand and consider, intermodal equipment; trailers, containers and chassis are subjected to a far greater degree of damage and hard use.

Take extra care when inspecting your equipment before moving it. One of DOT's favorite "campsites" are near intermodal yards. It provides them lots of revenue, lik fishing in a barrel.

Good luck!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

One additional point to understand and consider, intermodal equipment; trailers, containers and chassis are subjected to a far greater degree of damage and hard use.

Take extra care when inspecting your equipment before moving it. One of DOT's favorite "campsites" are near intermodal yards. It provides them lots of revenue, lik fishing in a barrel.

Good luck!

Good points. One of the biggest problems I saw was the upper sides where the cranes grab them to lift them.

It could cause damage the trailer which could affect the reefer temps. So make notes of all damage on pick up reports.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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