Would Like Some Trucker Opinions About A Non-trucking Related Question (military)

Topic 16341 | Page 1

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Craig T.'s Comment
member avatar

I've thought about why I should and should not join the military ever since high school. I've been gaining more insights, more wisdom, and more reasons not to join every single year of my life. There's a bunch of personal reasons not related to any kind of righteousness, spite, or patriotism for why I would want to put myself through it. These reasons simply won't go away no matter what bit of new information comes my way.

I'm asking this here because I know there's a lot of veterans in this industry. The vast majority of the people I meet nowadays are progressive, incredibly sweet, and somewhat of a incognito hippy/educated/professional mix who has never done a real day of work throughout their entire lives.

I've essentially come to the point where I've got to make a final decision. I turned 27 while thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail this year which I think means I'm coming awfully close to the cut-off age to the things I would like to get involved in. The main reason I haven't joined the military at this point is because I've discovered several life passions of mine that I can't maintain while in the military. If I don't join, then there's one sure thing in my life that I wouldn't be able to cross off my "been there, done that" list. Which is pretty damn important to me. If I do join and something happens to me, there goes the possibility of pursuing the things I've fallen in love with. At the same time, I'm trying not to live forever and I'm committed to not having my own children.

For those who need to know what I have in mind so they can figure out how crazy/stupid I am; I'm looking at Marines, Rangers, maybe SF, maybe Recon, or maybe go for PJ. The cherry on top is that I would enlist instead of going straight to OCS.

In the meantime, I'm pretending to readjust back to civilization after loosing 34lbs on the PCT this year. I'm not someone that can easily loose a few pounds to begin with... so I'm going back to work (not OTR trucking, it's amazing what kind of opportunities are available with a class A and a bit of experience if you're free to go anywhere) and getting my general fitness/health back up to my kind of normal. If I don't go military next year, I'll be completing my triple crown on the CDT and continuing my other life passions until I die.

Cheers if you like to read a lot.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Craig, I read your PCT blog as far as Tehachapi, and enjoyed your trip. I got to Forester pass on a John Muir Trail trip, and it truly was a high point for me, in more than one way. Congratulations on completing such a grueling project.

I also read your post here. Twice. I have a feeling that trucking won't make you happy. The military options you list will also take a big chunk out of your lifetime, and, frankly, you'll be better for it. In driving a truck around the country, you will have a limited set of goals, like always being on time, keeping safe, and such. Should you go the military route, regardless of the unit you get into, you will have very high standards you must meet every single day, and often each hour of every day.

To me, (4 years USAF in the Vietnam era) you will be a better man after you put on military boots for four years.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I am for military service. I spent 17 1/2 years in. If you want to start at the bottom go enlisted. A recruiter won't say no. You can always go to OCS later. It will make you a better leader in the end to start at the bottom. I have my fair share of injuries, but being in the military will make you more disciplined and have more intestinal fortitude. You will learn to toughen up and work thru things that would leave some squealing like a child. You are already used to separation from home so that will be no biggie for you.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

At 27 years old, you probably know yourself well enough to answer these questions relatively decently. Considering that, from my very brief exposure to you, (in this thread) you seem to like solo activities, I have two big questions.

How well do you take direction? If you have a hard time following directions because you want to do it your way, that's going to be a problem.

Do you work well with others? If you're a solo type and don't interface with others well to get things done, that'll also be a problem.

The more advanced ground combat teams have to learn to follow orders almost without thinking about it, and work together instinctively. If one of the above two questions is a problem, you might be able to make it work if you can force yourself to change/adapt. If both of the above questions lead to a problem, you will probably be miserable in the sorts of military jobs you expressed interest in.

That said, almost anyone can do military service, if you choose a job that suits your personality, and don't let the recruiter throw you into some random MOS.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kanelin's Comment
member avatar

I have always said that joining the military was the best thing I ever did and I highly recommend it. I have more patience and self-reliance. Long hours and poor situations don't bother me too much. And, more than anything I learned discipline. I think that no matter how much discipline you.already have, you will acquire more, and that's a good thing. And I would def go enlisted, starting at the bottom and working my way up did so much to rid me of any sense of entitlement. I now have so much more gratitude for everything on my life.

So I vote military. Truck driving will still be here when you're done.

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

I joined the army at age 27. There are benefits and challenges to going in at that age. Unless they've changed things since I got out or I'm not remembering correctly, either one is possible lol, the cutoff age is 31. Though it is possible to get a waiver to join at an older age.

I wouldn't give up my experience in the military for anything. So of it's something you feel you want to do, I'd say it's worth it

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I spent 12 years in the military and I'm certainly better for having completed both Army and Navy Bootcamps. The military allowed me to overcome some obstacles and satisfy a yearning to serve my country.

The military occupations you are considering are not easy to achieve and I applaud your desire and passion. In the Navy, I knew SEALs and some guys who didn't make it through the program. The ones who didn't make it were devastated and still were men I'd want next to me in any situation.

Of all the reasons people join the military, I still believe Patriotism and a desire to SERVE the country must be at the top of the list. That's just this man's opinion.

Good luck! Thank YOU for allowing us to give input and whatever you decide, GODSPEED!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

I've thought about why I should and should not join the military ever since high school. I've been gaining more insights, more wisdom, and more reasons not to join every single year of my life. There's a bunch of personal reasons not related to any kind of righteousness, spite, or patriotism for why I would want to put myself through it. These reasons simply won't go away no matter what bit of new information comes my way.

I'm asking this here because I know there's a lot of veterans in this industry. The vast majority of the people I meet nowadays are progressive, incredibly sweet, and somewhat of a incognito hippy/educated/professional mix who has never done a real day of work throughout their entire lives.

I've essentially come to the point where I've got to make a final decision. I turned 27 while thru-hiking the Pacific Crest Trail this year which I think means I'm coming awfully close to the cut-off age to the things I would like to get involved in. The main reason I haven't joined the military at this point is because I've discovered several life passions of mine that I can't maintain while in the military. If I don't join, then there's one sure thing in my life that I wouldn't be able to cross off my "been there, done that" list. Which is pretty damn important to me. If I do join and something happens to me, there goes the possibility of pursuing the things I've fallen in love with. At the same time, I'm trying not to live forever and I'm committed to not having my own children.

For those who need to know what I have in mind so they can figure out how crazy/stupid I am; I'm looking at Marines, Rangers, maybe SF, maybe Recon, or maybe go for PJ. The cherry on top is that I would enlist instead of going straight to OCS.

In the meantime, I'm pretending to readjust back to civilization after loosing 34lbs on the PCT this year. I'm not someone that can easily loose a few pounds to begin with... so I'm going back to work (not OTR trucking, it's amazing what kind of opportunities are available with a class A and a bit of experience if you're free to go anywhere) and getting my general fitness/health back up to my kind of normal. If I don't go military next year, I'll be completing my triple crown on the CDT and continuing my other life passions until I die.

Cheers if you like to read a lot.

You can't just join and become a Ranger. You used to not be able to become a Green Beret right out of Basic but it seems they've lowered the standards on that too.

http://www.military.com/military-fitness/army-special-operations/army-green-beret-training

If you want a challenge and just something to cross off your bucket list, go for it. The worst that can happen is after you qualify for one of your elite schools, if you fail, you'll become a regular grunt to finish off your tour. So be prepared to kill people and break things as a backup plan.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

's Comment
member avatar

I've barely started in the trucking industry. But I joined the Marines a long time ago, after 30 minutes in front of a recruiter where I didn't listen to a word he said except "Well, what do you think?" I said, "I'll sign." Two weeks later I was standing on yellow foot prints in San Diego. And to borrow a quote from a fellow Marine who explained why he joined the Corps: "If the French Foreign Legion had been in the phone book, I would have joined them." So...

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