Help A Rookie Do And Donts

Topic 16415 | Page 1

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Adam W.'s Comment
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What would you say are do and don't of trucking help us rookies it can be for anything trucking related

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Here's some threads we have on this including time management and other useful tips. ;)

Rob S.'s Comment
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Search for truck stop etiquette. I'm not savvy enough to do links with my phone.

G-Town's Comment
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What would you say are do and don't of trucking help us rookies it can be for anything trucking related

I think this is one of the links that Rainy was trying to send you. Rookie Advice

Adam W.'s Comment
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Thank you those all help me

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Michael C.'s Comment
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In my short length of experience that I've been driving, Here's the biggest DO and DON"T I can give.

DO- GOAL, without a doubt if you're not sure, get out and look. Don't leave it to "I think I got it".

DON'T- The biggest mistake I've seen other people make, that I'm guilty of as well is, being in a hurry. If you do a quick youtube search of trucking accidents, especially those at yards and truck stops, majority are caused by the driver being in a hurry. "Ahh, there is a spot, I got this, swing around at 15mph not looking in your mirrors and then boom, you tear off the front end of the neighboring truck or trailer". As much as you need to get to your destination, take your time, especially in heavy traffic, people WILL cut you off. If you leave room, 4-wheelers will take the spot. If you leave no room, they'll still take it. Biggest difference is that you have more time to react and adjust accordingly.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
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I always think that consciously being vigilant to keep a safe following distance at all times is one of the most important factors in keeping you safe, not only for your self, but fellow motorists also.

This applies to both rookies and veterans, as veteran drivers are probably the worst offenders in this critical safety habit.

It's very easy to let yourself get in too big a hurry, or just distracted with something, and start cruising to closely to other vehicles, or riding in a group. You have to be in control of all the spaces around your truck - all six of them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Adam W.'s Comment
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Is driving in the right lane on interstate for safety, rule or law

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Old School's Comment
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Well, in most states it is law that the slower vehicles are to keep to the right. Trucks, most of which are governed at 62 mph, certainly fall in this category. In some states trucks are not even allowed over in the hammer lane. I-95 throughout most of Connecticut is an example of this.

The reality of why most trucks are traveling in that right lane is that it gives you a little less to worry about with one side of your vehicle not having traffic flowing around it, but you will have to be keenly aware of those 4-wheelers who don't understand the concept of merging into traffic, and there's a lot of them. Occasionally I've also had nuts pass me on the right, using the shoulder! So never quit paying attention to what's happening over there on that right side, even when you are in that right lane.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Farmerbob1's Comment
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What would you say are do and don't of trucking help us rookies it can be for anything trucking related

Always assume that everyone in any vehicle near you is a complete idiot. Then you will rarely be surprised. I drove 285 around Atlanta last night during rush hour to get to a shipper , then back on 285 again through Atlanta this afternoon on my way to destination.

Sooo much road fail and driver fail in Atlanta.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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