CRST Granted Exemption To Allow Non-CDL Holders To Drive By Themselves

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Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

CRST Granted Exemption To Allow Non-CDL Holders To Drive By Themselves

“FMCSA announces its decision to grant CRST Expedited (CRST) an exemption from the regulation that requires a commercial learner’s permit (CLP) holder to be accompanied by a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder with the proper CDL class and endorsements, seated in the front seat of the vehicle while the CLP holder performs behind-the- wheel training on public roads or highways.”

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

"Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration".

How does this decision administer to the safe operation of a motor carrier?

At best conflicted...

I know CRE was granted a similar exemption but I do not see how this is consistent with other things they are doing and have done that are restrictive and contradict a decision like this.

confused.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

"Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration".

How does this decision administer to the safe operation of a motor carrier?

At best conflicted...

I know CRE was granted a similar exemption but I do not see how this is consistent with other things they are doing and have done that are restrictive and contradict a decision like this.

confused.gif

Follow the MONEY!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

"Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration".

How does this decision administer to the safe operation of a motor carrier?

At best conflicted...

I know CRE was granted a similar exemption but I do not see how this is consistent with other things they are doing and have done that are restrictive and contradict a decision like this.

confused.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Follow the MONEY!

No kidding,...next.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

WOW!

Quality of training goes DOWN - # of accidents GOES UP.

Considering CRST is 100% teams - I can see how they wouldn't want to go to the trouble of ACTUALLY TRAINING AND SUPERVISING A PERMIT HOLDER - versus running the miles.

Do they chain them to the drivers seat too?

This is insane, and there's a reason WHY this has been a rule since time immemorial.

Rick

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Thats just plain scary!

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

I'm gonna admit something here... I drove three weeks with my permit and the instructor from time to time would nap. My first toll booth and through 300 miles between Ohio and PA he was asleep, and I could concentrate on what I was doing rather than what he was saying. I was actually more comfortable and less anxious without him watching me. However I was always a night person so in the beginning he let me drive nights (which apparently wasn't allowed either I found out later). Without the traffic and stress I was able to learn to handle the equipment. I really think it relaxed me.

He jumped in the back to make breakfast once and said "wow...you drive a whole lot better with me back here". And the way the rules are now, you only need have your permit for two weeks before you test. Even if you don't drive. Go figure. I already had my permit a week by the time I got my trainer and they told me I could test in a week if I wanted.

With the SIMS and these accelerated courses some students don't even get into a truck until the day before they test out. There were others in my class whose instructors kept them out five and six weeks. That has to put them in a different class than permitted drivers on their first week. Or those who only drove SIMS.

Honestly I'm not so sure the test actually proves anything. Am I less likely to have an accident? The test allows you like 31 points to fail. I think that is kinda high cause I've seen some who have scored close to that and they scare me lol.

On the other hand it probably depends on the person. I was a good driver before... Very defensive...even the examiner threw his clipboard on the dash and said " this is gonna be easy". My second trainer watched me for a few hours and said "cool, he taught you to drive well and read signs. I can sleep now." Was there really that much of a difference in my driving the day before my license and the day after? Does someone who fails the exam twice and gets the license automatically become better than the permitted driver who drives well.

Is a trainer going to go to sleep and trust a driver who knows nothing? I understand the safety concerns but there are dangerous drivers out here WITH experience. I think is a relative issue. Some people will drive better than others even from the beginning. But I'm not saying everyone is like that or evey trainer should be forced to trust someone without experience.

I've actually been hearing complaints from prime trainers who normally do the teaming phase saying they don't think some trainees were prepared enough even though they are licensed. So now the trainers feel like they are also instructors while trying to team.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Also keep in mind I had been driving a car for 25/years in the congestion of Philly/NJ/NY area and was used to crazy drivers heavy traffic snow and ice. That is a lot different from a 22 year old with one year of car driving from the rural south who never even seen snow let alone drove in it. I would imagine it would be much harder for that person to relax.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rainy wrote:

Also keep in mind I had been driving a car for 25/years in the congestion of Philly/NJ/NY area and was used to crazy drivers heavy traffic snow and ice. That is a lot different from a 22 year old with one year of car driving from the rural south who never even seen snow let alone drove in it. I would imagine it would be much harder for that person to relax.

I get what you're saying Rainy. So you are possibly in the minority, lots of driving experience, safe, etc, before you got into trucking. Many of us on the forum likely had a similar record. Given that, Prime would not have had a clear idea of your skills if your trainer wasn't observing you.

I believe Prime and many other companies have process and intent to train their new drivers. I invite any experienced CRST driver to offer some (hopeful) clarity on their training process and how public safety isn't compromised by this direction.

IMO this decision by the FMCSA doesn't embrace the importance of training and opens the door for future decisions that bring profitability ahead of safety.

I guess this shows just how much closer to "driverless" trucks we actually are. My thinking on this closely aligns with Rick and Sue. I think it's a very bad precedent.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
The Breeze's Comment
member avatar

Also keep in mind I had been driving a car for 25/years in the congestion of Philly/NJ/NY area and was used to crazy drivers heavy traffic snow and ice. That is a lot different from a 22 year old with one year of car driving from the rural south who never even seen snow let alone drove in it. I would imagine it would be much harder for that person to relax.

I agree with you Rainy, and I happen to be a 23 year old from the south. I struggled when I got into real traffic and was very tense, but managed to push through it. Driving a truck on the highway is primarily about judgement and not necessarily about skill, I do believe that drivers who start in their 30's or 40's fair better in the judgment department.

That being said, I think what we have here with CRST is an argument based on principal. The company is essentially exploiting the student for profit. Yes you will learn the most about truck driving on your own without instruction, but while you're a student you need the guidance of someone who's experienced. I recieved my training from Swift and got my license from a third party school, so I never received company training with my learners permit.

In Swift training, they required the trainer to be on duty for your first 50 hours behind the wheel. I think that should be the bare minimum. Yes my trainer was sometimes more distracting than helpful but there were plenty of times where his input was valuable. I think that if a company expects one to carry all the responsibility and liability of operating a commercial vehicle independently (trainer off duty in sleeper birth), then that person should be fully licensed.

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